Marie DeNoia Aronsohn, Author at State of the Planet

janet babin in greenland

The High Stakes, High Risk Work of Covering Climate

From polar bears to budget cuts, a climate reporter’s job is never easy. But for some, it’s worth the struggle.

by |March 12, 2019
radley horton speaks at hearing

Lamont Climatologist Testifies on Capitol Hill About Sea Level Rise

In a hearing before the House Subcommittee on Environment, Radley Horton delivered sobering remarks about how climate change will impact our coastlines, economy, and society at large.

by |February 27, 2019
brown tide in florida

What’s Really Feeding Long Island’s Destructive Brown Tides?

A new study shows that phosphorus and nitrogen should be reduced to mitigate harmful algae blooms in coastal NY waters.

by |February 15, 2019
The Eiffel Tower

Lamont’s Dave Goldberg: Making Global Connections to Solve a Global Problem

David Goldberg recently returned to Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory after a visiting appointment at the University of Montpellier on a “Make Our Planet Great Again” award.

by |January 25, 2019
Cyclic variations in the energy emitted by the sun have been thought to affect weather patterns in the North Atlantic and the likelihood of storms and floods over Europe. These influences by the sun are insignificant, and could have been due to chance, suggests a new study of the instrumental record and new chemistry-climate model simulations led by Columbia/LDEO scientists. Credit: Shutterstock and NASA’s Earth Observatory.

Debunking the Solar-Cycle/North Atlantic Winter Weather Connection

The North Atlantic Oscillation is a key driver of winter weather patterns over the northern hemisphere. In recent years, research has claimed a correlation between the NAO and the 11-year solar cycle. A new paper debunks that claim.

by |January 22, 2019
airplane from the NASA Atmospheric Tomography Mission

Africa: An Air Pollution Wildcard

Atmospheric scientists discover surprising levels and unexpected types of pollution that seem to be originating in Africa.

by |December 14, 2018
Antarctic ice, from the video "What's Happening to the Ice Sheets?"

New Study Highlights Complexity of Warming and Melting in Antarctica

A concerted, multidisciplinary effort is needed to tackle this complexity, scientists argue in a paper released on Monday.

by |November 19, 2018
sean solomon accepts award

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Designated a Clean Air Campus

The award from the New York State Department of Transportation recognizes Lamont’s electric shuttle buses, bike-friendly engineering, and more.

by |October 17, 2018
water sampling device is lowered off the ship into the ocean

Every (Fifth) Breath We Take: Friends of Phytoplankton and Why They Matter

Tiny microbes called phytoplankton live beneath the ocean’s surface, producing oxygen that is essential to human survival. A new study sheds light on how these all-important diatoms survive and thrive under difficult conditions.

by |August 16, 2018
three scientists

AGU Names Three Earth Institute Scientists as 2018 Fellows

The American Geophysical Union, the world’s largest earth and space science society, made the announcement on Thursday morning.

by |August 9, 2018