fieldwork

intern

Funding Opportunities for Travel and Field Research

Applications for the Fall 2017 Global Fellows and Travel Grant Programs are now open! Apply today for funding for your sustainability research.

by |August 8, 2017
Bob Newton, winner of Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory’s 2016 Excellence in Mentoring Award, joins Susan Vincent in introducing student presentations from the Secondary School Field Research Program.

Bob Newton: Building the Next Generation of Scientists

Bob Newton, an oceanographer who leads the SSFRP, an intensive summer fieldwork program for high school students at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, just won Lamont’s 2016 Excellence in Mentoring Award. His students explain how he has changed their lives.

by |September 28, 2016
The Alvin submersible, courtesy of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

‘Popping Rocks’ and Robots

It turns out that studying lava flows at the bottom of the ocean uses many of the same methods as studying lava flows on other planets, writes Lamont’s Elise Rumpf.

by |March 24, 2016
Back at Piermont Marsh, the students make it through the mud to a small test plot with East Harlem teacher Andrew Mittiga. Right to left: Alondra Cruz, Anjelle Martinez, Keylen Lucero, Raquel Penalo, Nick Mapp, Marc Jimenez and Shanon Dempster.

Teen Scientists Team Up with Lamont to Restore an Invaded Marsh

“My experience at Lamont has been great and it’s something like no other. Here I was basically being trained to be like a scientist with exposure to lab work, fieldwork and presentation skills.”

by |August 17, 2015
In addition to depth, we can identify many features in the high-resolution multibeam data that we produce. Most of the seafloor near the shelf break (where the water is between 300 and 500 meters deep) is covered with these irregular furrows that are created when large icebergs are grounded here.

Mapping the Seafloor

One of the goals of this expedition is to investigate if water from the Southern Ocean with temperatures above the melting point of glaciers could reach the glaciers in East Antarctica, and if there are any obstacles on the seafloor of the shelf that impact the ability of such water to reach the glaciers and ice streams.

by |April 20, 2015
Some examples of the sea ice that we have encountered so far. Top left: bands of grease ice, Top right: small pancake ice merged together; bottom left: larger pancake ice; bottom right: The Nathaniel B. Palmer steaming through dense sea ice cover.

In the Ice

Several days ago we reached our main work areas along the margin of East Antarctica. Our expedition is relatively late in the season and the seas around Antarctica are starting to freeze.

by |April 10, 2015
During our transit south to Antarctica we deployed seven ARGO floats (yellow device in picture) for the University of Washington. They drift with the currents in the oceans, measure profiles of salinity and temperature and send those via satellite to researchers on land. They are part of an international effort to better monitor the conditions of the oceans.

Closing in on Antarctica

We are less than a day away from our first study area on the continental shelf in front of the Dibble Glacier. As we approach Antarctica we are starting our science program with a 4500 meter deep CTD and multibeam acquisition.

by |April 6, 2015
Map showing the planned track of our expedition with the modifications made due to the storm systems. Our main study areas are on the continental shelf in front of some major East Antarctic glaciers.

On Our Way: Avoiding the Storm

We are now aboard the R/V Palmer and on our way to East Antarctica. Due to two storms in our direct way we are heading west first to go around the storms and we’ll then head south on their backside.

by |March 30, 2015
Preparing the Zodiac to transport the injured crew member to land.

Adapting to the Unexpected

I grew up outside of Chicago and I wasn’t a Boy Scout, so sometimes I feel like I missed out on learning the type of practical—albeit rarely used—skills that would have garnered merit badges. Now that I’m nearing the conclusion of my fourth research expedition at sea, I think I have amassed a few badge-worthy tricks.

by |March 24, 2015
Sampling in Storm

Sampling up a Storm

I’m writing from where L’Atalante is currently parked, 18S 170W, right in the middle of a giant, anomalously high sea surface chlorophyll patch. Such a high concentration of chlorophyll—a pigment that helps photosynthetic organisms harvest energy from sunlight, and the one that’s responsible for the green color of plants—can mean but one thing in the ocean: a phytoplankton bloom.

by |March 16, 2015