Tag: Climate

Floods, Companies and Supply Chain Risk

by | 11.17.2014 at 9:15am
Thailand_floods_Nov_2011_small

Global companies with long supply chains could do a much better job of managing climate disaster risk, according to a recently published study from Masahikio Haraguchi and Upmanu Lall, researchers at the Columbia Water Center. According to the study, published in the International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, even as the impact of natural hazards [...]

Eye on the Storm

by | 10.14.2014 at 10:47am
adam sobel ocean breeze

Atmospheric scientist Adam Sobel is author of the new book “Storm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future.” Sobel was one of the first researchers to explain to media and the public what might be brewing, before the storm hit. In the aftermath, he looked closely at the factors driving the storm’s unusual ferocity, and how these played against human weaknesses. The book offers a primer on what drives storm systems, and what we know (and don’t) about their relation to warming climate. Sobel also looks into future weather, urban infrastructure and the politics of global climate change. He recently discussed some of his insights.

The Art and Science of Climate Change

by | 9.30.2014 at 3:34pm
Sebastião Salgado, Iceberg between Paulet Island and the South Shetland Islands on the Antarctic Channel. At sea level, earlier flotation levels are clearly visible where the ice has been polished by the ocean’s constant movement. High above, a shape resembling a castle tower has been carved by wind erosion and detached pieces of ice. The Antarctic Peninsula, 2005. © Sebastião Salgado/Amazonas images—Contact Press Images.

This fall, the photographs of Sebastião Salgado provide the springboard for an ambitious program of panel discussions, lectures and film screenings addressing the urgent issue of climate change, at the International Center of Photography in New York City.

Why This Climate Scientist Is Taking to the Streets

by | 9.19.2014 at 12:47pm
Central Park

In my early years I didn’t talk about the politics of global warming much. I didn’t bring it up with friends or family, let alone engage in any public way. It seemed to me unseemly for a scientist to be vocal on a political issue related, even indirectly, to his own research. Wouldn’t that be an indication of bias, of a lack of scientific impartiality? But I have changed my mind.

Studies Find Climate Change to Disrupt Antarctic and Tropical Ecosystems

by | 8.14.2014 at 3:17pm
Krill shortages will impact Adélie penguins’ foraging and reproductive abilities.

A recent study finds that West Antarctica’s ecosystem is highly correlated to its climate. As a result, climate change will have a negative impact on its ecological relationships, from plankton to penguins. Antarctica isn’t alone – climate change will also affect tropical ocean ecosystems by causing mass coral bleaching.

Ocean Sediments Tell a Surprising Climate Story

by | 8.13.2014 at 11:04am
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Geochemists Alexander van Geen and Jacob Mey helped coauthor a recent paper in the leading journal Science showing that warming climate in the future may not degrade oxygen supplies in some parts of the oceans as previously thought.

Pedaling for the Planet: NYC-DC Climate Ride

by | 8.13.2014 at 10:42am
Climate Ride NYCDC 2013 Day 3_429

Columbia and Earth Institute alumni JD Capuano will be navigating a 300-mile bicycle ride between New York City and Washington, D.C., from Sept. 20-24 to support Climate Ride, the national bike ride to raise charitable donations for and awareness about climate change, cycling, and environmental causes.

Indian Government Takes Steps on Agriculture, Water, Climate

by | 7.23.2014 at 9:43am
Cabinet Secretariat of India. Image Source: Wikipedia.

In terms of the urgent need to reform agriculture, address climate change and promote sustainable watershed development, the Indian government’s new budget provides for a number of promising initiatives.

A Meeting for the Kullorsuaq Community

by | 7.19.2014 at 8:58pm
Iceberg_sm

It seems that many of the local fishermen have gone to hunt Narwal further north but there are several good prospects for boats that Søren will scout further as several of the fishermen are sleeping as the fishing is better right now at night. With 24 hours of daylight day or night fishing doesn’t really seem to matter.

The Changing Upernavik Waterfront

by | 7.14.2014 at 8:01am
Fishing in upernavik (Photo M. Turrin)

Project Background: Changing conditions in Greenland’s northwest glaciers over the last decade have led to a range of questions about water temperature and circulation patterns in the fjords where ocean water meets the glacial fronts.