Tag: Climate

On Our Way: Avoiding the Storm

by | 3.30.2015 at 10:24am
Map showing the planned track of our expedition with the modifications made due to the storm systems. Our main study areas are on the continental shelf in front of some major East Antarctic glaciers.

We are now aboard the R/V Palmer and on our way to East Antarctica. Due to two storms in our direct way we are heading west first to go around the storms and we’ll then head south on their backside.

Abyssal Rhythm

by | 3.13.2015 at 11:00am
When sea level drops, pressure at mid-ocean ridges decreases, which may influence the production of ocean crust. A new study suggests that the pattern of hills on the sea floor reflects the timing of sea-level change during ice age cycles. ILLUSTRATION: ADAPTED BY P. HUEY/SCIENCE

Since the dawn of mankind, I imagine we’ve gazed
In wonder and awe at the sky’s starry crown;
More recently, we have been deeply amazed
By the long-obscured, staggering view looking down
To the depths of the sea, through crust, and below…

Upcoming Scientific Fieldwork, 2015 and Beyond

by | 3.10.2015 at 11:24am
Mono Lake Saturday 022 crop

On every continent and ocean, Earth Institute field researchers study the dynamics of climate, geology, ecology, human history and more. Here is a list of expeditions going on this year, and beyond.

Initiative on Extreme Weather and Climate Kick-Off

by | 2.25.2015 at 10:33am
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This week marks the launch of the new Columbia Initiative on Extreme Weather and Climate, a cross-disciplinary collaboration between a variety of centers, research groups and individuals from across Columbia University. The Initiative, led by Adam Sobel, kicked off on Monday evening with a World Leaders Forum panel event in Low Library. Panelists discussed a wide range of science and policy topics related to extreme weather, showing the interdisciplinary nature of the new Initiative.

Birth of a Desert

by | 1.30.2015 at 11:47am
About 10 thousand years ago, North Africa's Sahara Desert was a wide, green landscape. (photo credit: apdesign)

North Africa once was quite green,
From ancient lakes, clues we can glean:

What Will You Leave Behind? How Personal Legacy Affects Pro-environmental Behavior

by | 1.8.2015 at 12:27pm
Available from: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pedrosimoes7/13910019233

New research from the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions finds that personal legacy can be a motivator to encourage pro-environmental behaviors.

How to Make Good on the Promise of Water as a Human Right

by | 12.22.2014 at 9:00am
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Is the creation of a National Water Framework Law or other stronger national legislation the right approach to creating a more sustainable water regime in India? To answer that question, one has to look at the current constitutional status of water rights in the country.

Linking Climate, Security and Development to Fragility in Haiti

by | 12.11.2014 at 11:11am
Fall 2014 Haiti Dialogue Series focused on climate, security, and development linkages in Haiti where discussants spoke about how sensitivity and perceptions of climate in program design and policy priorities. Photo of Roger-Mark DeSouza from the Woodrow Wlison Center's Environmental Change and Security Program. Photo Credit: Elisabeth Sydor, CIESIN.

As part of the Fall 2014 Haiti Dialogue Series organized by the Earth Institute’s Haiti Research and Policy Program, a group of faculty, researchers, students and policymakers gathered to discuss the latest research linking climate change, natural hazards, development and fragility in Haiti.

Exploring Antarctica by Sea, Air and Land

by | 12.8.2014 at 1:26pm
Lamont scientists Robin Bell, Chris Bertinato, Nick Frearson, Winnie Chu and Tej Dhakal with IcePod.

Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory scientists are among the many researchers currently doing fieldwork in Antarctica. They’re participating in expeditions near, above and on the continent, doing critical studies that will advance understanding of Antarctica’s land and sea processes.

AGU 2014: Key Events from The Earth Institute

by | 12.3.2014 at 1:03pm
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Scientists at Columbia University’s Earth Institute will present important talks at the Dec. 15-19 meeting of the American Geophysical Union, the world’s largest gathering of earth and space scientists. Here is a journalists’ guide in rough chronological order.