State of the Planet - Page 2 of 470 - News from the Earth Institute

Pioneer in Charting Modern Sea Level Rise to Receive 2020 Vetlesen Prize

A scientist who has played a key role in documenting modern sea level rise and its causes is to receive the 2020 Vetlesen Prize for achievement in the earth sciences.

by |January 21, 2020

Ozone-Depleting Substances Caused Half of Late 20th-Century Arctic Warming, Says Study

A study finds that ozone-depleting substances caused about a third of all global warming from 1955 to 2005, and half of Arctic warming and sea ice loss during that period.

by |January 20, 2020

It’s Not Just About Climate Change, It’s About Our Health – and the Energy Sector Is Key

Quickly transitioning our energy supplies to clean, low-carbon energy sources is a tremendous opportunity to improve our health.

by Melissa C. Lott |January 16, 2020

A Guide to the Good, Low-Carbon Life

For about 10 years, environmental law professor Karl Coplan has been trying to winnow down his direct footprint of CO2 emissions. He has been successful, and has just published a book chronicling his efforts.

by |January 13, 2020

Rising Temperatures Will Mean More Fatal Injuries in the U.S., Says Study

Thousands more people could die from injuries each year as rising temperatures in the United States affect people’s behavior, says a new study.

by |January 13, 2020

Bringing Consensus Politics Back to Environmental Issues

In the blue-red political world we’ve created we need to remember the values we share and our interdependency.

by |January 13, 2020

Completing My Fieldwork and Returning to Dhaka

My last days in the field brought us to monuments in a makeshift home near the ocean, a flooded field next to a school, and adjacent to a jute mill. Most of us now head back to Dhaka, the capital. Céline will stay on a few more days, then Hasnat with Saif and Nahin will continue until all the monuments are resurveyed.

by |January 13, 2020

Long Days in the Field in Southern Bangladesh

We continued our GPS surveys of monuments to measure land subsidence. While the work general went very well, we faced challenges from obscured or tilted monuments. We also struggled with large traffic delays, particularly at unpredictable ferry crossings.

by |January 10, 2020
ants on a plant

The Next Climate Tech Breakthrough May Have Already Happened, We Just Didn’t Notice

How biomimicry and evolution can offer sustainable solutions for adaptation and resilience.

by Isabelle Seckler |January 10, 2020
four women in evening gowns

What’s a Climate Scientist to Wear During Awards Season?

Leading researchers design formal wear with a scientific edge

by |January 10, 2020