Kevin Krajick, Author at State of the Planet

Kevin Krajick is the Earth Institute's senior editor for science news. He grew up in the Catskill Mountains and Hudson Valley of upstate New York, where he started in journalism at his high-school newspaper. He has since reported from all 50 U.S. states and 30-some countries, covering science, criminal justice, immigration and other subjects. His work has been featured in National Geographic, Newsweek, The New Yorker, Science, Smithsonian and many other publications. He was a 1981 finalist for the National Magazine Award for Public Service for his reporting on organized crime's links to the toxic waste-disposal industry. Among other honors, he is two-time winner of the American Geophysical Union's Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism, and his work has been featured repeatedly in the yearly book "Best American Science and Nature Writing." His 2001 book "Barren Lands" is the true account of how prospectors discovered diamond mines in Canada's remote far north. Krajick holds degrees in comparative literature and journalism from Columbia University. He lives on the Upper West Side of Manhattan with his wife and two teen daughters.

Recent Posts

Ancient Volcanoes Once Boosted Ocean Carbon, But Humans Are Now Far Outpacing Them

A new study of the closest ancient analog to modern carbon emissions finds that massive volcanism was the main cause of high carbon at the time. But nature did not come close to matching what humans are doing today.

by |September 14, 2020

Antarctic Ice Shelves Vulnerable to Sudden Meltwater-Driven Fracturing, Says Study

A new study says that many of the ice shelves ringing Antarctica could be vulnerable to quick destruction if rising temperatures drive melt water into the numerous fractures that currently penetrate their surfaces.

by |August 26, 2020

Fossil Leaves Show High Atmospheric Carbon Spurred Ancient ‘Global Greening’

Scientists studying leaves from a forest that stood during a warm period 23 million years ago have for the first time linked high levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide with increased plant growth, as well with the high temperatures of the time.

by |August 20, 2020

Treading on Shrinking Ice

In a new book, glaciologist Marco Tedesco takes the reader on a personal journey through his sometimes dangerous work.

by |August 11, 2020

Stronger Rains in Warmer Climate Could Lessen Heat Damage to Crops, Says Study

Intensified rainstorms predicted for many areas in the United States as climate warms could more efficiently water some major crops, which would at least partially offset projected yield declines caused by rising heat itself.

by |August 10, 2020

Coming Soon? A Brief Guide to 21st-Century Megadisasters

A Q&A with Jeffrey Schlegelmilch, author of a new book on potential future calamities, and how they may play off one another.

by |July 14, 2020

Anillos de Crecimiento de los Árboles Revelan Aumento sin Precedentes en Extremos Climáticos en Sudamérica

Un nuevo Atlas Sudamericano de Sequía revela que las sequías severas expandidas y los períodos inusualmente húmedos sin precedentes han ido aumentando desde mediados del siglo XX.

by |July 7, 2020

Tree Rings Show Unprecedented Rise in Extreme Weather in South America

A new South American Drought Atlas reveals that unprecedented widespread, intense droughts and unusually wet periods have been on the rise since the mid-20th century.

by |July 7, 2020

Geologists Identify Deep-Earth Structures That May Signal Hidden Metal Lodes

Previously unrecognized structural lines deep in the earth appear to signal the locations of giant deposits of copper, lead, zinc and other vital metals near the surface.

by |June 30, 2020

A New Primer on Climate Change Science

A new primer lays out the basics of climate science in compact form.

by |May 14, 2020