Tag: Climate

What Will You Leave Behind? How Personal Legacy Affects Pro-environmental Behavior

by | 1.8.2015 at 12:27pm
Available from: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pedrosimoes7/13910019233

New research from the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions finds that personal legacy can be a motivator to encourage pro-environmental behaviors.

How to Make Good on the Promise of Water as a Human Right

by | 12.22.2014 at 9:00am
jugs

Is the creation of a National Water Framework Law or other stronger national legislation the right approach to creating a more sustainable water regime in India? To answer that question, one has to look at the current constitutional status of water rights in the country.

Linking Climate, Security and Development to Fragility in Haiti

by | 12.11.2014 at 11:11am
Fall 2014 Haiti Dialogue Series focused on climate, security, and development linkages in Haiti where discussants spoke about how sensitivity and perceptions of climate in program design and policy priorities. Photo of Roger-Mark DeSouza from the Woodrow Wlison Center's Environmental Change and Security Program. Photo Credit: Elisabeth Sydor, CIESIN.

As part of the Fall 2014 Haiti Dialogue Series organized by the Earth Institute’s Haiti Research and Policy Program, a group of faculty, researchers, students and policymakers gathered to discuss the latest research linking climate change, natural hazards, development and fragility in Haiti.

Exploring Antarctica by Sea, Air and Land

by | 12.8.2014 at 1:26pm
Lamont scientists Robin Bell, Chris Bertinato, Nick Frearson, Winnie Chu and Tej Dhakal with IcePod.

Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory scientists are among the many researchers currently doing fieldwork in Antarctica. They’re participating in expeditions near, above and on the continent, doing critical studies that will advance understanding of Antarctica’s land and sea processes.

AGU 2014: Key Events from The Earth Institute

by | 12.3.2014 at 1:03pm
corals-linsley

Scientists at Columbia University’s Earth Institute will present important talks at the Dec. 15-19 meeting of the American Geophysical Union, the world’s largest gathering of earth and space scientists. Here is a journalists’ guide in rough chronological order.

Floods, Companies and Supply Chain Risk

by | 11.17.2014 at 9:15am
Thailand_floods_Nov_2011_small

Global companies with long supply chains could do a much better job of managing climate disaster risk, according to a recently published study from the Columbia Water Center.

Eye on the Storm

by | 10.14.2014 at 10:47am
adam sobel ocean breeze

Atmospheric scientist Adam Sobel is author of the new book “Storm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future.” Sobel was one of the first researchers to explain to media and the public what might be brewing, before the storm hit. In the aftermath, he looked closely at the factors driving the storm’s unusual ferocity, and how these played against human weaknesses. The book offers a primer on what drives storm systems, and what we know (and don’t) about their relation to warming climate. Sobel also looks into future weather, urban infrastructure and the politics of global climate change. He recently discussed some of his insights.

The Art and Science of Climate Change

by | 9.30.2014 at 3:34pm
Sebastião Salgado, Iceberg between Paulet Island and the South Shetland Islands on the Antarctic Channel. At sea level, earlier flotation levels are clearly visible where the ice has been polished by the ocean’s constant movement. High above, a shape resembling a castle tower has been carved by wind erosion and detached pieces of ice. The Antarctic Peninsula, 2005. © Sebastião Salgado/Amazonas images—Contact Press Images.

This fall, the photographs of Sebastião Salgado provide the springboard for an ambitious program of panel discussions, lectures and film screenings addressing the urgent issue of climate change, at the International Center of Photography in New York City.

Why This Climate Scientist Is Taking to the Streets

by | 9.19.2014 at 12:47pm
Central Park

In my early years I didn’t talk about the politics of global warming much. I didn’t bring it up with friends or family, let alone engage in any public way. It seemed to me unseemly for a scientist to be vocal on a political issue related, even indirectly, to his own research. Wouldn’t that be an indication of bias, of a lack of scientific impartiality? But I have changed my mind.

Studies Find Climate Change to Disrupt Antarctic and Tropical Ecosystems

by | 8.14.2014 at 3:17pm
Krill shortages will impact Adélie penguins’ foraging and reproductive abilities.

A recent study finds that West Antarctica’s ecosystem is highly correlated to its climate. As a result, climate change will have a negative impact on its ecological relationships, from plankton to penguins. Antarctica isn’t alone – climate change will also affect tropical ocean ecosystems by causing mass coral bleaching.