Climate Science

Recent winters have had extreme temperature differences in the U.S., with the East facing bitter cold spells and the West exceptionally warm and dry. Photo: Anthony Quintano/CC-BY-2.0

Extreme-Weather Winters Becoming More Common in U.S., Study Shows

This past July was Earth’s hottest month since record keeping began, but warming isn’t the only danger climate change holds in store. Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the simultaneous occurrence of extremely cold winter days in the Eastern United States and extremely warm winter days in the Western U.S., according to a new study.

by |September 1, 2016
Flooding this week near Port Vincent, Louisiana. Photo: NASA

As Louisiana Floods, Measuring the Climate Change Effect

The heavy rains and flooding in Louisiana have been devastating. Can we attribute the severity of it to climate change? How you measure that depends on the questions you ask.

by |August 17, 2016
North Am symposium on CC adaptation FP

Symposium this Week on Climate and Adaptation

This week climate scientists from the United States and Europe will join with officials from government and international agencies at Columbia to share knowledge about climate change and strategies for adaptation in North America and the Caribbean.

by |August 15, 2016
Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. Photo: Hans-Petter Fjeld via Wikimedia Commons.

Climate and Cod

A new study finds that the climatological phenomenon known as the North Atlantic Oscillation contributes to fluctuations in the cod population off the New England coast, and could help fishery managers protect the population from future collapse.

by |July 27, 2016
Intern Addison Bent at work in the Lamont Core Repository. Photo: Rebecca Fowler

A Summer of Hands-on, Minds-On Science

Twelve students from New York and New Jersey are spending July in laboratories at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, working with the scientists. The internship program enables students to spend four weeks exploring what it means to be an earth scientist.

by |July 27, 2016
soildoc video snip

Linking Climate Forecasts, Soil Testing for Smarter Farming

A new project combines cutting edge climate science and mobile soil labs for African farmers and service providers.

by |July 12, 2016
Farmers break into small groups to collect information about traditional indicators. Photo: Catherine Pomposi

Forecasting Climate, with Help from the Baobab Tree

To improve climate forecasts, scientists study the complex interactions and mechanisms within the climate system. But they also need to hear from potential users of climate information, such as farmers, to get a better understanding of how people may use that information in their decision making.

by |June 21, 2016
Dog ticks (left) and black legged or deer ticks (right). The latter spread Lyme disease in the eastern United States. Climate variability can influence the spread of Lyme and other vector-borne diseases. Photo: Jim Occi

The Connection Between Climate and Public Health

International Research Institute for Climate and Society and the Mailman School of Public Health will hold a two-day meeting to talk about how climate influences issues of public health, from heat waves to infectious diseases. The event will be livestreamed, and you also can follow it on Twitter at #healthclimate2016.

by |June 1, 2016
Groundwater pumping for agriculture and other uses has risen sharply. But a new study says it isn't contributing as much as previously thought to sea level rise.

Study Downgrades Groundwater Contribution to Sea Level Rise

Some research suggests that, along with melting ice sheets and glaciers, the water pumped from underground for irrigation and other uses, on the rise worldwide, could contribute substantially to rising sea levels over the next 50 years. A new study published in Nature Climate Change says the magnitude is substantially lower.

by |May 3, 2016
Natural coastal features like wetlands and sand dunes may be able to adjust somewhat to sea-level rise. (Kevin Krajick)

Where Will Sea-Level Rise Hurt the Most?

A study out yesterday says that the lives of up to 13 million people in the United States may be disrupted by sea-level rise in the next century. But another study says that while much hard infrastructure like houses, piers, seawalls and roads may have to be kissed goodbye, some 70 percent of natural landforms along the Northeast Coast may be able to adjust themselves, and not suffer inundation.

by |March 15, 2016