Kevin Krajick, Author at State of the Planet

Kevin Krajick is the Earth Institute's senior editor for science news. He was born in a place that no longer exists, and grew up in the Catskill Mountains and Hudson Valley of upstate New York, where he started in journalism at his high-school newspaper. He has since reported from all 50 U.S. states and 30-some countries, covering science, criminal justice, immigration and other subjects. His work has been featured in Newsweek, National Geographic, The New Yorker, Science, Smithsonian and many other publications. He was a 1981 finalist for the National Magazine Award for Public Service for his reporting on organized crime's links to the toxic waste-disposal industry. Among other honors, he is two-time winner of the American Geophysical Union's Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism, and his work has been featured repeatedly in the yearly book "Best American Science and Nature Writing." His 2001 book "Barren Lands" is the true account of how prospectors discovered diamond mines in Canada's remote far north. Krajick holds degrees in comparative literature and journalism from Columbia University. He lives on the Upper West Side of Manhattan with his wife and two teen daughters.

Recent Posts

A Snowman’s Toils Under the Sun

One morning, a tiny snowman appears, seated on a bench near the corner of 112th Street and Broadway in New York City. Let’s take a picture every time we go by. Maybe we will learn something.

by |March 12, 2019

It’s Raining on the Greenland Ice. In the Winter.

Rainy weather is becoming increasingly common over parts of the Greenland ice sheet, triggering sudden melting events that are eating at the ice and priming the surface for more widespread future melting, says a new study.

by |March 7, 2019

Scientists Track Deep History of Planets’ Motions, and Effects on Earth’s Climate

Scientists are developing a geologic record of how other planets have influenced the orbit of Earth, and thus its climate, over the last 200 million-plus years.

by |March 4, 2019

Drill Cores From Pre-Ancient Greece Open Insights to Climate

Newly analyzed drill cores taken from the bottom of Greece’s Gulf of Corinth show that sediment flow into the basin has varied dramatically over the past 500,000-plus years, as the earth passed in and out of ice ages, and humans later dominated the surrounding landscape.

by |March 1, 2019

Wallace Broecker, Prophet of Climate Change

Wallace Broecker, a geochemist who initiated key research into the history of earth’s climate and humans’ influence upon it, died Feb. 18 in New York. He was 87.

by |February 19, 2019

Photo Essay: On an Island, a Lost Part of the World Is Found

On the volcanic Indian Ocean island of Anjouan, scientists are investigating a rock that apparently formed on a far-off continent.

by |February 12, 2019

On a Remote Island, a Lost Part of the World Is Found

On a small volcanic island in the Indian Ocean lies a geologic enigma—a mass of pure white quartzite sandstone apparently formed on a faraway continent long ago. How did it get there?

by |February 12, 2019

Upcoming Scientific Fieldwork: 2019 and Beyond

On every continent and every ocean, Earth Institute researchers are studying climate, geology, natural hazards and other dynamics of the planet. Here is a list of projects in rough chronological order for the coming year and beyond.

by |January 24, 2019

The Truly Serious Side of Roadkill

A new film how India’s fast-expanding road networks is fragmenting the few remaining refuges of many endangered creatures. The results are hard to watch.

by |January 8, 2019

Renewable Energy: What’s True, What’s False

A short, handy new guide from the Earth Institute cuts through the noise about renewable energy to lay out the facts about this politically charged subject.

by |January 7, 2019