Hurricane Preparedness

adam sobel ocean breeze

Eye on the Storm

Atmospheric scientist Adam Sobel is author of the new book “Storm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future.” Sobel was one of the first researchers to explain to media and the public what might be brewing, before the storm hit. In the aftermath, he looked closely at the factors driving the storm’s unusual ferocity, and how these played against human weaknesses. The book offers a primer on what drives storm systems, and what we know (and don’t) about their relation to warming climate. Sobel also looks into future weather, urban infrastructure and the politics of global climate change. He recently discussed some of his insights.

by |October 14, 2014
sandy ny skyline

Building Resilience: Post-Sandy Resources for Journalists

Earth Institute scientists across many disciplines are playing key roles in helping New York move forward following Hurricane Sandy. Many were already advising the city about the potential effects of sea-level rise, storm surge, climate change and related issues before the storm hit, For better or worse, their predictions were vindicated, and they now continue efforts to help make infrastructure and population more resilient and sustainable.

by |August 15, 2013
Flooded tunnel in NYC. Photo credit: Ruanon

NY State Prepares for Natural Disasters: A Q&A with Cynthia Rosenzweig

Cynthia Rosenzweig of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies talks about the work of the New York State Ready Commission, set up after Hurricane Sandy to study how the state can better prepare for natural disasters.

by |March 13, 2013
Map showing coastal areas likely to have been inundated by the storm surge resulting from Hurricane Sandy in relationship to residential population.

Sandy’s Surge Affected More Than 1.4 Million in 11 States

Based on a model used by the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the map shows coastal areas likely to have been inundated by the storm surge resulting from Hurricane Sandy, in relationship to residential population.