Climate

snow snowman winter

How Will La Niña Affect Winter in the U.S.?

This phenomenon can cause major changes in climate patterns. See what’s in store for your region.

by |November 15, 2017
In the Peruvian Amazon, a researcher studies a fire set by farmers in order to clear land. (Kevin Krajick/Earth Institute)

Where Is All That Carbon Dioxide Going?

Concurrent with the announcement that human carbon emissions reached a new peak this year, Galen McKinley, a researcher at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, discusses the difficulties of tracking the sources and destinations of carbon dioxide.

by |November 13, 2017
Replacing production of rice with other, less water-intensive crops is one of the factors that could feed more people using farmland that already exists. Photo: Amol Hatwar via Flickr

Swapping Where Crops are Grown Could Feed an Extra 825 Million People

It could also reduce water stress, according to a new study that includes 14 major food crops from around the world.

by |November 6, 2017
heat maps of United States

National Climate Report: Q&A With Authors

Every four years Congress is provided with a state-of-the-art report on the impacts of climate change on the United States. The next National Climate Assessment is scheduled for 2018, but its scientific findings are scheduled to be published today. Here, two of its authors explain what to expect.

by |November 3, 2017
Researchers at the 925-ton boulder called "the bull." (Elisa Casella)

Giant Boulders on Bahamas Coast Are Evidence of Ancient Storms and Sea Level, Says Study

A new study says that storms of intensities seen today, combined with a few meters increase in sea level, were enough to transport coastal boulders weighing hundreds of tons more than 100,000 year ago.

by |November 1, 2017
Kiro samples the walls of the cave.

In Biblical Land, Searching for Droughts Past and Future

Human-influenced climate warming has already reduced rainfall and increased evaporation in the Mideast, worsening water shortages. Up to now, climate scientists had projected that rainfall could decline another 20 percent by 2100. But the Dead Sea cores suggest that things could become much worse, much faster.

by |October 31, 2017
Near the foot of Israel's Mount Sodom, Lamont geoscientist Steven Goldstein (left) and Mordechai Stein of the Geological Survey of Israel inspect a salt cave thought to be 6 million to 7 million years old.

Photo Essay: The Dead Sea, Living Waters and Megadrought

Thousands of years before Biblical times, during a period when temperatures were unusually high, the lands around the Dead Sea now occupied by Israel, Jordan and surrounding nations suffered megadroughts far worse than any recorded by humans. Warming climate now threatens to return such conditions to this already hard-pressed region.

by |October 31, 2017
A jellyfish passes directly in front of the camera.

Under the Sea Ice, Behold the Ancient Arctic Jellyfish

A video reveals mature jellyfish under the Arctic sea ice, where they aren’t supposed to be.

by |October 23, 2017
The sprayer, Caroline Obinju Ocholla, is 33 yrs old, married with 4 children - 5,8,10, and 12 years old. She currently volunteers as a CHV. She is doing this work to help the community but also to save money to help her family. She is motivated by the wages being paid for the work, the respect she recieves from the community (they trust her), her daughters and her spouse who is happy she is bringing in income and supports her. She also says community members prefer female sprayers. Some call her and specifically ask for her to spray their houses. In the future she hopes to be a hairdresser. 
Photo by Jessica Scranton/AIRS

Seasonal Changes in Climate May Muddle Results of Malaria Interventions in Africa

A new climate study shows that some countries in sub-Saharan Africa may be underestimating the impact of their malaria control activities, while others may be underestimating their success.

by |September 27, 2017
In the chilly 24-hour daylight of a spring night, Lamont-Doherty climatologist William D’Andrea surveys Borgpollen, an inland bay on the island of Vestvagoya. Connected to the Atlantic Ocean by a series of passages, the bay once was home to Vikings and their seagoing ships. Some of the islands’ best crop and grazing land is in surrounding hills and valleys, but it was often marginal, depending on weather.

Photo Essay: Climate Change, Sea Level and the Vikings

A thousand years ago, powerful Viking chieftans flourished in Norway’s Lofoten Islands, above the Arctic Circle. In an environment frequently hovering on the edge of survivability, small shifts in climate or sea level could mean life or death. People had to constantly adapt, making their living from the land and the sea as best they could.

by |September 26, 2017