Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

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A Game of Strategy and Survival in the High Arctic

EcoChains: Arctic Crisis is a card game for ages 10 and up that challenges players to strategically manage the Arctic marine ecosystem as climate changes, while they learn about the potential impacts of future changes.

by |October 9, 2015

Photo Essay: Rising Islands, Monster Wave

Researchers at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory have published a new study showing that a tsunami of unimaginable size swept over the Cape Verde Islands some 73,000 years ago. The discovery may have implications for the potential for modern hazards.  READ THE FULL SCIENTIFIC STORY

by |October 2, 2015
Storm Surge cover art

How Superstorm Sandy Inspired an Award-Winning Book

“A lot of the challenge is understanding what we as a species should do, because the disasters are getting more prevalent. In the last hundred years, both in human and financial costs, damages are skyrocketing. Most of that is just more people living in dangerous places, but climate change will be more of a factor as time goes on.”

by |September 29, 2015

Tropical Rainfall from Hours to Millennia

Most of Earth’s rainfall occurs in a tropical zonal band that circles the Earth. Understanding how this band will responds to climate change requires us to combine time scales from hours to millennia.

by |September 28, 2015

Ancient Pollen Points to Mega-Droughts in California Thousands of Years Ago

Ancient pollen spores that were in the air when mammoths roamed Southern California are providing new insights into historic droughts in the region, including how a series of mega droughts 25,500 to 27,500 years ago changed the ecological landscape.

Ship crew is deployed to position the boxes of small 'seaworthy vessels' and the tracking buoy onto the ice. (Photo Bill Schmoker)

Arctic Magic: One Research Vessel Multiplies to Hundreds

The Arctic is magical, that we know, but when one ship multiplies to hundreds of small boats we really see the effect that Arctic magic can bring.

by |September 21, 2015
Tree ring research was a young field in 1975 when Ed Cook (above, in Nepal) and Gordon Jacoby founded the Tree Ring Lab at Lamont. The Lab would become a world leader in tree ring sampling and analysis and a source of technology and training for dendrochronologists around the world. Photo by Paul Krusic

Translating Nature’s Historians: The Tree Ring Lab Turns 40

In its first 40 years, the Lamont Tree Ring Lab tracked changing climates around the world, building an international reputation as a global leader in research, training and technology.

by |September 16, 2015
Gisela Winckler (left) and Natalie Boelman (right), winners of Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory's 2015 Excellence in Mentoring Award.

Tips for Being an Outstanding Mentor

What are the qualities that make someone an outstanding mentor? We asked two award-winning mentors and the students whose lives they have changed. This is what they said.

by |September 15, 2015
Map fusion combines night light, population density and elevation data to show the contrast between the densely populated Ganges-Brahmaputra delta and the sparsely populated mountain ranges surrounding it. The urban cores (red) have population densities approaching 100,000 people per square kilometer, while the surrounding agricultural areas have average population densities around 1000 people per square kilometer. Courtesy of Chris Small

A Simple Question, Unexpected Applications – and an Award

Even the simplest research questions can lead to far-reaching public benefits. Consider Chris Small and Joel Cohen’s study of global population by altitude, being honored this week at the Library of Congress.

by |September 14, 2015
Gathered at the North Pole are the crew of U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy and the GEOTRACES science team.  On Sept. 5th at 7:47 AM the ship reached the North Pole, becoming the 1st U.S. surface vessel to do so unaccompanied. (photo U.S. COAST GUARD)

A Week of Firsts for This Arctic Nation

We are closing in on a week of intense focus and excitement for GEOTRACES and for the United States around the Arctic. President Obama became the first sitting president to visit Alaska, the US Coast Guard Cutter Healy with US GEOTRACES scientists completed the first unaccompanied US surface vessel transit to the North Pole, and the first group ever to collect trace metals at the North Pole! You might assume these three items are unrelated, but they are in fact tightly linked.

by |September 11, 2015