dendrochronology Archives - State of the Planet

Within Sight of New York City, an Old-Growth Forest Faces Storms and Sea Level Rise

On a peninsula within sight of New York City, researchers are studying trees dating as far back as the early 1800s. Rising seas and more powerful storms, both fueled by climate change, could eventually spell their end.

by |December 3, 2019

Photo Essay: An Old-Growth Forest Near New York City Faces Storms and Sea-Level Rise

Centuries-old trees on a peninsula near New York City could provide an important record of past storms. Researchers recently traveled there to sample the trees before they are wiped out by rising seas and powerful storms.

by |December 3, 2019

New Tree Ring Analysis Method May Open Insights to Past Climate

Measurements of stable isotopes in tree rings may expand the climate information that scientists can get from old trees.

by |February 28, 2019

New Class on Predicting the Effects of Climate Change on Global Forests

Brendan Buckley discusses his course, Predicting the Effects of Climate Change on Global Forests, which is offered this spring.

by |February 4, 2019

Photo Essay: High in the Hills, Climate May Challenge Forests

Forests in the south-central United States are some of the country’s most productive and diverse. They also sit in a warming “hole”—an area where the progressive rise in temperature affecting most of the continent hasn’t yet taken hold. A team from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is studying how these forests might shift—or even disappear—when climate change does catch up with them, as expected.

by |March 15, 2016

How Will Shifting Climate Change U.S. Forests?

One foggy spring morning just after a hard rain, Park Williams was tromping through the woods deep in Arkansas’ Ozark Mountains. Toiling down a steep slope, he supposedly was keeping a simultaneous eye out for rattlesnakes, copperheads, poison ivy and big old trees. Williams seemed mostly focused on the trees, though; attention to the other stuff was just slowing him down. Williams studies how forests react to changes in climate, and the Ozarks’ deeply dissected hills and hollers—what some might refer to as typical hillbilly country—are a kind of ground zero for this.

by |March 15, 2016

A New Global Team Tracks Temperature Change Through Time

A new international consortium of scientists is bringing the history of temperature fluctuations across the entire Northern Hemisphere to life.

by |January 28, 2016
Tree ring research was a young field in 1975 when Ed Cook (above, in Nepal) and Gordon Jacoby founded the Tree Ring Lab at Lamont. The Lab would become a world leader in tree ring sampling and analysis and a source of technology and training for dendrochronologists around the world. Photo by Paul Krusic

Translating Nature’s Historians: The Tree Ring Lab Turns 40

In its first 40 years, the Lamont Tree Ring Lab tracked changing climates around the world, building an international reputation as a global leader in research, training and technology.

by |September 16, 2015
Scientists documented the first annual tree rings in a native species on Hawai'i in māmane found on the slopes of Mauna Kea. Photo: Scot Nelson/CC-BY-SA-2.0

Tree Rings on Hawai’i Could Hold New Knowledge About El Niño

Annual tree rings are a rare find in the tropical islands of the eastern Pacific. The new discovery of trees with annual rings on a Hawaiian volcano could provide new climate data from a part of the world where much of the variability of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation originates.

by |August 21, 2015