paleoclimate Archives - Page 2 of 3 - State of the Planet

Maureen Raymo

Maureen Raymo Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Maureen Raymo, a marine geologist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory whose name is connected with key theories about how ice ages wax and wane and how sea levels change, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors awarded to scientists in the United States.

by |May 3, 2016

Syria’s Drought Likely Its Most Severe in More than 900 Years

“If climate change is having an impact and is making droughts worse, then we should see this in the record over several centuries—and we do,” said the study’s author, Benjamin Cook.

by |March 1, 2016
The team aboard the JOIDES Resolution collected the first four cores of Expedition 361 from the Natal Valley site. Here, scientists prepare to open the first. (Tim Fulton/IODP)

Sailing into a Storm as We Head for the Agulhas Plateau

The team aboard the JOIDES Resolution just finished at their first coring site off southern Africa. The first results? “Awesome.” Sidney Hemming describes the process in words and photos.

by |February 19, 2016
Jeroen vanderLubbe examines the first cores brought up by the team aboard the Joides Resolution.

6 Million Years of Sediment, Studded with Tiny Fossils

Sidney Hemming and her team have started examining their first sediment core from off southern Africa. It appears to contain about 6 million years of history.

by |February 12, 2016
Bubba Attryde, a core technican, shows scientists on the Joides Resolution the drill bits and other tools. Tim Fulton/IODP

Gearing Up for Our First Cores

As they get to know their ship, the scientists aboard the JOIDES Resolution prepare to drill their first sediment cores along the Natal Valley off the coast of southern Africa.

by |February 8, 2016

Setting Off for Two Months at Sea

Sidney Hemming and the scientists aboard the JOIDES Resolution conduct the final preparations for their research cruise off southern Africa and introduce a girls’ school group from Mauritius to science at sea.

by |February 3, 2016
Collecting ice cores in Greenland. Courtesy of William D'Andrea

Greenland Glaciers Retreating Faster than Any Time in Past 9,500 Years

A new study uses sediment cores to track the expansion and retreat of glaciers through time, and finds that they are retreating quickly and are more sensitive to temperature change than previously realized.

by |December 4, 2015
Jeffany Acosta SSFRP 2015

Spring 2016 Undergraduate Research Assistant Opportunities

The Earth Institute will offer nine research assistant opportunities for undergraduate students during the Spring 2016 semester.

by |December 1, 2015

Shrinking Glaciers: A Chronology of Climate Change

With new data, scientists can track back what glaciers did in the past, and how it is related to climate change. This provides a link to predict what could be happening in the next 100, 200, 500 years.

by |November 28, 2015

Learning from a River’s History to Prepare for the Future

Researchers from eight universities, including Columbia University, are using tree ring and glacier analysis to reconstruct the climate history of the Missouri River Basin in order to give policymakers and water managers better decision-making tools to manage the river.

by |August 17, 2015