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Satellite photo of meltwater from Greenland ice sheet. (NASA)

Fueled by Melting Glaciers, Algae Bloom Off Greenland

Iron particles catching a ride on glacial meltwater washed out to sea are likely fueling a recently discovered summer algal bloom off the southern coast of Greenland, according to a new study. Microalgae, also known as phytoplankton, are plant-like marine microorganisms that form the base of the food web in many parts of the ocean…. read more

by |July 5, 2017
Screen Shot 2017-06-27 at 10.19.12 AM

As Climate Stirs Arctic Sea Ice Faster, Pollution Tags Along

A warming climate is not just melting the Arctic’s sea ice; it is stirring the remaining ice faster, increasing the odds that ice-rafted pollution will foul a neighboring country’s waters, says a new study.

by |June 27, 2017
Oklahoma, OK 8-19-07
Cars drive though a flooded street carefully after heading the High Water Danger Signs.  FEMA has a preparedness program to make people aware of the dangers of driving though flooded roads.  
Marvin Nauman/FEMA photo

Understanding Today’s Climate Politics

The climate problem will be made less bad by technological, cultural, social and economic change that will force political change. Waiting for policy to be the change agent is an exercise in futility.

by |June 26, 2017
Upsala Glacier, Argentina, where scientists collected glacial dust samples. When glaciers move across bedrock, they scrape against it (see glacial grooves in the foreground), and grind it into smaller particles, which may then get blown out to sea. The turquoise blue water of the lake in the background is caused by the milkiness of the fine glacial dust suspended in it.  (Elizabeth Shoenfelt)

Iron Chemistry Matters for Ocean Carbon Uptake

An interdisciplinary team of scientists has discovered that, contrary to general scientific belief, iron in nondissolved particle form can stimulate phytoplankton growth, and that the chemical form that particulate iron takes is critical to ocean photosynthesis.

by |June 23, 2017
Highlands in Ethiopia. Photo from Flickr.

Malaria Risk Increases in Ethiopian Highlands as Temperatures Climb

The highlands of Ethiopia are home to the majority of the country’s population, the cooler climate serving as a natural buffer against malaria transmission. New data now show that increasing temperatures over the past 35 years are eroding this buffer, allowing conditions more favorable for malaria to begin climbing into highland areas.

by |June 15, 2017
The Agulhas Current and associated flows. Credit: Arnold L. Gordon.

Transforming a Passion for Oceans into Discovery

Sustainability Management graduate Melissa Meggiolaro (’17) interviews Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory oceanographer Arnold Gordon.

by |June 9, 2017
The Gulf Stream

Could Climate Change Shut Down the Gulf Stream?

In the 2004 disaster movie “The Day After Tomorrow,”, global warming accelerated the melting of polar ice, disrupting circulation in the North Atlantic Ocean and triggering violent changes in the weather. Could climate change shut down the Gulf Stream?

by |June 6, 2017
CCL Water

How Will Climate Change Impact Water Resources?

Richard Seager and Park Williams, climate scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, discuss how water will be affected by warmer temperatures, and how their research increases understanding of these issues.

by |June 6, 2017
Columbia University Campus

Columbia Affirms Commitment to Climate Action

Columbia joins leaders from across higher education, the private sector and state and local governments in affirming their commitment to the Paris Agreement.

by |June 6, 2017
renewable-energy-sources

We’ll Always Have Paris: Trump’s Impact on the Climate Agreement

While we still do not know the long-term impact of President Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accord, the short-term impact has been to mobilize a broad segment of the U.S. and global public in support of the agreement.

by |June 5, 2017