impact stories

High-resolution settlement data

CIESIN Teams with Facebook to Develop Open, Improved Settlement Data

New high-resolution population data will help us understand better how people are distributed in many countries throughout the world—as part of Facebook’s goal to connect people everywhere to the Internet.

Students work at a small garden designed to absorb rainwater in the Soundview neighborhood of the Bronx, N.Y. They inspect soil cores they left the week before, in order to determine changes in nutrient content. Photo: Nandan Shetty

New York Lets a Thousand Bioswales Bloom

In an effort to curb sewage overflows, New York City has turned to green infrastructure: right-of-way bioswales, green roofs and rain gardens, among other practices. These measures help decrease stormwater runoff by increasing pervious areas and introducing water-loving plants that can absorb some of the water and encourage evaporation.

by |November 22, 2016
New York City Photo: Daniel Schwen

Cities: the Vanguard Against Climate Change

Cities are leading the fight against climate change. Here’s what some of the most forward-looking ones are doing.

by |November 10, 2016
ARC cover 2016 crop for feat

How to Prep a City for Climate Change

Cities around the world already have begun responding to climate change, and a new report from the Earth Institute provides a deep analysis about the risks they face and a detailed look at what some cities are doing about it.

by |November 3, 2016
panel 2

Lessons of Climate Resilience in New York City

The Earth Institute hosted a panel focused on how New York City, and other cities like it, can take steps to become stronger and more resilient in the face of climate change.

by |October 24, 2016
sophia

How a Student Project Helped to Change JetBlue’s Course

What began as research at Columbia University became the catalyst for improving the sustainability of an airline, as JetBlue recently forged a 10-year deal to buy 330 million gallons of jet fuel made partially from plants.

by |October 19, 2016
Antarctica. Courtesy of the Long Term Ecological Research Network

What Happens to Ecosystems When Antarctica’s Ice Melts?

A special section in the October issue of BioScience featuring research by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientists examines the effects of intense melting on two Antarctic ecosystems, tracking impacts all the way from microbial food webs to shifting penguin populations.

by |October 13, 2016
MPA ESP Alumni Gabe Cowles, Program Manager for Build Smart NY

ESP Alumni Gabe Cowles: the MPA ESP Investment

Recognized as a 40 Under 40 Rising Star on the Albany 2016 list, Gabriel Cowles, Masters in Public Administration Environmental Science and Policy alumnus (2009), is the program manager for Build Smart NY, Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s initiative to improve energy efficiency in state facilities by 20 percent by 2020. In just the first year, state… read more

by |October 10, 2016
A man wades through a flooded Cornwall street after severe winter storms hit the United Kingdom. (Image: Pixabay)

How Does the Ocean Drive Weather and Climate Extremes?

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientists Ryan Abernathey and Richard Seager are investigating how processes in the ocean create extreme weather and climate conditions over land.

by |August 30, 2016
GEOTRACES was established to map trace elements and nutrients, from seafloor to surface, in all oceans. This view of the Atlantic shows concentrations of dissolved iron. Source: eGEOTRACES Atlas

Project Maps the Chemistry of the World’s Oceans

Until recently, too little data existed about the distribution of trace elements and nutrients in the oceans to provide a global picture. In 2002, a group of scientists connected with Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory set out to fill those gaps.

by |August 10, 2016