climate change

The "Ice Pod" instrument array deployed off the side of a military cargo plane over Antarctica. Photo: Winnie Chu/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Lamont Scientists Are Focus of NY Times Multimedia Series

This past winter, reporters from the New York Times went along for the ride with scientists from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory as they flew their mission of discovery over Antarctica.

by |May 22, 2017
A NOAA water level monitoring station with an acoustic sensor on Dauphin Island, Alabama. Such tide gauges along the U.S. coast give scientists a baseline of sea level changes dating at least to the 19th century. Photo: NOAA/courtesy Morgan McHugh

Researchers Model Differences in East Coast Sea Level Rise

For years, scientists have been warning of a so-called “hot spot” of accelerated sea-level rise along the northeastern U.S. coast. But accurately modeling this acceleration as well as variations in sea-level rise from one region to another has proven challenging. Now new research offers the first comprehensive model for understanding differences in sea level rise along North America’s East Coast.

by |May 18, 2017
Sheean T Haley speaking

Why I Decided to Stand Up for Climate Science

A young researcher explains why she is taking to advocacy for science.

by |May 10, 2017
The Waggonwaybreen glacier in Svalbard. Photo: Andreas Weith

The Glaciers Are Going

Glaciers around the world have retreated at unprecedented rates and some have disappeared altogether. The melting of glaciers will affect drinking water supplies, water needed to grow food and supply energy, as well as global sea levels.

by |May 5, 2017
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Is Electricity Use in the Developing World About to Skyrocket?

Cities in the developing world may soon see dramatic spikes in electricity consumption for heating and cooling, according to a new study led by researchers from the Earth Institute’s Quadracci Sustainable Engineering Lab.

by |May 1, 2017
New York City

The Near-term Impacts of Climate Change on Investors

On May 2, 2017, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the Tamer Center for Social Enterprise at Columbia Business School will co-host conference for climate scientists and business and finance leaders to discuss to how a science-based approach can inform and guide investment decisions.

by |April 27, 2017
The recent drought in California is one focus of a Stanford research team's effort to calculate how human-induced climate change influences extreme weather events. Photo: California Department of Water Resources

Testing Links Between Extreme Weather and Climate Change

A new four-step “framework” aims to test the contribution of climate change to record-setting extreme weather events.

by |April 24, 2017
Scientists have discovered that seasonally flowing streams fringe much of Antarctica’s ice. Each red ‘X’ represents a separate drainage. Up to now, such features were thought to exist mainly on the far northerly Antarctic Peninsula (upper left). Their widespread presence signals that the ice may be more vulnerable to melting than previously thought. (Adapted from Kingslake et al., Nature 2017)

Water Is Streaming Across Antarctica

In the first such continent-wide survey, scientists have found extensive drainages of meltwater flowing over parts of Antarctica’s ice during the brief summer. Many of the newly mapped drainages are not new, but the fact they exist at all is significant; they appear to proliferate with small upswings in temperature, so warming projected for this century could quickly magnify their influence on sea level.

by |April 19, 2017
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Webcast Today: Rich and Poor, and the Essence of El Niño

How does El Niño work, and how does it affect our climate, food supplies and water availability? The two men whose scientific work has been key to solving these puzzles will be honored Wednesday with the Vetlesen Prize, marking a major achievement in Earth sciences. And this afternoon, they’ll have something to say about it in a webcast lecture.

by |April 18, 2017
Kelley snip

Colin Kelley: Food and Water Vulnerability in a Changing Climate

Colin Kelley, an associate research scientist with the International Research Institute for Climate and Society, studies regional climate in vulnerable areas like the Middle East in order to improve our ability to make forecasts, plan ahead and become more resilient to drought and other climate shifts.

by |April 10, 2017