Tag: Climate

Indian Government Takes Steps on Agriculture, Water, Climate

by | 7.23.2014 at 9:43am
Cabinet Secretariat of India. Image Source: Wikipedia.

In terms of the urgent need to reform agriculture, address climate change and promote sustainable watershed development, the Indian government’s new budget provides for a number of promising initiatives.

A Meeting for the Kullorsuaq Community

by | 7.19.2014 at 8:58pm
Iceberg_sm

It seems that many of the local fishermen have gone to hunt Narwal further north but there are several good prospects for boats that Søren will scout further as several of the fishermen are sleeping as the fishing is better right now at night. With 24 hours of daylight day or night fishing doesn’t really seem to matter.

The Changing Upernavik Waterfront

by | 7.14.2014 at 8:01am
Fishing in upernavik (Photo M. Turrin)

Project Background: Changing conditions in Greenland’s northwest glaciers over the last decade have led to a range of questions about water temperature and circulation patterns in the fjords where ocean water meets the glacial fronts.

Gavin Schmidt Named Director of Goddard Institute for Space Studies

by | 6.9.2014 at 2:15pm
GavinSchmit

NASA has named Gavin A. Schmidt to head its Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), an affiliate of Columbia University’s Earth Institute.

Currently serving as deputy director, Schmidt takes over from long-time director James E. Hansen, who retired last year to open a separate climate science and advocacy center at the Earth Institute.

EPA’s Upcoming Carbon Rules: A Primer

by | 5.30.2014 at 4:17pm | 1 Comment
co2 sources & sinks

On Monday, June 2, President Obama will announce proposed federal rules aimed at curbing carbon emissions from existing U.S. power plants–possibly a landmark in U.S. climate policy. It is uncertain how far the rule will go, and the announcement is being closely watched around the world.

How High Will Sea Levels Rise?

by | 5.29.2014 at 7:59am
Lamont-Doherty graduate student Mike Sandstrom uses a high-accuracy GPS to measure the top elevation of a beach ridge (possibly of Pleistocene age), while others look for fossils just below it. These will help Pliomax scientists understand the relationship between the ridge and past sea level. (Photo: Maureen Raymo)

Scientists from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory are trying to determine how high sea levels may rise in the future by studying the shorelines of the past. Led by a team of researchers including Lamont climate scientist and marine geologist Maureen Raymo, the goal of Pliomax is to increase the accuracy of global sea level estimates for the Pliocene era, which occurred about 3 million years ago.

Climate and the Opal Artisans of the Sea

by | 5.12.2014 at 11:13am
New Picture

Tiny one-celled organisms called radiolaria are ubiquitous in the oceans, but various species prefer distinct habitats. Thus it aroused considerable intrigue in 2012 when protozoa specialist O. Roger Anderson and colleagues published a study showing that radiolaria normally found near the equator were suddenly floating around in arctic waters above Norway. Was this a sign that global climate change was bringing an invasion of warm-weather plankton?

Amid a Fossil Bonanza, Drilling Deep into Pre-Dinosaurian Rocks

by | 4.29.2014 at 1:40pm
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On a high ridge in Arizona’s Petrified Forest National Park, paleontologist Paul Olsen sits on the fallen trunk of a 215-million-year-old tree, now turned to stone. The tree once loomed 70 or 80 feet above a riverine landscape teeming with fish, turtles, giant crocodilians and tiny, early species of dinosaurs.

Photo Essay: Unearthing the Lost World Below a Petrified Forest

by | 4.29.2014 at 1:39pm
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In Arizona’s Petrified Forest National Park, researchers are scouring the fossil-rich surface and drilling deep into ancient rocks to learn what happened during the late Triassic, some 201 million to 235 million years ago.

Celebrate Earth Day with Extreme Science

by | 4.22.2014 at 12:02pm
Polar scientist Robin Bell in the field.

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientist Robin Bell will participate in a Google+ Hangout hosted by the White House on Tuesday, April 22 at 4:00 p.m. EDT. Bell, who will join the Hangout from New Zealand, is a polar scientist who studies sub-glacial lakes, ice sheet dynamics and tectonics in Earth’s polar regions.