extractive industries

Processing steel slag. Photo: www.loesche.com

At Lenfest, Using Carbon to Help Reuse Waste from Steel Production

Lenfest Center researchers are working with a Chinese steel company on a way to treat and reuse waste slag using carbon sequestration technology.

by |March 9, 2017
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Stranding Equitably in the Current Market and Geopolitical Context

The Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment’s conference of early November will consider, notably, how world production of oil and gas could be significantly reduced in manners protecting the interests of lower-income producing countries, given that staying on carbon budget will require leaving two thirds of our fossil fuel reserves unburnt.

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Tunisia Says Yes to Resource Contract Transparency

Tunisia’s commitment to disclose extractive industry contracts was a critical step in promoting improved governance in Tunisia’s natural resources sector, as well as an important move toward improving trust between the government, investors and extractive project-affected communities.

Pollution from the Summitville gold mine in Colorado led the federal Environmental Protection Agency to declare the mine, whose owner had declared bankruptcy in 1992, a Superfund cleanup site.

Comments to SEC Encourage Environmental Risk Disclosure

Earlier this summer, the Securities and Exchange Commission proposed changes to their disclosure requirements for publicly listed mining companies. The Columbia Water Center was among those submitting comments on the proposed new rules.

by |October 3, 2016
A memorial to the 29 miners killed in an explosion at the Upper Big Branch mine in West Virginia in April 2010. Photo: https://www.facebook.com/ubbminersmemorial

Rules Would Require More Environmental Risk Disclosure in Mining

The Securities and Exchange Commission has proposed changes to its disclosure requirements for mining companies that could increase the liability potential of companies that fail to accurately disclose environmentally related risks to their investors.

by |August 10, 2016
In Porgera, many of the local rivers pass through or near a gold mine. The Kakai River and its tributaries are some of the most heavily impacted. Photo: Joshua Fisher

Drought in Papua New Guinea Heightens Tensions over Gold Mine

In the highlands of Papua New Guinea, tensions between local villagers and a gold mining operation over access to clean water are being heightened by a prolonged drought.

by |March 14, 2016
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Internships Available at Center on Sustainable Investment

The Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment is accepting applications until March 31 for internship positions for summer 2016. Interns are assigned to one or more projects depending on background and interests; unpaid and paid opportunities are available.

by |February 11, 2016
Left: EPS Faculty/Earth Institute Research Scientist Joshua Fisher and Professor Sarah Knuckey from the Columbia Law School work with a translator to explain the results of an independent environmental assessment during a community consultation in December 2015.

Uncovering Impacts of Gold Mining in Papua New Guinea

From late December 2015 through January, a team of Earth Institute scientists and human rights lawyers from Columbia University worked in the highlands of Papua New Guinea to deliver the results of an independent study of water quality and human rights to the indigenous communities living near an industrial gold mine.

by |February 5, 2016

Coal Miners, Extractive Industries, and a Sustainable Economy

The impact of new technologies on jobs is unavoidable, and not all of the news is bad. Many old jobs are destroyed but many new jobs are created. The problem is that with weak unions, global competition and inadequate wage regulation, some of the new jobs are lower paid than the old jobs.

by |July 20, 2015
The executive training program's class of 2013.

Training for Best Sustainable Practices in Extractive Industries

Large investments in extractive industries such as oil, gas and mining have the potential to be a springboard for development, but these investments often have been a source of corruption, social degradation, resource dependency and environmental catastrophe. How can resource-rich countries faced with this double-edged sword make informed decisions about how to effectively leverage these resources? An executive training program coming in June at Columbia University will be tackling this question.

by |December 13, 2013