Earth Sciences Archives - Page 2 of 97 - State of the Planet

Scientists Track Deep History of Planets’ Motions, and Effects on Earth’s Climate

Scientists are developing a geologic record of how other planets have influenced the orbit of Earth, and thus its climate, over the last 200 million-plus years.

by |March 4, 2019

Drill Cores From Pre-Ancient Greece Open Insights to Climate

Newly analyzed drill cores taken from the bottom of Greece’s Gulf of Corinth show that sediment flow into the basin has varied dramatically over the past 500,000-plus years, as the earth passed in and out of ice ages, and humans later dominated the surrounding landscape.

by |March 1, 2019

New Tree Ring Analysis Method May Open Insights to Past Climate

Measurements of stable isotopes in tree rings may expand the climate information that scientists can get from old trees.

by |February 28, 2019

Found: The Mechanism for Arctic Cold Air Outbreaks into Eurasia

New developments in climate research led by atmospheric scientist Yutian Wu are adding to our understanding of the “polar vortex” and other extreme events.

by |February 28, 2019

Communications Workshop Helps Bridge Gap Between Scientists and Public

On February 21, scientists learned the essentials of science communication during a half-day workshop at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

by |February 22, 2019

Into Deep Field

Moving a team from a science base into a deep field camp in Antarctica comes with a mix of high energy and optimism.

by |February 20, 2019

Wallace Broecker, Prophet of Climate Change

Wallace Broecker, a geochemist who initiated key research into the history of earth’s climate and humans’ influence upon it, died Feb. 18 in New York. He was 87.

by |February 19, 2019

Photo Essay: On an Island, a Lost Part of the World Is Found

On the volcanic Indian Ocean island of Anjouan, scientists are investigating a rock that apparently formed on a far-off continent.

by |February 12, 2019

On a Remote Island, a Lost Part of the World Is Found

On a small volcanic island in the Indian Ocean lies a geologic enigma—a mass of pure white quartzite sandstone apparently formed on a faraway continent long ago. How did it get there?

by |February 12, 2019
rock with sensors attached

Dressing Boulders for Science

Attaching the sensors that will help us study erosion rates required vacuum grease, patience, and a lot of masking tape.

by |February 12, 2019