hydrofracking

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The Politics of Fracking: Polarization in New York State

While public opinion is fairly skewed against the fracking process, policy actors in New York State can best be described as polarized. Predictably, the pro-fracking group generally disagrees with environmental groups while the anti-fracking group generally disagrees with the oil industry. Policy actors in New York had stark differences in answers on a wide variety of questions.

by |September 26, 2014
Geochemist Beizhan Yan of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is studying the environmental effects. His vest carries sensors to record air quality and noise levels as  he walks.

Photo Essay: Studying Fracking’s Effects, Up Close and Personal

Ten years ago, hydraulic fracturing barely existed. Today 45,000 fracked wells produce natural gas, providing energy for millions of homes and businesses, and nearly a quarter of the nation’s electricity. But scientists are far behind in understanding how this boom affects people near wells. Geochemists Beizhan Yan and James Ross of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory are trying to fill in this gap.

by |September 2, 2014
Natural gas drilling rig in Roulette, Pennsylvania. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Hydraulic Fracturing and Food Security: Can We Have Our Cake and Eat it Too?

What are the implications of hydraulic fracturing on agriculture and food security? In agricultural areas with widespread, ongoing hydrofracking, there have been incidences of livestock poisoning from contaminated surface water sources or grasses, and soil contamination from explosions, spills, flares, irresponsible fracking-wastewater treatment, and leaky gas pipes.

by |March 21, 2012
marcellus

Ohio Quakes Probably Triggered by Disposal Well, Say Seismologists

Earthquakes that have shaken an area just outside Youngstown, Ohio, in the last nine months are likely linked to a disposal well for injecting wastewater used in the hydraulic fracturing process, say LDEO seismologists.

by |January 6, 2012
Hydrofracking makes natural gas more attainable but at the same time puts a strain on our drinking water.

New York Times Raises Concerns about Hydrofracking

An article in the New York Times has prompted debate over the effects of hydrofracking, a means of obtaining natural gas, on drinking water supplies.

by |March 7, 2011