Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Archives - Page 2 of 76 - State of the Planet

A researcher investigates a channel in the Greenland ice

The Greenland Ice Sheet Is Sponging Up Meltwater

As climate warms, the surface of the Greenland ice sheet is melting, and all that meltwater ends up in seasonal rivers that flow to the sea. At least that is what scientists have assumed until now. A new study has shown that some of the meltwater is actually being soaked into porous subsurface ice and held there, at least temporarily.

by |December 8, 2017

Understanding Earth’s Geologic History to Predict the Future

Organic geochemist Pratigya Polissar is developing new tools to look at the history of plants and ecosystems on Earth over the past 20 million years.

by |December 7, 2017
blue sparkles in water

Studying Bioluminescent Blooms in the Arabian Sea

A plankton-like species is attacking the base of the food chain in the Arabian sea, disrupting water quality and killing fish. Researchers at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory are learning how to fight back.

by |December 4, 2017

American Geophysical Union 2017: Key Events From the Earth Institute

A chronological guide to key talks and other events presented by Columbia University’s Earth Institute at the American Geophysical Union 2017 meeting. 

by |December 4, 2017
cows in pasture

Want to Save the World? Start by Eating Less Beef

If we ate half as many burgers and steaks each week, a new study calculates that it could have a profound effect on carbon emissions and the environment.

by |December 4, 2017
lake turkana

The Way We Were: Climate and Human Evolution

In a remote desert region around Kenya’s Lake Turkana, paleoecologist and geochemist Kevin Uno collects fossils and sediments, searching for evidence about past climate, vegetation, animals, and water. His goal: to understand how climate affected our ancestors millions of years ago.

by |December 1, 2017

A Bit of Sun on an Antarctic Thanksgiving

The Rosetta team made two big accomplishments this week: Our lidar returned some beautiful 3D images of the sea ice topography, which can be used to study small details of the ice. And our own Chloe Gustafson won first place in the Antarctic Turkey Trot. She now holds the honor of being the first woman to win the race!

by |November 28, 2017

Greener on the Other Side: ESP Students’ Sustainability Podcast

Students from the MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program at SIPA have produced a podcast called “Greener on the Other Side,” on sustainability, climate change, and the environment.

by |November 28, 2017

Ear to the Ground, Listening for Nuclear Blasts

Seismologist Lynn Sykes has been working for more than 50 years to halt the testing of nuclear bombs. In his forthcoming book, Silencing the Bomb: One Scientist’s Quest to Halt Nuclear Testing, Sykes provides an insider’s look at the science behind detecting explosions, and international efforts to establish a series of treaties.

by |November 27, 2017
Snowy day in Antarctica.

Wind, Snow and Ice: Summer in Antarctica

The theme of the past week has been the weather. Weather is of course always happening, but in the lingo of McMurdo Station, ‘weather’ means ‘bad weather.’

by |November 21, 2017