Tag: Global Warming

The Pope’s Challenge on Climate Change

by | 6.30.2015 at 1:37pm
Photo: Jason Farrar

Pope Francis’s broad-ranging encyclical warns that we are destroying our common home and face an immense and urgent challenge to protect it. But it goes far beyond just the subject of climate change, calling for a holistic and sustainable future.

“Faux pause”

by | 6.12.2015 at 10:30am
The global ocean buoy network has been expanding in recent years. Accounting for small, consistent offsets between temperatures measured by buoys and by ships reveals a greater global warming trend than previously calculated for the past 15 years. Image: Maintenance workers on an ocean buoy, NOAA.

New data support the conclusion
The “hiatus” was mostly illusion…

Global Warming’s ‘Missing’ Heat: It May Be in the Indian Ocean

by | 5.20.2015 at 12:00pm
Increases in westward-blowing winds over the Pacific Ocean are thought to be pushing great masses of water--and heat--through the Indonesian straits, into the Indian Ocean.

Since the late 1990s, global warming has stabilized, even as greenhouse gases have risen. That defies simple models that say the temperature should keep going up. A team of oceanographers now says they know where the missing heat has gone.

A Climate Battle Cry for Earth Day

by | 4.22.2015 at 7:00am
Amazon River Delta Courtesy NASA, Johnson Space Center

A group of 17 renowned scientists from around the world are appealing for dramatic action to forestall the worst effects of climate change, issuing an “Earth Statement” that calls for a world powered with zero carbon emissions by mid-century.

Report Forecasts Worsening Climate Hazards for Region

by | 2.17.2015 at 2:54pm
NPCC's updated flood risk map

A new report gives a worrisome picture of climate-related problems the New York region will likely face this century. Temperatures are projected to rise, extreme precipitation and heat waves will be more frequent, and sea level could rise as much as 6 feet.

Climate Change Poses Challenges to Plants and Animals

by | 2.3.2015 at 6:35pm
The mountain pygmy possum. Photo: Phil Spark

Because of climate change, spring, summer, fall and winter in the temperate zones are all arriving on average 1.7 days earlier than they ever have before. The changing climate with its more extreme weather is affecting many plant and animal species, disturbing their habitat and disrupting ecosystem functioning. How will plants and animals deal with these challenges?

The Greening of China

by | 11.8.2014 at 12:41am | 1 Comment
Photo: Asian Development Bank

China became the world’s largest carbon polluter in 2006, surpassing the U.S. But it is also rapidly going green through cutting coal use, investing heavily in renewable energy and launching the world’s largest carbon trading system.

Eye on the Storm

by | 10.14.2014 at 10:47am
adam sobel ocean breeze

Atmospheric scientist Adam Sobel is author of the new book “Storm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future.” Sobel was one of the first researchers to explain to media and the public what might be brewing, before the storm hit. In the aftermath, he looked closely at the factors driving the storm’s unusual ferocity, and how these played against human weaknesses. The book offers a primer on what drives storm systems, and what we know (and don’t) about their relation to warming climate. Sobel also looks into future weather, urban infrastructure and the politics of global climate change. He recently discussed some of his insights.

What Do Wildfires Have to Do with Climate Change?

by | 10.13.2014 at 1:11pm
Deerfire_

“Climate change has been making the fire season in the United States longer and on average more intense,” said John Holdren, President Obama’s science advisor. And, wildfires are not only intensified by climate change, they also exacerbate it.

Why This Climate Scientist Is Taking to the Streets

by | 9.19.2014 at 12:47pm
Central Park

In my early years I didn’t talk about the politics of global warming much. I didn’t bring it up with friends or family, let alone engage in any public way. It seemed to me unseemly for a scientist to be vocal on a political issue related, even indirectly, to his own research. Wouldn’t that be an indication of bias, of a lack of scientific impartiality? But I have changed my mind.