Kevin Krajick, Author at State of the Planet - Page 2 of 20

Kevin Krajick is the Earth Institute’s senior editor for science news. A native of upstate New York, he started in journalism at his high-school newspaper in the late 1960s. He has since reported from all 50 U.S. states and 30-some countries, covering science, criminal justice, immigration and other areas. His work has been featured in Newsweek, National Geographic, The New Yorker, Science, Smithsonian and many other publications. He was a 1981 finalist for the National Magazine Award for Public Service for his reporting on organized crime’s links to the toxic waste-disposal industry. He is two-time winner of the American Geophysical Union’s Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism. His 2001 book “Barren Lands” is the true account of how prospectors discovered diamond mines in Canada’s remote far north. Krajick holds degrees in comparative literature and journalism from Columbia University. He lives on the Upper West Side of Manhattan with his wife and two teen daughters.

Recent Posts

Increasing Heat Is Driving Off Clouds That Dampen California Wildfires

Sunny California may be getting too sunny. Increasing summer temperatures brought on by a combination of intensifying urbanization and warming climate are driving off once-common morning cloud cover in southern coastal areas of the state, leading to increased risk of wildfires.

by |May 30, 2018

How Australia Got Planted

A new study has uncovered when and why the native vegetation that today dominates much of Australia first expanded across the continent.

by |May 21, 2018

In India, Dirty Air Kills as Easily in the Country as in the City

A forthcoming study of northern India suggests that people living in rural areas are as likely to die prematurely from the effects of poor air quality as those living in cities.

by |May 16, 2018

Photo Essay: How High Could Seas Rise?

Columbia scientists recently visited the Caribbean island of Barbados, whose fossilized coral reefs contain an exquisite record of how the ocean has risen and fallen in the past.

by |May 14, 2018

How High Can Seas Rise? On a Tropical Isle, the Answers Are Not Always Obvious.

To help predict the future of sea level rise, scientists are studying ancient corals on the island of Barbados.

by |May 14, 2018

In Ancient Rocks, Scientists See a Climate Cycle Working Across Deep Time

A gradual shift in Earth’s orbit that repeats every 405,000 years plays a role in natural climate swings.

by |May 7, 2018
traversing the thwaites glacier

U.S., UK Scientists Join to Study Possible Collapse of Massive Antarctic Glacier

An international collaboration will study the wasting of the Thwaites glacier, which already accounts for around 4 percent of current global sea-level rise, and could collapse within decades or centuries.

by |April 30, 2018

The 100th Meridian, Where the Great Plains Begin, May Be Shifting

Two new papers find that the line that divides the moist East and arid West is edging eastward due to climate change—and the implications for farming and other pursuits could be huge.

by |April 11, 2018

Photo Essay: The Re-Greening of Puerto Rico

Researchers survey the damage to Puerto Rico’s forests in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

by |March 22, 2018

Climate Change and the Re-Greening of Puerto Rico

Ecologist Maria Uriarte investigates the effects of Hurricane Maria on the forests of Puerto Rico, and how long-term climate change may affect them.

by |March 22, 2018