Tag: Climate Science

The Art and Science of Climate Change

by | 9.30.2014 at 3:34pm
Sebastião Salgado, Iceberg between Paulet Island and the South Shetland Islands on the Antarctic Channel. At sea level, earlier flotation levels are clearly visible where the ice has been polished by the ocean’s constant movement. High above, a shape resembling a castle tower has been carved by wind erosion and detached pieces of ice. The Antarctic Peninsula, 2005. © Sebastião Salgado/Amazonas images—Contact Press Images.

This fall, the photographs of Sebastião Salgado provide the springboard for an ambitious program of panel discussions, lectures and film screenings addressing the urgent issue of climate change. A new partnership involving Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) and New York City’s International Center of Photography (ICP) will present a variety of panel discussions and gallery walk-throughs at the ICP with climate experts.

8 Ways We Can Strengthen Development and Increase Climate Resilience

by | 9.25.2014 at 3:55pm
President Obama addresses the 2014 UN Climate Summit.

President Obama this week announced a set of actions designed to help populations here and abroad develop better resilience against drought, sea level rise and other consequences of a changing climate. At The Earth Institute, the International Research Institute for Climate and Society has been working on these issues for years — making regular climate forecasts, insuring farmers against bad weather, and using data to better anticipate outbreaks of disease, manage water resources and improve forest management, among other programs.

What Everyone Should Know About Climate Change

by | 9.17.2014 at 11:34am
Kroeker_Kristy UC Davis

Climate scientist William D’Andrea of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory asked young scientists attending a symposium last October, “What do you wish everyone knew about climate change?” He turned the responses into this video, which covers the topic pretty well.

Faint Young Sun

by | 8.22.2014 at 10:31am
Image credit: Science online, J.F. Kasting

Through an ancient looking-glass,
Perhaps you’d see more H2 gas,
And if with denser gas collided,
Greater greenhouse warmth provided.

Ocean Sediments Tell a Surprising Climate Story

by | 8.13.2014 at 11:04am
5

Geochemists Alexander van Geen and Jacob Mey helped coauthor a recent paper in the leading journal Science showing that warming climate in the future may not degrade oxygen supplies in some parts of the oceans as previously thought.

What Geology Has to Say About Global Warming

by | 7.11.2014 at 3:00pm
Cobscook Bay State Park, Maine. Photo: W. Menke

The most important lessons drawn from geology are that the earth’s climate can change radically, and rapidly. We can’t say precisely at what CO2 level we’re in danger of melting Antarctica, but that threshold could be reached in 150-300 years, if CO2 levels keep rising at the current rate.

Gavin Schmidt Named Director of Goddard Institute for Space Studies

by | 6.9.2014 at 2:15pm
GavinSchmit

NASA has named Gavin A. Schmidt to head its Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), an affiliate of Columbia University’s Earth Institute.

Currently serving as deputy director, Schmidt takes over from long-time director James E. Hansen, who retired last year to open a separate climate science and advocacy center at the Earth Institute.

How High Will Sea Levels Rise?

by | 5.29.2014 at 7:59am
Lamont-Doherty graduate student Mike Sandstrom uses a high-accuracy GPS to measure the top elevation of a beach ridge (possibly of Pleistocene age), while others look for fossils just below it. These will help Pliomax scientists understand the relationship between the ridge and past sea level. (Photo: Maureen Raymo)

Scientists from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory are trying to determine how high sea levels may rise in the future by studying the shorelines of the past. Led by a team of researchers including Lamont climate scientist and marine geologist Maureen Raymo, the goal of Pliomax is to increase the accuracy of global sea level estimates for the Pliocene era, which occurred about 3 million years ago.

Clock Is Ticking in West Antarctic

by | 5.23.2014 at 12:54pm
supp4rignot thwaites

“The high-resolution records that we’re getting and the high-resolution models we’re able to make now are sort of moving the questions a little bit closer into human, understandable time frames.”

Climate Report Author to Take Questions on Friday

by | 5.8.2014 at 2:17pm
Superstorm Sandy, New Jersey shore

Climate scientist Radley Horton, one of the lead authors of the National Climate Assessment report released this week, will answer your questions in an “ask me anything” session on Redditt on Friday starting at 11 a.m.