Earth Sciences Archives - Page 2 of 105 - State of the Planet

Lamont’s Marie Tharp: She Drew the Maps That Shook the World

On the 100th anniversary of her birth, her grit and brilliance are as legendary as her work.

by |July 27, 2020
Marie Tharp

Marie Tharp’s Adventures in Mapping the Seafloor, In Her Own Words

The pioneering mapmaker explains how she and colleagues discovered underwater mountain ranges 40,000 miles long, and helped to prove that the continents move.

by |July 24, 2020
Marie Tharp with one of her maps

Join Us in Celebrating #MarieTharp100

July 30 marks 100 years since the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist who created some of the first maps of the ocean floor. We’re celebrating her achievements and legacy with blog posts, giveaways, and more.

by |July 23, 2020

Lamont-Doherty Program Aims to Bring More Diversity to Earth Science

The Secondary School Field Research Program offers a diverse group of young people a unique opportunity to do field and laboratory research.

by |July 22, 2020

Groundbreaking Project Will Drill Into Bedrock Below Greenland Ice to Understand Past and Future Melting

GreenDrill promises to reveal the ice sheet’s past in unprecedented detail and enable more accurate predictions of how it may add to rising seas in the 21st century.

by |July 16, 2020

Scientists Warn of Wide Impacts on Midwaters Around Deep-Sea Mining Sites

Interest in deep-sea mining for metals has grown substantially in the last decade. A new study argues that it poses significant risks not only to the immediate surroundings, but also to the water hundreds to thousands of feet above the seafloor.

by |July 8, 2020
people on ship using long stick to pull a device out of the water

Using Sound to Study Underwater Volcanoes

To find out how volcanoes in the Pacific Ocean influence earthquakes and tsunamis, a team of scientists listens for ‘echoes’ from under the sea.

by Lindsay Key |July 7, 2020

Geologists Identify Deep-Earth Structures That May Signal Hidden Metal Lodes

Previously unrecognized structural lines deep in the earth appear to signal the locations of giant deposits of copper, lead, zinc and other vital metals near the surface.

by |June 30, 2020
Pierre Dutrieux preparing a Seaglider for deployment in front of the Dotson Ice Shelf, West Antarctica, during a summer 2018 research expedition. (Photo courtesy of Pierre Dutrieux)

Refining Projections of Antarctic Ice Loss and Global Sea Level Rise

Research by Center for Climate and Life Fellow Pierre Dutrieux will lead to greater understanding of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet’s future stability and associated sea level rise.

by |June 16, 2020
beach and ocean waves

Ocean Uptake of CO2 Could Drop as We Cut Carbon Emissions

A new study finds that ocean absorption of CO2 rises and falls along with human activity and natural phenomena. The findings are important for understanding how much the oceans will offset future climate change.

by |June 3, 2020