American Geophysical Union Archives - State of the Planet

maureen raymo portrait

American Geophysical Union Honors Five Lamont Scientists

Lamont scientists representing a range of research disciplines and career stages are to receive honors from the internationally influential earth and space science organization.

by |August 22, 2019
agu panel

How Can We Use the National Climate Assessment to Prepare for Climate Change?

While the Trump administration is doing its best to ignore recent findings, an upcoming report will focus on helping cities, states, and businesses develop mitigation and adaptation strategies.

by |December 14, 2018
upmanu lall onstage at ceremony

Upmanu Lall Recognized as a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union

The director of the Columbia Water Center and 60 other honorees were commemorated in a ceremony and reception on Wednesday.

by |December 19, 2017
Agricultural fires like this one in Kenya are one source of air pollution in Africa.

Air Pollution May Kill More Africans Than HIV/AIDS

Researcher calls attention to a largely under-recognized health threat.

by |December 18, 2017
drought great famine

What Caused the Great Famine?

Scientists are unraveling the driving forces of one of the worst environmental disasters in human history, in hopes of predicting and preparing for the next global drought.

by |December 15, 2017

American Geophysical Union 2017: Key Events From the Earth Institute

A chronological guide to key talks and other events presented by Columbia University’s Earth Institute at the American Geophysical Union 2017 meeting. 

by |December 4, 2017

Creating Earthquake Heat Maps: Temperature Spikes Leave Clues in the Rock

When a fault slips, the temperature can spike by hundreds of degrees, high enough to alter organic compounds in the rocks and leave a signature. Lamont scientists have developed methods to use those organic signatures to reconstruct past earthquakes and better understand what controls them.

by |December 16, 2016

Learning from Slow-Slip Earthquakes

Off the coast of New Zealand, there is an area where earthquakes can happen in slow-motion as two tectonic plates grind past one another. These slow-slip events create an ideal lab for studying fault behavior along the shallow portion of subduction zones.

by |December 15, 2016
Greenland's ice can "darken" in ways we can see and ways we can't. Photo: Marco Tedesco

State of the Arctic: Longer Melting Seasons, Thinning Sea Ice

The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet, and scientists are seeing the effects across ice and ecosystems. Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory’s Marco Tedesco describes the changes underway.

by |December 13, 2016

IEDA: Revolutionizing Big Data

The Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance is fueling groundbreaking multi-disciplinary discoveries worldwide. “This is a new era of data mining,” says IEDA Director Kerstin Lehnert, a geochemist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

by |December 13, 2016