forestry

A new study projects the spread of the destructive southern pine beetle through much of the northern United States and southern Canada. Darker colors here represent infestations in successively later decades. (Lesk et al., 2017)

Climate May Quickly Drive Forest-Eating Beetles North, Says Study

Over the next few decades, global warming-related rises in winter temperatures could significantly extend the range of the southern pine beetle, one of the world’s most aggressive tree-killing insects, through much of the northern United States and southern Canada, says a new study.

by |August 28, 2017
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Beyond the Classroom: Field Visit to Rockefeller State Park

As part of the course on The Business and Ecology of Sustainable Forestry with Professor Ralph Schmidt, students visited the Rockefeller State Park in October 2016.

by |December 8, 2016
MSSM Professor Ralph Schmidt

The Business and Ecology of Sustainable Forestry

Read about new MSSM Faculty member Ralph Schmidt, and how he will bring his expertise to the classroom in fall 2016 with a new course: The Business and Ecology of Sustainable Forestry.

by |July 28, 2016
Land deal dilemmas photo

Navigating Governments’ Obligations in the Context of Land Investments

How should governments address the concerns of their citizens tied to land investments? And do their legal obligations constrain their options for doing so? These are increasingly complicated, and pressing, questions.

by |March 16, 2016
In a soaking rain, Pederson eyeballs a plot through an angle gauge, a forester’s tool for estimating forest density and species composition.

Photo Essay: High in the Hills, Climate May Challenge Forests

Forests in the south-central United States are some of the country’s most productive and diverse. They also sit in a warming “hole”—an area where the progressive rise in temperature affecting most of the continent hasn’t yet taken hold. A team from Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is studying how these forests might shift—or even disappear—when climate change does catch up with them, as expected.

by |March 15, 2016