The Climate Epoch

Over the past six decades, researchers have been perfecting the art and science of measuring the chemistry of ocean sediments to learn how ocean temperatures, ocean circulation, and marine biological productivity have evolved. The purpose of this research is ultimately to understand more about today’s climate system and to test numerical models of the future Earth system. In this blog, climate scientist Kelsey Dyez of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory will explore research and recent findings, and also share stories of how scientists go about their jobs and come to such understandings. Above: Model of wooly mammoth at Royal BC Museum, Victoria, British Columbia. Photo: Flying Puffin/Creative Commons

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Why are Past Surface Temperatures and CO2 Concentrations Important?

By burning fossil fuels for heating, electricity, transportation and other purposes, humans add CO2 to the atmosphere. Yet, by comparing ways in which the Earth’s temperature, CO2 concentration, sea level and ice sheets have changed in the past, we are able to learn valuable lessons about the climate system of today and tomorrow.

by |November 26, 2014