History Archives - State of the Planet

Vernagtferner glacier

The Culture and History of Glaciers in the Alps

Why did Europe’s “cursed” glaciers begin retreating in the 1850’s even though the climate record suggests they should have advanced for another 50 years?

by |April 2, 2018

“We All Cherish Our Children’s Future. And We Are All Mortal.”

It is very important that our politics reflect the universality of human experience as well as the distinctiveness of this place we call America. Let’s treasure our common values and distinctiveness and make a world safe for both.

by |August 15, 2016
Crew aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth deploy hydrophone streamers for seismic mapping of the sea floor. Courtesy of Greg Mountain.

Mapping Land Claimed by Sea Level Rise

Understanding how coastal areas changed as the ocean rose in the past could help communities protect themselves from storm surge flooding in the future as the oceans warm and sea levels rise.

by |August 19, 2015

Preserving the Origins of Environmental Law for a New Generation of Leaders

In fall 2014, Columbia University, through the School of International and Public Affairs, the School of Continuing Education and the Earth Institute, offered a never-before-taught class on “The Origins of Environmental Law.” While many courses teach the fundamentals of environmental law, this course spoke to the people and politics behind the creation of the legislation. The Earth Institute is excited to present a short film providing a glimpse into the importance of this course.

by |May 19, 2015

In Log Coffins, First Glimpses of a Mysterious Asian People

The group traveled by boat, motorcycle and finally by foot through the forest to reach cliffs where burials lay. At one site, 20 feet off the forest floor was a ledge protected by an overhang, where lay a row hollowed-out logs, along with ceramic jars.

by |May 7, 2012