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Expedition Explores Undersea Rift off Greece

The Corinth rift is one of the most seismically active areas in Europe. Starting this month, researchers will drill into the rift to discover its past and future.

by |October 19, 2017
soil sampling kit

High Levels of Lead Contaminate Many Backyards in Brooklyn Neighborhood

An ongoing study finds that 92 percent of private yards in Greenpoint may have unsafe levels of lead in their soil.

by |October 9, 2017
core repository at lamont-doherty

Ancient Humans Left Africa to Escape Drying Climate, Says Study

Ancient humans migrated out of Africa to escape a drying climate, says a new study—a finding that contradicts previous suggestions that ancient people were able to leave because a then-wet climate allowed them to cross the generally arid Horn of Africa and Middle East.

by |October 5, 2017

Study Bolsters Volcanic Theory of Ancient Extinction

A team of scientists has found new evidence to bolster the idea that the Permian Extinction, which occurred 252 million years ago, was caused by massive volcanic eruptions in what is now Siberia.

by |October 4, 2017

Seasonal Changes in Climate May Muddle Results of Malaria Interventions in Africa

A new climate study shows that some countries in sub-Saharan Africa may be underestimating the impact of their malaria control activities, while others may be underestimating their success.

by |September 27, 2017

How Will Climate Change Impact Ocean Health?

Three scientists explain what they’re learning about the ocean’s changing conditions. These discoveries will contribute to the sustainable management and conservation of marine resources, helping to secure food for current and future generations.

by |September 21, 2017
ocean currents near antarctica

‘Pangeo’ Project Will Improve Access to Climate Data

The better climate models become, the harder it is to use them. One team of researchers is working to fix that.

by |September 13, 2017

Climate May Quickly Drive Forest-Eating Beetles North, Says Study

Over the next few decades, global warming-related rises in winter temperatures could significantly extend the range of the southern pine beetle, one of the world’s most aggressive tree-killing insects, through much of the northern United States and southern Canada, says a new study.

by |August 28, 2017

Fighting Ivory Trafficking with Forensic Science

Last week, just days before Central Park’s big Ivory Crush, a Lamont-Doherty geochemist and his colleague sawed off samples of the confiscated ivory for DNA testing and radiocarbon dating. Their results could determine where and when each elephant was killed—which could help catch the poachers responsible.

by |August 11, 2017

Analyzing Winter Storm Risk and Resilience in a Changing Climate

A new study analyzing storm intensity and impacts in the New York metro area aims to inform how communities can better prepare for winter storms and enhance resiliency as the effects of climate change exacerbate hazards.

by |August 8, 2017