Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

A F-35C stealth fighter, similar to one linked to sonic booms off New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Its top speed is said to be 1,200 miles per hour. (Lockheed Martin)

The Earth Shook, but It Wasn’t an Earthquake

Last Thursday, thousands of people on the Eastern Seaboard felt the earth tremble. Seismologists at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory quickly concluded it was not an earthquake, but a military exercise.

by |February 4, 2016
The IODP research vessel Joides Resolution. Courtesy of IODP

Setting Off for Two Months at Sea

Sidney Hemming and the scientists aboard the Joides Resolution conduct the final preparations for their research cruise off southern Africa and introduce a girls’ school group from Mauritius to science at sea.

by |February 3, 2016
antarctic oxygen

In the Southern Ocean, a Carbon-Dioxide Mystery Comes Clear

Twenty thousand years ago, low concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere allowed the earth to fall into the grip of an ice age. But despite decades of research, the reasons why levels of the greenhouse gas were so low then have been difficult to piece together. New research, published today in the leading journal Nature, shows that a big part of the answer lies at the bottom of the world.

by |February 3, 2016
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Upcoming Scientific Fieldwork, 2016 and Beyond

  On every continent and ocean, Earth Institute field researchers are studying the dynamics of climate, geology, natural hazards and ecology, and their practical applications to modern problems. Below, a list of expeditions in rough chronological order. Work in and around New York City and the U.S. Northeast is listed separately toward bottom. Unless otherwise stated, projects originate with… read more

by |February 2, 2016
tropical-storm-nasa-1000x571

Without the Montreal Protocol, More Intense Tropical Cyclones

Using one of the most advanced atmospheric computer models available, scientists compared our expected future with a scenario in which ozone-depleting substances had never been regulated.

by |February 1, 2016
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A New Global Team Tracks Temperature Change Through Time

A new international consortium of scientists is bringing the history of temperature fluctuations across the entire Northern Hemisphere to life.

by |January 28, 2016
Young_Nicolas LDEO Blatnik Award snip

A Prize-Winner Explains His Work

Nicolás Young studies glaciers and ice sheets, and how they’ve changed in the past. His work earned him the Blavatnik Award for Young Scientists last fall, which came with a $30,000 prize. You can hear him talk about his research in this new video, produced by the Blavatnik Family Foundation.

by |January 28, 2016
The Agulhas Current and associated flows. Credit: Arnold L. Gordon.

Uncovering the Stories of Southern Africa’s Climate Past

Sidney Hemming is preparing to spend two months at sea studying global ocean circulation and southern Africa’s climate variability over the past 5 million years.

by |January 27, 2016
ITCZ-NASA

Study Tracks an Abrupt Climate Shift as Ice Age Glaciers Began to Retreat

That change would have affected the monsoons, today relied on to feed over half the world’s population, and could have helped tip the climate system over the threshold for deglaciation.

by |January 22, 2016
manganese

In Isolation, Community

Being aboard a ship is isolating—but for a scientist, it’s not lonely.

by |January 19, 2016