wildlife

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When People Must Make Way for Nature

It is the black before dawn at the gate to the Kanha Tiger Reserve, in the highlands of central India. The still air carries a dank, penetrating chill. But it is hardly quiet. A buzzing line of tourists is forming at the ticket booth, peddlers are pouring steaming cups of tea.  Groups of green-uniformed rangers chat… read more

by |July 17, 2017
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Photo Essay: When People Must Make Way for Nature

The forested Kanha Tiger Reserve, in the highlands of central India, is home to an abundance of rare wildlife. It also used to be home to thousands of people—that is, until they were moved out by the government to make way for endangered creatures.

by |July 17, 2017
Kayaktivists greet Shell's Arctic Drilling Rig in the Port Angeles, Washington.

Alaska: Hotspot for Oil and Climate Change

In September, Shell Oil abandoned its offshore oil drilling projects in the Alaskan Arctic. Why is Arctic drilling so controversial and what impacts will Shell’s announcement have?

by |November 12, 2015
A Crabeater seal in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. Photo: ravas51, Flickr.

Antarctica’s Wildlife in a Changing Climate

We hear a lot about polar bears and other Arctic mammals in connection to climate change, but what about biodiversity in Antarctica?

by |October 26, 2015
Male Stitchbird, or Hihi (Notiomystis cincta) Tiritiri Matangi island Photo Credit: Duncan Wright

Finding Threatened Animals New Homes

Translocation in wildlife conservation is the capture, transport and release or introduction of species, habitats or other ecological material from one location to another. The authors argue that many species will need to move to a different location in order to survive. For species that are unable to relocate naturally, the only chance of survival may be to assist them in colonization.

by |September 13, 2013
Photo Credit: Leo Douglas

Wildlife: The Other High-Value Resource

As wildlife trafficking has become more lucrative, widespread and organized over the past few years, the definition of high-value natural resources should be modified to include the commercial values of wildlife and its products.

by |January 2, 2013
Coqui

Reflections on an Ecological Study Abroad Experience

“Everything is so alive in the forest. After a nice summer rain it teems with insects, birds and the famous coquis, Puerto Rico’s native frogs. The song of the coquis take a little getting used to, but they soon lull you to sleep in the humid nights,” says Jennifer Mendez, a student in the first class of the Summer Ecosystem Experience for Undergraduates in Puerto Rico.

by |November 15, 2012
Portrait of Lesula - Photo by Terese Hart

Scientists Discover New Species of Monkey

In a gigantic and remote rainforest of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a team of scientists have discovered a new species of Old World monkey known as the “Lesula.”

by |September 21, 2012
A Puerto Rican Tody (Todus mexicanus) is one of the myriad birds native to El Yunque National Forest. Photo provided by Jason Sturner.

Study Rainforest Ecology in Puerto Rico with SEE-U

The SEE-U Puerto Rico course provides students with a total immersion experience into the ecology and dynamics of a fragile and threatened environmental system.

by |March 13, 2012
Plate 404 of Birds of America by John James Audubon depicting Eared Grebe

Crash Land Home for the Holidays

As holidays approach and we plan our ‘seasonal’ migrations to see our families, many other species are making their own migrations — though with a few more snafus than we humans might hit.

by |December 20, 2011