New Zealand

Mineral dust plays an important role in regulating earth’s climate.  Some of this dust comes from mountain glaciers grinding up rocks over long periods of time. (Bess Koffman)

Did New Zealand Dust Influence the Last Ice Age?

Bess Koffman, a postdoctoral researcher at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, recently traveled to New Zealand to collect dust ground-up by glaciers during the last ice age. In this photo essay, she explains how she collected the dust, what analysis looks like in the lab and what she hopes to learn.

by |March 13, 2014
dust plume, Australia, Pacific Southern Ocean

Earth’s Climate History, Written in Dust

Dust blowing onto the oceans can help algae grow and pull CO2 out of the atmosphere. It influences the radiative balance of the planet by reflecting sunlight away. Scientists want to know what role this plays in the coming and going of the ice ages, and how it affects our climate.

by |January 24, 2014
Painting of the Pink Terraces prior to 1886. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.

A Natural Wonder Rediscovered

Scientists using underwater sensors to explore Lake Rotomahana in New Zealand have uncovered remnants of the “Pink Terraces,” once considered the eighth natural wonder of the world. Lamont-Doherty scientist Vicki Ferrini was working with colleagues from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and GNS Science of New Zealand at the site, near Rotorua, to map the… read more

by |February 25, 2011
BLOG 1 waikato

Maori Values; Modern Solutions

New Zealand’s longest river is also its most polluted, but Maori tribesmen have help to offer that goes beyond technology.

by |February 24, 2011