Margie Turrin, Author at State of the Planet

Margie Turrin, is Education Coordinator at Columbia University’s
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory where she develops and runs science education projects for groups from informal community education, to K12 and undergraduate students. Her projects and publications range from engaging students and the public in the polar regions, understanding our Earth and environment, human interactions and impacts on their environment, Hudson River education, biodiversity, mapping and spatial skills assessments.

Recent Posts

The Story of Lake Gus

For this early part of the season the goal is to tease apart a record of historic precipitation and temperature for this region using isotopes from leaf waxes collected in the lake sediments.

by |July 25, 2018

Scientists Are Superheroes With Super Powers

Superheroes are identified by their unique powers and skills, allowing them to see and act in ways that inspire awe in the rest of us. Do scientists have superhero powers?

by |July 18, 2018

An Icy Irony in Greenland

We awoke to messages that a towering iceberg is threatening the local waterfront settlement of Innaarsuit. There is perhaps a bit of irony in the fact that a massive looming block of ice is a potential threat to the start of our field season.

by |July 13, 2018

Exploring Greenland With Wings, Boats and Drones

Snow on Ice is launching into the field with two teams of scientists this summer. The first group, an ‘advance team’ of six women, will focus on lakes where meltwater has collected on the southwestern flank of Greenland bedrock.

by |July 12, 2018

New York’s Waterways are WILD: Come Explore at the Great Fish Count!

On June 2nd, residents in and around New York City can join scientists in exploring our estuary and assessing the diversity of our local waterways.

by |May 26, 2018
taking samples of glacial erratic in greenland

Will Loss of Arctic Sea Ice Cause More ‘Snow on Ice’ in Greenland?

Scientists are collecting lake sediment, rock, water and plant samples to tease apart linkages between Arctic sea ice, atmospheric uptake, and changes in snowfall on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

by |March 28, 2018

The ‘Bird’ Has Flown!

The ‘bird’ has flown! Voices are raised in celebratory cheers from the southernmost continent to across the U.S. Our first ALAMO float is deployed! Now we can begin to answer some of the big questions on this mysterious ice/ocean interface.

by |December 2, 2016

‘Ghost Ice Shelves’ and the Third Antarctic Ice Sheet

The Antarctica Peninsula has been referred to as Antarctica’s third ice sheet. Following behind the East and West Antarctic ice sheet in size, one might be inclined to minimize its importance in the effects of melting Antarctic ice, on changes in sea level and other impacts, but that would be an imprudent mistake. The peninsula is Antarctica’s most northern spit of land; like a crooked finger it stretches out beckoning towards the southern tip of South America and her warmer climate.

by |November 24, 2016

The Domino Effect

Ice shelves can behave like dominos. When they are lined up and the first one collapses it can cause a rippling effect like dominos. We have seen this with the Larsen Ice Shelves. Named in series, the Larsen A, B and C shelves extended along the northeastern edge of the West Antarctic Peninsula, and covered a large swath of coastline as recently as twenty years ago.

by |November 14, 2016
Pine Island Ice Shelf

A First Meeting with an Old Friend

If you have studied the impacts of climate on Antarctica you have encountered Pine Island Glacier. Tucked in at an angle under the West Antarctic Peninsula handle, this seemingly innocuous glacier has been making headlines for years as one of the fastest flowing ice stream glaciers on Earth.

by |November 10, 2016