Infrastructure

broken water pipe

Paying for Infrastructure

Privatization is seen by some as a way of rebuilding America’s infrastructure more efficiently than public sector reconstruction, but experience with privatization is mixed. Sometimes it works well; sometimes it doesn’t.

by |December 28, 2016
From left, Leon Billings, Edmund Muskie and Tom Jorling.

Leon Billings, Tom Jorling and the Origins of U.S. Environmental Law

If you had the experience of hearing Leon Billings teach and tell stories, it is hard to believe his voice is no longer with us. He was a great American and an important figure in American environmental history.

by |November 21, 2016
Ongoing work to connect Loop 303 with Interstate 10 in Goodyear, Arizona. Arizona Department of Transportation/Creative Commons

The Candidates Agree: America’s Aging Infrastructure Needs a Fix

Once infrastructure decisions are made, they are locked in place, often for decades, sometimes for centuries. Recognizing this fact, there is an urgency to think in new ways, rather than simply stick with established practices and systems.

by |November 4, 2016
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Watch: Cities and the Climate Change Challenge

Join us for a symposium on Lessons of Climate Resilience in New York City this Wednesday, Oct. 19, from 6-7:15 p.m. in Low Library on the Columbia University campus.

by |October 18, 2016
Richard Plunz will talk about the newly revised edition of his "History of Housing in New York City" Wednesday, Oct. 19, at 6:30 p.m. at the Museum of the City of New York. For details and to register, visit the museum’s website.

Housing in New York City: Updating the History

“Beyond doubt the large question facing New York housing production today has to do with a market that can not provide for the half of our households that are low income.”

by |October 17, 2016
Change in footprint 1993-2009. Hotter colors indicate more change. Greens indicate decrease. (Venter et al., 2016)

The (Somewhat Less Fast) Growing Human Footprint

The human footprint continues to expand, with three quarters of earth’s land surface now experiencing measurable pressures from buildings, roads, crops, pastures and other human structures and activities, according to a new report. But the report also finds an encouraging trend: In recent years, growth in the footprint has lagged far behind population and economic growth.

by |August 23, 2016
MS in Sustainability Management Professor Carter Strickland

A New Course: Environmental Infrastructure for Sustainable Cities

Read about new MSSM Faculty member Carter Strickland, and how he will bring his expertise in sustainability and environmental policy to the classroom in fall 2016 with a new course: Environmental Infrastructure for Sustainable Cities.

by |August 18, 2016
North Am symposium on CC adaptation FP

Symposium this Week on Climate and Adaptation

This week climate scientists from the United States and Europe will join with officials from government and international agencies at Columbia to share knowledge about climate change and strategies for adaptation in North America and the Caribbean.

by |August 15, 2016
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For Women, a Search for Safety and Community in the City

For most people, home is where you feel the safest. In this post, Kaori Yoshida discusses women’s safety in cities through reflecting on topics of community building, root shock and gentrification.

by |August 11, 2016
Julia Nethero

Participatory Design and Management in Housing: by Women for Women

Julia Nethero explores the shortcomings of urban low-income housing, which fall particularly on women who are responsible for the household’s well being, and how participatory design and management ameliorate those challenges.

by |June 30, 2016