Initiative on Extreme Weather and Climate Kick-Off

by | 2.25.2015 at 10:33am
Extremes event

This week marks the launch of the new Columbia Initiative on Extreme Weather and Climate, a cross-disciplinary collaboration between a variety of centers, research groups and individuals from across Columbia University. The Initiative, led by Adam Sobel, kicked off on Monday evening with a World Leaders Forum panel event in Low Library. Panelists discussed a wide range of science and policy topics related to extreme weather, showing the interdisciplinary nature of the new Initiative.

Webcast Tonight: Focus on Extreme Weather

by | 2.23.2015 at 3:19pm
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The Columbia Initiative on Extreme Weather and Climate brings together experts across the university to integrate research into the physical science of these events with research on their impacts on human society and engineering solutions. The initiative kicks off this evening with a panel discussion, “Preparing for Extreme Weather: Global Lessons from Sandy,” from 6-7:30 p.m. Watch the live webcast.

Bonjour de Nouméa!

by | 2.18.2015 at 11:46am
The research vessel L'Atalante in port in New Caledonia.

Scientists from research institutions around the world are participating in a research expedition aboard the R/V L ‘Atalante to study how microorganisms in the South Pacific Ocean influence the carbon cycle. Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory graduate student Kyle Frischkorn is among them; this is the first in a series of posts in which Kyle shares what it’s like to do research at sea.

Summer Program Opens Door to the Life of a Scientist

by | 1.29.2015 at 3:56pm
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For Destiny Torres, a biology major at Brown University and a Gates Millennium Scholar, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory’s Secondary School Field Research Program in 2010 offered her the perfect combination of research, mentorship, lab work, and a glimpse into the daily life of a scientist.

Photo Essay: Fire and Ice off Cascadia

by | 1.26.2015 at 11:41am
Lamont graduate student Bridgit Boulahanis takes a break from analyzing bathymetry data on the computer to process a fresh core.  (Gene Henry)

A team of scientists traveled to the Pacific Northwest aboard the R/V Atlantis last fall to investigate whether the waxing and waning of ice ages and volcanic eruptions are somehow related.

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Honors Recipients of Science Awards

by | 1.20.2015 at 11:05am
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From October 2013 to December 2014, a total of 49 professors, scientists and students who are part of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory community were recognized for outstanding achievements in their field. The acknowledgements in education and research included fellowships, medals and awards from many of the top science institutions in the world.

Photo Essay: Sleeping Giant off West Africa Awakes

by | 12.16.2014 at 3:41pm
Ricardo Ramalho (Jose Madeira)

Nearly 20 years after its last eruption, in 1995, Fogo volcano off West Africa awoke on Nov. 26. Within a week, it had buried two villages under scorching lava, leaving 1,200 people homeless. Lamont-Doherty geologist Ricardo Ramalho was there to document the action and help advise local government.

Exploring Antarctica by Sea, Air and Land

by | 12.8.2014 at 1:26pm
Lamont scientists Robin Bell, Chris Bertinato, Nick Frearson, Winnie Chu and Tej Dhakal with IcePod.

Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory scientists are among the many researchers currently doing fieldwork in Antarctica. They’re participating in expeditions near, above and on the continent, doing critical studies that will advance understanding of Antarctica’s land and sea processes.

Ice Loss in West Antarctic is Speeding Up

by | 12.5.2014 at 2:19pm
West Antarctica NASA Michael Studinger

Glaciers in one part of West Antarctica are melting at triple the rate of a decade ago and have become the most significant contributor to sea level rise in that region, a new study says. The study found that the glaciers in the Amundsen Sea Embayment of West Antarctica have shrunk by an average of 83 gigatons a year for two decades—the equivalent of the weight of Mount Everest every two years.

A Texas-Sized Block of Ice…

by | 12.4.2014 at 11:20pm
Icepod flying over the Antarctic ice towards Mt. Erebus (photo W. Chu)

The Ross Ice Shelf is the largest of the Antarctic ice shelves, measuring just under the size of the state of Texas. It is several hundred meters thick, although most of this is below the water surface. Along the ~ 600 kilometer front edge of the shelf, the ice towers up to 50 meters in height; a sheer vertical wall of white and the iridescent blue of compressed ice.