Ocean Archives - State of the Planet

Amanda Netburn of NOAA (left) and Doreen McVeigh of North Carolina State University work in a shipboard lab. Photo: Bridgit Boulahanis

Shipboard Science: It’s All About Collaboration This Week

Early-career scientists aboard the UNOLS training cruise are getting to try new techniques and technologies, and collaborations are springing up everywhere.

by |August 2, 2016
Meltwater rivers on the greenland ice sheet. M. Tedesco/Columbia University

In Greenland, Exactly Where Meltwater Enters the Ocean Matters

In southern Greenland in summer, rivers have been streaming off the ice sheet, pouring cold fresh water into the fjords. A new study tracks where that meltwater goes—with surprising results.

by |April 25, 2016

Almost Home, with Another 7 Million Years of Climate History

Science at sea isn’t easy, but the benefits are huge, writes Sidney Hemming in her final post from a two-month expedition that collected millions of years of climate history in the deep-sea sediment from off southern Africa.

by |March 25, 2016
The Alvin submersible, courtesy of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

‘Popping Rocks’ and Robots

It turns out that studying lava flows at the bottom of the ocean uses many of the same methods as studying lava flows on other planets, writes Lamont’s Elise Rumpf.

by |March 24, 2016
Scientists crowd around the stratigraphic correlators' screens. Co-chief scientists Sidney Hemming and Ian Hall are on the right. Photo: Tim Fulton/IODP

Mozambique Core Brings Up 7 Million Years of Climate History

With calm seas, the JOIDES Resolution’s latest sediment core comes up with what appears to be a fantastic, cyclic climate signal that is continuous back 7 million years, writes Sidney Hemming.

by |March 11, 2016
Staghorn coral showing signs of bleaching. Sarah Depper/CC-BY-2.0

Bleach Patrol: Turning Surfers into Scientists to Help Coral Reefs

With coral bleaching spreading, a new project and app called Bleach Patrol is putting surfers, divers and snorkelers to work as citizen scientists, keeping an eye on the world’s coral reefs.

by |March 4, 2016

Exploring Ocean Turbulence: 2016 Sloan Fellow Ryan Abernathey

When you examine the behavior of the global oceans closely—really closely, at scales smaller than 100 kilometers—eddies and jets and fronts start to appear. For Ryan Abernathey, this is where ocean physics gets interesting.

by |February 23, 2016
Sea floor spreading chart by Jean-Arthur Olive

Climate Change Leaves Its Mark on the Sea Floor? Maybe Not

A new study in Science questions the provocative idea that climate change may shape the texture of the sea floor. A Snickers bar helps explain what’s really going on.

by |October 15, 2015

Study Reveals Microbes’ Hidden Role in Fertilizing Oceans

Surprisingly little has been known about how phosphorous, an essential nutrient, cycles through the oceans. A new study has broken through some of this mystery, by showing the hidden role that the oceans’ tiniest creatures play.

by |May 14, 2015

Deep Sea Mining: Out of Sight, Out of Mind?

Are we willing to compromise deep sea ecosystems and biodiversity for prodigious amounts of mineral materials? Will deep sea mining have the largest footprint of any single human activity on the planet? The race is on to create more progressive, environmental regulations concerning deep sea mining, but much more scientific research is still necessary to understand how to best regulate these ecosystems.

by |March 12, 2014