Earth Institute, Author at State of the Planet

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Inadequate COVID-19 Response Likely Resulted in 130,000 – 210,000 Avoidable Deaths

A new report finds American lives could have been saved if U.S. government response had followed international best practices.

by |October 22, 2020

How a Turbulent Environment Sparked a Leap in Early Human Behavior

A new study suggests that a series of environmental changes in East Africa some 320,000 years ago challenged a previous long-standing way of life for proto-humans, and produced a more adaptable culture.

by |October 21, 2020

Break Codes, Solve Puzzles and Learn About Science in This Interactive Game

A new “escape room–like” game for kids and families offers a fun and puzzle-filled way to explore the discoveries taking place at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

by |October 19, 2020

Scientists Harness Satellites to Track Algae Growth on Greenland Ice Sheet

To measure algal blooms across large regions of the Greenland ice, and understand their effects on melting over time, scientists are turning to space.

by |October 15, 2020

Methods Used to Reconstruct Ancient Rain Forests May Need Revision, Says Study

One way in which scientists use carbon isotopes found in fossils to identify the sites of ancient rain forests may not work as expected.

by |October 5, 2020

Our Biggest, Best Event of the Year is Going Virtual

Lamont Open House at Home is four days of exciting and informative virtual earth science activities for children, families, educators, and science enthusiasts of all ages.

by |October 2, 2020

Greenland on Track to Lose Ice Faster Than in Any Century Over the Last 12,000 Years

If human societies don’t sharply curb emissions of greenhouse gases, Greenland’s rate of ice loss this century is likely to greatly outpace that of any century since shortly after the end of the last ice age, a new study concludes.

by |September 30, 2020

Project Will Delve Into How Climate and Tectonics Shaped Human Ancestors Over 25 Million Years

A new project will investigate the relationships between tectonics, climate and the evolution of humans’ primate ancestors in Kenya’s Turkana Basin.

by |September 25, 2020

Stability Check on Antarctica Reveals High Risk for Long-Term Sea Level Rise

The warmer it gets, the faster Antarctica will lose ice, and at some point the losses will become irreversible. That is what researchers say in a new cover story in the leading journal Nature, in which they calculate how much warming the Antarctic Ice Sheet can survive.

by |September 23, 2020