ice ages

Maureen Raymo

Maureen Raymo Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Maureen Raymo, a marine geologist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory whose name is connected with key theories about how ice ages wax and wane and how sea levels change, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors awarded to scientists in the United States.

by |May 3, 2016
ITCZ-NASA

Study Tracks an Abrupt Climate Shift as Ice Age Glaciers Began to Retreat

That change would have affected the monsoons, today relied on to feed over half the world’s population, and could have helped tip the climate system over the threshold for deglaciation.

by |January 22, 2016
Mineral dust plays an important role in regulating earth’s climate.  Some of this dust comes from mountain glaciers grinding up rocks over long periods of time. (Bess Koffman)

Did New Zealand Dust Influence the Last Ice Age?

Bess Koffman, a postdoctoral researcher at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, recently traveled to New Zealand to collect dust ground-up by glaciers during the last ice age. In this photo essay, she explains how she collected the dust, what analysis looks like in the lab and what she hopes to learn.

by |March 13, 2014
dust plume, Australia, Pacific Southern Ocean

Earth’s Climate History, Written in Dust

Dust blowing onto the oceans can help algae grow and pull CO2 out of the atmosphere. It influences the radiative balance of the planet by reflecting sunlight away. Scientists want to know what role this plays in the coming and going of the ice ages, and how it affects our climate.

by |January 24, 2014
Screen Shot 2013-08-08 at 11 02 10 AM

Tackling an Ice Age Mystery

In a new study in Nature, climate scientist Maureen Raymo and her colleagues show that variations in sunlight interact with Earth’s topography and the size of ice sheets to control Earth’s ice ages on 100,000 year cycles. One important finding: as ice sheets grow bigger, they also become more vulnerable to melting.

by |August 8, 2013