Earth Institute, Author at State of the Planet

Short-Term Ocean Temperature Shifts Are Affecting West Antarctic Ice, Says Study

Scientists have known for some time that ice shelves off West Antarctica are melting as deep, warm ocean waters eat at their undersides, but a new study shows that temperatures, and resultant melting, can vary far more than previously thought, within a time scale of a few years.

by |August 13, 2018

Internship With Dr. David Maurrasse

Dr. David Maurrasse, adjunct research scholar at the Earth Institute, is seeking an intern to assist with qualitative research. Graduate and undergraduate students at Columbia and Barnard are welcome to apply.

by |July 26, 2018
curbelo carbon tax could dramatically lower carbon emissions compared to current policy

Analysis: Congressman Curbelo’s Carbon Tax Could Dramatically Lower Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Columbia’s Center on Global Energy Policy has analyzed how the proposal would affect the U.S. economy and emissions, as well as low-income households.

by |July 24, 2018
Alex Halliday, director of the Earth Institute

New Earth Institute Director Alex Halliday’s Vision Reaches Across Columbia and the World

The pioneering geochemist tells us his first impressions and why he’s so excited to be here.

by |July 24, 2018
china

How China is Taking On Climate Change

A new guide explores the impacts of climate change in China and delves into Chinese climate policies.

by |July 19, 2018
wind turbine in sky

With a Carbon Tax, U.S. Could Surpass Paris Climate Goals

New report finds that a moderate carbon tax could dramatically cut greenhouse gas emissions, with only minor effects on the economy.

by |July 17, 2018
food in ethiopia

Food Web: Trade Networks May Be Key to Solving Hunger

Columbia’s Center for Climate Systems Research is building a network analysis program that can pinpoint trouble spots in the global food trade system.

by |June 28, 2018

Study Signals Change in How Scientists Calculate Ancient Diets

Scientists have long determined what extinct animals ate by analyzing carbon isotopes locked inside their fossil teeth. But a new study shows that in many cases, they may be plugging the wrong numbers into their equations. The findings may change some views of how mammals, including us, evolved.

by |June 27, 2018
nyc water sea level rise

A World Warmer By Just 2°C Will Be Very Different From Today

Past warm periods indicate that even the Paris Agreement’s limits on global warming could have catastrophic consequences over the long-term.

by |June 25, 2018
child picked up by coast guard

New Online Toolbox Helps Parents, Communities Keep Children Safe In Disasters

If disaster strikes while you’re at work, where will your children be taken? How can you ensure your children are protected?

by |June 22, 2018