Kevin Krajick, Author at State of the Planet

Kevin Krajick is the Earth Institute’s senior editor for science news. A native of upstate New York, he started in journalism at his high-school newspaper in the late 1960s. He has since reported from all 50 U.S. states and 30-some countries, covering science, criminal justice, immigration and other areas. His work has been featured in Newsweek, National Geographic, The New Yorker, Science, Smithsonian and many other publications. He was a 1981 finalist for the National Magazine Award for Public Service for his reporting on organized crime’s links to the toxic waste-disposal industry. He is two-time winner of the American Geophysical Union’s Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism. His 2001 book “Barren Lands” is the true account of how prospectors discovered diamond mines in Canada’s remote far north. Krajick holds degrees in comparative literature and journalism from Columbia University. He lives on the Upper West Side of Manhattan with his wife and two teen daughters.

Recent Posts

American Geophysical Union 2018: Key Events From the Earth Institute

The American Geophysical Union fall meeting takes place Dec. 10-14 in Washington, D.C. Here is a guide to key talks and other events from Columbia’s Earth Institute.

by |December 3, 2018

National Climate Assessment: Will U.S. Water Problems Worsen?

Upmanu Lall is director of the Columbia Water Center, and the lead author of the new U.S. National Climate Assessment’s chapter on water resources. The report paints a dire picture of the nation’s climate future. We spoke with Lall about the outlook for water supplies, quality and infrastructure.

by |November 26, 2018

A New Primer on Climate Change

A Q&A with Jason Smerdon, coauthor of the newly revised Climate Change: The Science of Global Warming and Our Energy Future.

by |November 14, 2018

Wildfire Experts: A Journalist’s Guide

A guide to wildfire experts at the Earth Institute.

by |November 14, 2018

The Melting of the Greenland Ice, Seen Up Very Close

A small team of scientists ventures out onto the Greenland ice sheet to study the forces large and small that are accelerating the melting of the world’s second-largest ice mass.

by |October 1, 2018

Photo Essay: Melting Greenland, Up Close

As climate warms, the Greenland ice sheet is melting, helping to fuel global sea-level rise. Follow a small team of scientists as they hike onto the sheet to investigate the forces large and small that are demolishing the ice.

by |October 1, 2018

North Korea’s 2017 Bomb Test Set Off Later Earthquakes, New Analysis Finds

Using newly refined analysis methods, scientists have discovered that a North Korean nuclear bomb test last fall set off aftershocks over a period of eight months on a previously unmapped earthquake fault nearby.

by |September 24, 2018

Lead Is Poisoning Children on U.S. Military Bases, Says Report

An extensive investigation by the Reuters news agency has found that many children living on U.S. military bases may be exposed to hazardous levels of lead in decaying family housing.

by |August 21, 2018
james hansen

James Hansen’s Climate Warning, 30 Years Later

Three decades after Hansen first warned Congress about global warming, the overwhelming scientific consensus is that he was right—and most would say that far too little has been done to address the threat.

by |June 26, 2018

Increasing Heat Is Driving Off Clouds That Dampen California Wildfires

Sunny California may be getting too sunny. Increasing summer temperatures brought on by a combination of intensifying urbanization and warming climate are driving off once-common morning cloud cover in southern coastal areas of the state, leading to increased risk of wildfires.

by |May 30, 2018