climate change

Looking across the Ed Koch (Queensborough) Bridge, June 6, 2011. Photo: Chris Goldberg / Creative Commons

Study Warns of Surge in Heat-Related Deaths in New York City

A new study projects that as many as 3,331 people a year could be dying from the heat during New York City summers by 2080 as a result of the warming climate. That compares to 638 heat-related deaths on average between 2000 and 2006.

by |June 29, 2016
Ocean overturning circulation illustrated. Courtesy of co-author Lynne Talley.

Wind-Blown Antarctic Sea Ice Helps Drive Ocean Circulation

Antarctic sea ice is constantly on the move as powerful winds blow it away from the coast and out toward the open ocean. A new study shows how that ice migration may be more important for the global ocean circulation than anyone realized.

by |June 27, 2016
Photo: Takver

Carbon Pricing—A No-Brainer for Climate Change?

Most economists and policy experts agree that the most effective and cheapest way to curb the carbon dioxide emissions that are warming the planet is to “put a price on carbon.” How effective are carbon taxes and cap and trade programs?

by |June 27, 2016
Martin Stute, a Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientists who will be giving a live-streamed seminar about the CarbFix Project, talks with Edda Sif Arradotir of Reykjavik Energy in front of the piping system that pumps emissions back underground. Photo: Kevin Krajick

Watch Live: Turning CO2 to Stone, Scientists Discuss a Climate Solution

On June 24, a scientist involved in the CarbFix carbon capture and storage project in Iceland will give a live-streamed presentation about the technology and the project’s success at turning CO2 to stone.

by |June 16, 2016
In 2011, cyclone-driven floods hit eastern coastal Madagascar, damaging crops and infrastructure and displacing populations. At the same time the island nation’s southwest was suffering from two years of drought. Food shocks caused by climate-related events can have far-reaching repurcussions. Photo: Bruno Rakoson/World Food Programme

Preparing for Climate-Related Food Shocks

Researchers are investigating if the projected increase in climate change-generated droughts, floods, heat waves and other intense short-term occurrences will result in increased shocks that could jeopardize food security worldwide.

by |June 14, 2016
Asian elephants, like these in Sri Lanka, are sensitive to temperature. A new study explores the impact of warming on populations in the tropics. Photo: Amila Tennakoon, CC-BY-2.0

An Ecological Traffic Jam in the Warming Tropics?

The tropics are already hot, and they’re getting hotter as global temperatures rise. A new study offers a glimpse into how seriously a couple more degrees could disrupt the region’s ecological map.

by |June 9, 2016
Dog ticks (left) and black legged or deer ticks (right). The latter spread Lyme disease in the eastern United States. Climate variability can influence the spread of Lyme and other vector-borne diseases. Photo: Jim Occi

The Connection Between Climate and Public Health

International Research Institute for Climate and Society and the Mailman School of Public Health will hold a two-day meeting to talk about how climate influences issues of public health, from heat waves to infectious diseases. The event will be livestreamed, and you also can follow it on Twitter at #healthclimate2016.

by |June 1, 2016
Trump_&_Clinton

Trump vs. Clinton: What the Election Could Mean for Climate Policy

The outcome of this year’s presidential election could have far-reaching implications for the fate of our planet because the two presumptive candidates, Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump, have very different ideas about climate change. What will they do about the Paris accord and climate change?

by |May 18, 2016
With the right mix of nutrients, carbon-capturing phytoplankton grow quickly, creating blooms visible from space. (Robert Simmon and Jesse Allen/NASA)

Iron Fertilization Won’t Work in Equatorial Pacific, Study Suggests

Over the past half-million years, the equatorial Pacific Ocean has seen five spikes in the amount of iron-laden dust blown in from the continents. In theory, those bursts should have turbo-charged the growth of carbon-capturing algae, but a new study shows that the excess iron had little to no effect.

by |May 16, 2016
A human skull on the left, versus a Neanderthal skull on the right. Photo via Wiki Commons.

The 2 Million Year Melee: Neanderthals vs. Humans

Given their adaptation to cold climes and their advanced, albeit under-appreciated, skills, how were Neanderthals beaten out by their human counterparts? The answer lies in a combination of culture and genetics that enabled the successful radiation of humans.

by |May 8, 2016