Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Ben Holtzman and the Seismic Sound Lab take viewers on an entirely new sensory experience to see, hear and feel earthquakes from a vantage point inside the planet. Their SeismoDome show returns to Hayden Planetarium on Nov. 19, 2016, with a preview at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Open House on Oct. 8.

Listening to Earthquakes – from Inside the Earth

Lamont scientist Ben Holtzman and the Seismic Sound Lab take viewers on an entirely new sensory experience to see, hear and feel earthquakes from inside the planet.

by |September 23, 2016
redcoral-0813-NOAA-800

Exploring Obama’s Seafloor Canyons by Mini Submarine

Only a few people have ever explored deep inside the seafloor canyons that President Obama just designated a national marine monument. Bill Ryan is one of them. In this podcast he describes what his team saw and learned.

by |September 21, 2016
Participants in Students on Ice listen to scientist Maureen Raymo (top left) discuss climate change at the foot of Greenland’s Illissaat Icefjord. (Image: Martin Lipman/Students on Ice)

Facing Rapid Change in the Arctic

An expedition to the Canadian Arctic and west coast of Greenland is a moving and motivating experience for Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory climate scientist Maureen Raymo.

by |September 15, 2016
On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, two jets streaked through the clear blue sky over lower Manhattan into the towers of the World Trade Center. This photo was taken near the site on the morning of Aug. 11, 2016. At right, the new Freedom Tower. (Kevin Krajick)

A Morning That Shook the World

Seismologist Won-Young Kim heard the first reports of the World Trade Center attacks in his car as he drove to Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, on the west bank of the Hudson River 21 miles north of the attacks. Soon, he was inundated by calls from government officials and reporters. In the initial chaos, it was unclear exactly what had hit, and when; had the seismographs picked up anything?

by |September 6, 2016
Recent winters have had extreme temperature differences in the U.S., with the East facing bitter cold spells and the West exceptionally warm and dry. Photo: Anthony Quintano/CC-BY-2.0

Extreme-Weather Winters Becoming More Common in U.S., Study Shows

This past July was Earth’s hottest month since record keeping began, but warming isn’t the only danger climate change holds in store. Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the simultaneous occurrence of extremely cold winter days in the Eastern United States and extremely warm winter days in the Western U.S., according to a new study.

by |September 1, 2016
Scientists test the water at Lake Tear of the Clouds, high in the Adirondacks of New York. Their testing at the source of the mighty Hudson River in August 2016 was part of a full-river health check from its headwaters to the ocean. Photo: Andy Juhl/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

How Safe is the Hudson? Scientists Test the River, Adirondacks to Ocean

A team of scientists conducted an unprecedented health check of the entire Hudson River system, from its source to New York Harbor. This is what they found.

by |August 31, 2016
A man wades through a flooded Cornwall street after severe winter storms hit the United Kingdom. (Image: Pixabay)

How Does the Ocean Drive Weather and Climate Extremes?

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientists Ryan Abernathey and Richard Seager are investigating how processes in the ocean create extreme weather and climate conditions over land.

by |August 30, 2016
The 2003 Simi Valley Fire ravages a mountainside in Southern California's Simi Valley. Image: U.S. Air Force/Senior Master Sgt. Dennis W. Goff

Drought and Fire Activity: What’s Climate Change Got to Do with It?

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientist Park Williams, recipient of a Center for Climate and Life Fellowship, is investigating the influence of climate change on droughts and wildfires.

by |August 18, 2016
Carrying the lumber down the plank walkway

Construction in the Swamp

Despite the miserable weather and ongoing rain, we constructed a wooden structure to hold the GPS receivers, solar panels and other electronic equipment between the three wells. We worked out how and where to mount the antennas and had parts made to accomplish it. Although I had to leave before it was completed, the team persevered through the storm and now we will be monitoring ground subsidence and sediment compaction in the Mississippi Delta.

by |August 16, 2016
Structure at Well 1, the deepest one, with the temporary solar panel and electronics.

Visit to a Different Delta: the Mississippi

This summer I am in the Mississippi Delta in southern Louisiana helping to install an updated version of the compaction meters that we have in Bangladesh. The environment is quite different and we have arrived in the midst of an historic storm. Luckily for us the brunt of the storm is NW of us. So far, we are still able to work between the rain above and the mud below.

by |August 16, 2016