Kevin Krajick, Author at State of the Planet

Kevin Krajick is the Earth Institute's senior editor for science news. He was born in a place that no longer exists, and grew up in the Catskill Mountains and Hudson Valley of upstate New York, where he started in journalism at his high-school newspaper. He has since reported from all 50 U.S. states and 30-some countries, covering science, criminal justice, immigration and other subjects. His work has been featured in National Geographic, Newsweek, The New Yorker, Science, Smithsonian and many other publications. He was a 1981 finalist for the National Magazine Award for Public Service for his reporting on organized crime's links to the toxic waste-disposal industry. Among other honors, he is two-time winner of the American Geophysical Union's Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism, and his work has been featured repeatedly in the yearly book "Best American Science and Nature Writing." His 2001 book "Barren Lands" is the true account of how prospectors discovered diamond mines in Canada's remote far north. Krajick holds degrees in comparative literature and journalism from Columbia University. He lives on the Upper West Side of Manhattan with his wife and two teen daughters.

Recent Posts

Walter Pitman: Discovered a Key to Plate Tectonics

Walter Pitman, a seagoing geophysicist who spotted a crucial piece of a huge puzzle that revolutionized the earth sciences, has died.

by |October 2, 2019

Scientists Stand With Students at Climate March

Dozens of Earth Institute staff and students took part in New York City’s Climate Strike march.

by |September 20, 2019

The Surprising Way a Volcanic Eruption Fueled a Bloom of Ocean Algae

A new study reveals a surprising way in which lava influences marine ecology.

by |September 6, 2019

The Climate Epochs That Weren’t

Climate scientists often invoke the Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age as natural worldwide climate swings predating human influences. They may not have worked the way we think.

by |July 24, 2019

How Did Africa’s Grasslands Get Started?

Millions of years ago, vegetation across much of the world underwent a transformation as grasses with a new way of doing photosynthesis displaced previously dominant plants, shrubs and trees. A new study examines what got these plants started, and why they spread so far and wide.

by |July 22, 2019

Study Bolsters Case That Climate Change Is Driving Many California Wildfires

A new study combs through the factors that can promote wildfires in California, and concludes that in many cases, warming climate is the decisive driver.

by |July 15, 2019

Part of the Pacific Ocean Is Not Warming as Expected. Why?

Climate models predict that as a result of human-induced climate change, the surface of the Pacific Ocean should be warming. But one key part is not.

by |June 24, 2019

Scientists Map Huge Undersea Fresh-Water Aquifer Off U.S. Northeast

In a new survey of the sub-seafloor off the U.S. Northeast coast, scientists have made a surprising discovery: a gigantic aquifer of relatively fresh water trapped in porous sediments lying below the salty ocean.

by |June 20, 2019

Melting of Himalayan Glaciers Has Doubled in Recent Years

A new study is the latest and perhaps most convincing indication that climate change is eating the Himalayas’ glaciers, potentially threatening water supplies for hundreds of millions of people across much of Asia.

by |June 19, 2019

Why Cry for the Cryosphere?

A new book paints a daunting and detailed picture of earth’s natural ice under threat, and explains why what happens in the Arctic doesn’t stay in the Arctic.

by |June 11, 2019