Climate News Roundup: Week of 4/08

by |April 13, 2012

EU CO2 law could scupper global climate talks, Reuters, Apr 11

A European Union law that charges airlines for carbon emissions is “a deal-breaker” for global climate change talks, India’s environment minister said, hardening her stance on a scheme that has drawn fierce opposition from non-EU governments. U.S. airlines have said they would grudgingly comply, but China has barred its carriers from participating unless they are given permission to do so. India on Wednesday formally forbad its airlines from participating having earlier said it would boycott the scheme.

Addressing Climate Change through Diet, Voice of America, Apr 13

A new study says one of the best ways to curb greenhouse gas emissions is to eat less meat. Meat production and consumption are expected to soar by 2050. That’s because the global population is projected to grow from the current 7 billion to 9 billion. But also, the diets of people in many developing countries are changing. Countries with emerging economies are seeing a sharp rise in protein consumption, especially red meat. Dr. Eric Davidson said changing how people eat can have a dramatic effect on greenhouse gas emissions. People in developed countries, he said, already eat much more protein than the daily minimum requirement.

Survey Says Zoo & Aquarium Visitors Poised to Combat Climate Change, National Geographic, Apr 13

Information from a new study suggests that zoos cater to a demographic of individuals who care about the planet and their concern is linked to the connection the visitors have for the animal ambassadors in these living institutions. The final report of a survey submitted and analyzed by the Climate Literacy Zoo Education Network (CLiZEN)–a consortium of AZA zoos and aquariums led by the Chicago Zoological Society’s Brookfield Zoo–indicates that zoo-goers are ripe for learning about climate change and contributing to climate change mitigation.

Tennessee teacher law could boost creationism, climate denial, Reuters, Apr 13

A new Tennessee law protects teachers who explore the “scientific strengths and scientific weaknesses” of evolution and climate change, a move science education advocates say could make it easier for creationism and global warming denial to enter U.S. classrooms. The measure, which became law Tuesday, made Tennessee the second state, after Louisiana, to enable teachers to more easily teach alternative theories to the widely accepted scientific concepts of evolution and human-caused climate change. At least five other states considered similar legislation this year.

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A new study says one of the best ways to curb greenhouse gas emissions is to eat less meat. Meat production and consumption are expected to soar by 2050. That’s because the global population is projected to grow from the current 7 billion to 9 billion. But also, the diets of people in many developing countries are changing. Countries with emerging economies are seeing a sharp rise in protein consumption, especially red meat. Dr. Eric Davidson said changing how people eat can have a dramatic effect on greenhouse gas emissions. People in developed countries, he said, already eat much more… Read more »