Summer Program Opens Door to the Life of a Scientist

by | 1.29.2015 at 3:56pm
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For Destiny Torres, currently a biology major at Brown University and a Gates Millennium Scholar, participating in the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory’s Secondary School Field Research Program in 2010 offered her the perfect combination of research and mentorship opportunities, lab work, and getting a glimpse into the daily life of a scientist.

Photo Essay: Fire and Ice Off Cascadia

by | 1.26.2015 at 11:41am
Lamont graduate student Bridgit Boulahanis takes a break from analyzing bathymetry data on the computer to process a fresh core.  (Gene Henry)

A team of scientists traveled to the Pacific Northwest aboard the R/V Atlantis last fall to investigate whether the waxing and waning of ice ages and volcanic eruptions are somehow related.

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Honors Recipients of Science Awards

by | 1.20.2015 at 11:05am
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From October 2013 to December 2014, a total of 49 professors, scientists and students who are part of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory community were recognized for outstanding achievements in their field. The acknowledgements in education and research included fellowships, medals and awards from many of the top science institutions in the world.

Photo Essay: Sleeping Giant off West Africa Awakes

by | 12.16.2014 at 3:41pm
Ricardo Ramalho (Jose Madeira)

Nearly 20 years after its last eruption, in 1995, Fogo volcano off West Africa awoke on Nov. 26. Within a week, it had buried two villages under scorching lava, leaving 1,200 people homeless. Lamont-Doherty geologist Ricardo Ramalho was there to document the action and help advise local government.

Exploring Antarctica by Sea, Air and Land

by | 12.8.2014 at 1:26pm
Lamont scientists Robin Bell, Chris Bertinato, Nick Frearson, Winnie Chu and Tej Dhakal with IcePod.

Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory scientists are among the many researchers currently doing fieldwork in Antarctica. They’re participating in expeditions near, above and on the continent, doing critical studies that will advance understanding of Antarctica’s land and sea processes.

Ice Loss in West Antarctic is Speeding Up

by | 12.5.2014 at 2:19pm
West Antarctica NASA Michael Studinger

Glaciers in one part of West Antarctica are melting at triple the rate of a decade ago and have become the most significant contributor to sea level rise in that region, a new study says. The study found that the glaciers in the Amundsen Sea Embayment of West Antarctica have shrunk by an average of 83 gigatons a year for two decades—the equivalent of the weight of Mount Everest every two years.

A Texas-Sized Block of Ice…

by | 12.4.2014 at 11:20pm
Icepod flying over the Antarctic ice towards Mt. Erebus (photo W. Chu)

The Ross Ice Shelf is the largest of the Antarctic ice shelves, measuring just under the size of the state of Texas. It is several hundred meters thick, although most of this is below the water surface. Along the ~ 600 kilometer front edge of the shelf, the ice towers up to 50 meters in height; a sheer vertical wall of white and the iridescent blue of compressed ice.

AGU 2014: Key Events from The Earth Institute

by | 12.3.2014 at 1:03pm
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Scientists at Columbia University’s Earth Institute will present important talks at the Dec. 15-19 meeting of the American Geophysical Union, the world’s largest gathering of earth and space scientists. Here is a journalists’ guide in rough chronological order.

Why are Past Surface Temperatures and CO2 Concentrations Important?

by | 11.26.2014 at 3:36pm
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By burning fossil fuels for heating, electricity, transportation and other purposes, humans add CO2 to the atmosphere. Yet, by comparing ways in which the Earth’s temperature, CO2 concentration, sea level and ice sheets have changed in the past, we are able to learn valuable lessons about the climate system of today and tomorrow.

This Bird Flies South for the Winter

by | 11.24.2014 at 11:39pm
IcePod team at South Pole (left to right) Scott Brown, Chris Bertinato, Tej Dhakal, unidentified, Winnie Chu (photo by R. Bell)

Migrating south in the winter is a behavior that Antarctic scientists share with many species of birds, although the scientists fly just a bit further south. For the IcePod team it was time to join the migration so they could test their equipment in the most challenging environment the Earth has to offer.