FROM THE FIELD
Peering Through Polar Ice

This Bird Flies South for the Winter

by |November 24, 2014
Skier 95 with IcePod visible beneath the rear window lands on the Antarctic ice. (photo R. Bell)

Skier 95 with IcePod visible beneath the rear emergency door lands on the Antarctic ice. Photo: R. Bell

Migrating south in the winter is a behavior that Antarctic scientists share with many species of birds, although the scientists fly just a bit further south. For the IcePod team, it was time to join the migration so they could test their equipment in the most challenging environment the Earth has to offer. After three “equipment shake down” trips to Greenland over the last two years, 20 hours of flight time have been set aside for flights in Antarctica, part of the final hurdle in the commissioning of the pod.

The team arrived early this month at McMurdo Base on a large C-17 to –14°F weather and beautiful clear blue sky as the plane touched down on the Pegasus Blue Ice Runway. The first few days were spent in training for everything from driving trucks in the cold to being environmentally sensitive to the Antarctic microbes to a crash course on interpreting the complex way trash is handled in Antarctica — an impressive 60 percent of everything is recycled. 

Loading the gravity meter on loan from the Kiwi for the Antarctic test flights. (Photo R. Bell)

Loading the gravity meter on loan from the Kiwi for the Antarctic test flights. Photo: R. Bell

The gear arrived soon after the team… first the gravity meter, borrowed from New Zealand, wrapped in a warm, manly pinkish quilt. With many boxes being stacked in the aircraft, the color was selected for its high visibility to assist with quick location and unloading. The IcePod and the equipment rack had paused on their trip down in Pago Pago, arriving a few days after the rest of the gear, but it was all quickly set up and humming in a bright yellow and blue rack tent next to the Willy Airfield on the Ross Ice Shelf. While waiting to fly, a GPS was installed on top of the tent, and equipment was set up to test performance. Both the GPS and the gravity meter measured the movement of the ice shelf as it shifted up and down on the tide ~ 1 meter a day. In addition to the rhythmic up/down movement, the tent, the airfield and the ice shelf are all moving northwards at 30 cm or 1 foot a day.

Scott Brown, Tej Dhakal and Winnie Chu prepare the equipment for take off. (photo R. Bell)

Scott Brown, Tej Dhakal and Winnie Chu prepare the equipment for take off. Photo: R. Bell

Finally, IcePod was cleared to fly and complete her first Antarctic survey mission installed on a Pole Tanker mission flying on Skier 95. The flight was delayed as the C-17 practiced airdrops over the South Pole runway, but as soon as the C-17 was out of the way, icePod took off and headed south.

Icepod flies over the Antarctic ice with Mt. Erebus visible in the background. (Photo R. Bell)

Icepod flies over the Antarctic ice with Mt. Erebus visible in the background. Photo: R. Bell

Low elevation data was collected on the way out to make sure the C-17 was clear. All the instruments worked in the flight across the very flat Ross Ice Shelf, then over the Transantarctic Mountains and across the spectacular East Antarctic Ice Sheet.

IcePod team at South Pole (left to right) Scott Brown, Chris Bertinato, Tej Dhakal, unidentified, Winnie Chu (photo by R. Bell)

IcePod team at South Pole (left to right) Scott Brown, Chris Bertinato, Tej Dhakal, a new Antarctic colleague, Winnie Chu. Photo: R. Bell

The low angle of the sun made the mountains, crevasses and wind scour areas stand out beautifully in the imagery. The deep radar imaged the structure of the Ross Ice Shelf even from 21,000 feet. The infra-red camera showed the variable temperature of the different types of ice in the Beardmore Glacier and the high plateau. The gravity meter that had rolled in on the speed pallet was extremely stable. At the South Pole, Skier 95 offloaded fuel while the IcePod team made a quick trip to the actual pole.

The flight was a success – data collected on an opportune flight and fuel delivered.

For more on the IcePod project: http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/pi/icepod/

 

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