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How Catastrophic Floods May Have Carved Greenland’s ‘Grand Canyon’

In a new study, researchers propose a mechanism for how mega-canyons under northern Greenland’s ice sheet formed: from a series of catastrophic outburst floods that suddenly and repeatedly drained lakes of meltwater.

by |April 30, 2020

Global COVID-19 Map Viewer Shows Case Data, Age/Sex Features of At-Risk Populations

A new tool provides data that can help identify populations most at risk from coronavirus, around the world and down to the U.S. county level.

dome and city skyline at sunset

Project Takes A New Approach to Gauging New York City’s Emissions

Estimates say the city releases about 50 million tons of carbon a year, but no one has actually measured it. A new project is trying to change that.

by Elise Gout |April 28, 2020
Buildings surrounded by water flowing out of North Carolina's Cape Fear River in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Mary Junell/U.S. Army)

Waterfront Development Added Billions to Property Values Exposed to Hurricane Florence

Rapid development in flood-prone zones during recent decades helped boost the amount of property exposed to the 2018 hurricane substantially, a new study says.

by |April 21, 2020

New Data Suggest COVID-19 Is Shifting the Burden of Energy Costs to Households

Apartment-level electricity use has increased under New York’s stay-at-home order. It could make matters worse for households already struggling economically.

by Christoph J. Meinrenken, Vijay Modi, Kathleen R. McKeown and Patricia J. Culligan |April 21, 2020

Kevin Uno: Examining How Early Humans Responded to Climate Change

Kevin Uno, a Center for Climate and Life Fellow, studies how abrupt changes in climate affected Neolithic human settlement, diet, and abandonment in northwest Africa.

by |April 9, 2020

American Robins Now Migrate 12 Days Earlier Than in 1994

New GPS data show birds adjust to shifting snow conditions as climate warms

by |April 1, 2020

Ozone Treaty Stopped Jet-Stream Drift in Southern Hemisphere

Researchers long ago predicted that the 1987 Montreal Protocol, banning ozone-depleting gases, would reverse a worrisome trend in Southern Hemisphere winds. A new study shows they were right.

by |March 27, 2020

The Shutdown Is Clearing New York’s Air. Don’t Cheer Too Hard.

Researchers are measuring severe drops in pollutants at the ground level, but warn that the benefits will be short-lived unless we take away some longer-term lessons.

by |March 25, 2020

Increasingly Mobile Sea Ice Means Arctic Neighbors May Pollute Each Others’ Waters

The movement of sea ice between Arctic countries is expected to significantly increase this century, raising the risk of more widely transporting pollutants like microplastics and oil, according to new research.

by |March 18, 2020