Earth Science

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Trump’s Budget will Harm the Planet and the Economy

Trump’s proposed budget includes an effort to shrink funding for university-based science research and the national labs run by the Department of Energy. Research on fundamental earth systems science is also cut as is funding for state environmental agencies and national environmental emergency response.

by |March 20, 2017
Global_Temp_and_CO2_400

The Science of Carbon Dioxide and Climate

The vast majority of scientists around the world agree that our climate is changing at a faster rate than ever recorded in human history because of our use of fuels such as coal and oil, so-called fossil fuels. The conclusion rests on basic physics known since the early 1800s, when physical scientists first recognized that carbon dioxide, then a recently discovered gas, could act as a sort of greenhouse, preventing heat introduced by the sun from escaping back into space – the “greenhouse effect.”

by |March 10, 2017
Lamont Strategic Plan

Lamont-Doherty Strategic Plan

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory has been a leader in the study of our planet since its founding 65 years ago. Today, Observatory scientists continue the institution’s long tradition of addressing important questions in the Earth and planetary sciences. 

by |April 17, 2015
The Livingstone Mountains and Lake Malawi (Nyasa)

Seismic Stomp

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory graduate student Natalie Accardo recently returned from Tanzania and Malawi, where she installed seismic instruments in both countries alongside Lamont seismologists Donna Shillington and Jim Gaherty. Natalie produced this video, which shows the scientists and their Tanzanian colleagues conducting a “stomp test” at one of their sites in the Tanzanian village of Manda.

by |August 12, 2014
Lamont-Doherty graduate student Mike Sandstrom uses a high-accuracy GPS to measure the top elevation of a beach ridge (possibly of Pleistocene age), while others look for fossils just below it. These will help Pliomax scientists understand the relationship between the ridge and past sea level. (Photo: Maureen Raymo)

How High Will Sea Levels Rise?

Scientists from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory are trying to determine how high sea levels may rise in the future by studying the shorelines of the past. Led by a team of researchers including Lamont climate scientist and marine geologist Maureen Raymo, the goal of Pliomax is to increase the accuracy of global sea level estimates for the Pliocene era, which occurred about 3 million years ago.

by |May 29, 2014
Beyond Cats

Cat Puns, Scientists and Social Media

Social media plus scientists plus Chemistry Cat puns is a great formula for a talk, right?

by |January 29, 2013
SEE-U Jordan

Expanding Overseas Study Opportunities

A golf-ball-sized rhinoceros beetle flies through the open-air pavilion and lands on my table. I look up from my notes, an attempt at reworking my African wild dog study methods, and realize I haven’t seen one of these mighty beasts since my junior year in South Africa. The beetle is a welcome companion on this quiet, star-studded night in Jordan’s Ajloun Forest Reserve. Creature comforts: another perspective shift made possible by the Columbia Global Centers.

by |April 5, 2012