impact stories Archives - Page 2 of 8 - State of the Planet

Antarctica. Courtesy of the Long Term Ecological Research Network

What Happens to Ecosystems When Antarctica’s Ice Melts?

A special section in the October issue of BioScience featuring research by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientists examines the effects of intense melting on two Antarctic ecosystems, tracking impacts all the way from microbial food webs to shifting penguin populations.

by |October 13, 2016

ESP Alumni Gabe Cowles: the MPA ESP Investment

Recognized as a 40 Under 40 Rising Star on the Albany 2016 list, Gabriel Cowles, Masters in Public Administration Environmental Science and Policy alumnus (2009), is the program manager for Build Smart NY, Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s initiative to improve energy efficiency in state facilities by 20 percent by 2020. In just the first year, state… read more

by |October 10, 2016

How Does the Ocean Drive Weather and Climate Extremes?

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientists Ryan Abernathey and Richard Seager are investigating how processes in the ocean create extreme weather and climate conditions over land.

by |August 30, 2016

Project Maps the Chemistry of the World’s Oceans

Until recently, too little data existed about the distribution of trace elements and nutrients in the oceans to provide a global picture. In 2002, a group of scientists connected with Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory set out to fill those gaps.

by |August 10, 2016

Connecting Space to Village in West Africa

A new project, SERVIR-West Africa, will use space-based climate, weather land cover, and other NASA satellite data to address issues such as food security and the availability of fresh water in Ghana, Burkina Faso, Senegal and Niger.

Linking Climate Forecasts, Soil Testing for Smarter Farming

A new project combines cutting edge climate science and mobile soil labs for African farmers and service providers.

by |July 12, 2016

Bridging the Gap Between Science and Policy for Water Security

To tackle the challenge of how to effectively educate important stakeholders about ground water in the United States, 11 graduate students from the Earth Institute and School of International and Public Affairs MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program were asked to recommend a strategy to improve scientific literacy among policymakers and investors.

by |July 8, 2016

The World’s First Seasonal Lightning Forecast

At about 250 lightning flashes per square kilometer per year, the Lake Maracaibo Basin in northwestern Venezuela has the highest annual lightning rate of any place in the world.

by |July 6, 2016

New Study Upends a Theory of How Earth’s Mantle Flows

A new study carried out on the floor of Pacific Ocean provides the most detailed view yet of how the earth’s mantle flows beneath the ocean’s tectonic plates.

by |July 6, 2016
A side view of the June 28, 2016, Glacier Bay landslide. Photo: Paul Swanstrom/Mountain Flying Service.

Massive Landslide Detected in Glacier Bay’s Fragile Mountains

A 4,000-foot-high mountainside collapsed in Glacier Bay National Park this week in a massive landslide that spread debris for miles across the glacier below. Scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory are studying it to improve understanding of landslide risks.

by |July 2, 2016