NYC, Gulf Coast Teens Talk About Life After Disaster

by | 10.31.2014 at 12:28pm
Hurricane Katrina

At the two-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, high school students in New York City posed questions about life during and after a catastrophe to a very particular group of experts – high school students in the Gulf Coast who had experienced the BP oil spill and had lived through as many as six hurricanes in the past decade, including Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Their video project, “The Katrina/Sandy Youth Dialogue, Part 1,” is a product of the SHOREline network.

Lessons From Germany: Can the US Succeed With Its Own Energiewende?

by | 10.30.2014 at 1:44pm
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Last month, M.S. in Sustainability Management alum Katrina Prutzman (’14) was selected to be a part of the Transatlantic Program for Young Technology Leaders organized by the German American Chamber of Commerce. As a member of this group, Katrina took part in a delegation trip to Germany in which attendees focused on the theme of Smart Grid and Energy Storage. Katrina recently wrote about a few key takeaways from her trip regarding ideas that the United States can learn from Germany’s energy transition on Green Tech Media.

Faculty Profile: Sara Tjossem

by | 10.27.2014 at 1:43pm
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For Sara Tjossem, a Senior Lecturer at the School of International and Public Affairs, the MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program is an exciting opportunity for her to engage with tomorrow’s environmental leaders. Tjossem says one of her favorite parts of the program is watching students form professional and personal connections they may not have otherwise made.

An Evening with the Writers of the Clean Air Act: Insight into the ‘Golden Age’ of Environmental Law

by | 10.24.2014 at 9:44am
Leon Billings, Edmund Muskie, and Thomas Jorling circa 1970.

At a panel discussion this week, Leon Billings and Thomas Jorling, two senior staff members who helped craft the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and other major environmental legislation in the 1970s, spoke about the bipartisan effort to pass that legislation, and the partisan divide that stymies Congress today.

MS Student Advocates for Sustainable Fashion

by | 10.23.2014 at 10:20am
MS in Sustainability Management student Ruth Penniston

After working in the University of Arizona’s Laboratory of Tree Ring Research, current Master of Science in Sustainability Management student Ruth Penniston joined the program with the intention of helping to bridge the gap between scientists and the rest of the world. Recently, Ruth began an internship at a sustainable fashion company, Modavanti, where she communicates her passion for the environment through advocating for sustainable fashion choices to the consumers. She strongly believes individuals should be given options for a more sustainable lifestyle and be educated about the benefits these options entail.

MS Professor Looks to Past for Future Drought Mitigation

by | 10.17.2014 at 12:41pm
A dust storm engulfs Stratford, Texas in April of 1935. The drought of 1934 was likely made worse by dust storms triggered by the poor agricultural practices of the time.
Credit: NOAA/George E. Marsh Album

M.S. in Sustainability Management professor Ben Cook often tells his students that the past can provide critical lessons for how we manage sustainability challenges now and in the future. Thus, it is not surprising that Cook, whose research at the Earth Institute’s Lamont-Dougherty Earth Observatory focuses on drought, hydroclimate, and interactions between the land surface and climate system, recently found that the drought of 1934 was caused in part by an atmospheric phenomenon that may also be the reason for California’s current drought. Cook, along with fellow climate scientists Richard Seager and Jason Smerdon, focus on the 1934 drought in a study that was featured by the American Geophysical Union (AGU).

MPA Program Announces Full Fellowship Opportunity—Apply Now

by | 10.17.2014 at 12:30pm
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The Master of Public Administration in Environmental Science and Policy program now offers its first full-tuition grant, the Dean’s Environmental Science and Policy Fellowship. Apply by Nov. 1 for early admission.

MPA Alum Named to City and State’s 40 Under 40

by | 10.15.2014 at 1:38pm
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Alison Miller, a 2011 alumna of the MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program, was recently named one of 2014 City & State’s top 40 under 40 Rising Stars. The media company, devoted to covering New York politics and policies, nominates 40 exceptional individuals each year who are leaving their mark on New York City.

Reclaiming Butte through New Uses for Reclaimed Areas

by | 10.9.2014 at 11:32am
Students taking a walk along the Missoula Gulch, one of the major waterways in Butte during heavy rainstorms. Missoula Creek was one of the places where gold was first discovered, leading to Butte's founding. The mining industry filled the creek with waste rock and mine tailings, which contain arsenic, lead, sulfur, and other toxins. Through Superfund cleanup investment, a 22" soil cap was laid over the tailings and seeded with grasses. The base of the gulch was reinforced with a concrete culvert to reduce erosion.

This weekend, students from Montana State University in Bozeman and Columbia University in New York gathered to generate ideas to use Butte’s reclaimed Superfund areas as more than vast swaths of grassland, but as places to foster community participation.

MS Students Supplement Coursework with Trip to Hunt’s Point Market

by | 10.3.2014 at 10:42am
M.S. in Sustainability Management Professor Lynnette Widder's Hungry City Workshop course sponsored the trip to Hunt's Point Produce Market to give students a first-hand experience of the spaces required for urban-scale resource provision. (Photo: http://bronx.ny1.com/content/news/129480/hunts-point-market-bustles-ahead-of-holiday)

On Wednesday, September 17, students in Professor Lynnette Widder’s Hungry City Workshop participated in a trip to the Hunts Point Produce Market in the South Bronx, the largest produce market in the world. Professor Widder, whose course focuses on understanding urban resource flows in qualitative and quantitative terms, sponsored the trip to give students a first-hand experience of the spaces required for urban-scale resource provision. Located in an area of high unemployment, the market’s use of relatively labor-intensive work flows still makes sense. Around 80% of the market’s employees live in the Bronx.