climate change

Groundwater pumping for agriculture and other uses has risen sharply. But a new study says it isn't contributing as much as previously thought to sea level rise.

Study Downgrades Groundwater Contribution to Sea Level Rise

Some research suggests that, along with melting ice sheets and glaciers, the water pumped from underground for irrigation and other uses, on the rise worldwide, could contribute substantially to rising sea levels over the next 50 years. A new study published in Nature Climate Change says the magnitude is substantially lower.

by |May 3, 2016
Maureen Raymo

Maureen Raymo Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Maureen Raymo, a marine geologist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory whose name is connected with key theories about how ice ages wax and wane and how sea levels change, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors awarded to scientists in the United States.

by |May 3, 2016
“As the Marshall Islands and several other small island states around the world struggle with saltwater intrusion into their fields and a dwindling fresh water supply, a future abroad is beginning to creep into the minds of local residents,” Eric Holthaus writes for Columbia Law School Magazine.

As Predicted: A Rising Tide of Migration

“With sea levels on the rise, several island nations are scrambling to stay above water and ensure citizens will have a place to go when the ocean engulfs their homeland. The humanitarian-crisis phase of climate change has officially begun.”

by |April 29, 2016
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ESP Alumna Joins Climate Leadership Corps

Olivia Owre-Bell, a recent alumna of Columbia’s MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program, attended the Climate Reality Leadership Corps 31st training in the Philippines this March.

by |April 28, 2016
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Meet Pepperoni the Robin, and Friends

Natalie Boelman and colleagues are tagging American robins near Slave Lake, Alberta, Canada, as the birds migrate north to nesting grounds. In a recent blog post for NASA, she put up videos about their work. You can watch some of them below, or go to the blog page at NASA’s Earth Observatory to see and read more.

by |April 22, 2016
Panelist

Climate Change and the Paris Agreement: What’s Next?

“Climate change is an extreme example of what happens when you do not have sustainable development. We will not address climate change unless we change the patterns of production and consumption that drove us to this situation in the first place.”

by |April 14, 2016
A space robin mascot for the project. Drawing by Nicole Krikun

Migration Mysteries of the American Robin

Ecologist Natalie Boelman is headed back to the far north to study birds—this time to the town of Slave Lake, in northern Alberta, Canada, to track the migration of American robins. She will have some schoolchildren in New York remotely helping her as she and her colleagues get to work.

by |April 13, 2016
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NYC’s Public-Private Partnerships to Fight Climate Change

New York City’s Carbon Challenge is helping to foster public-private partnerships that are crucial in any city’s attempt to combat climate change.

by |March 30, 2016
The crew and scientists of Expedition 361. Photo: Tim Fulton/IODP

Almost Home, with Another 7 Million Years of Climate History

Science at sea isn’t easy, but the benefits are huge, writes Sidney Hemming in her final post from a two-month expedition that collected millions of years of climate history in the deep-sea sediment from off southern Africa.

by |March 25, 2016
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Create a Climate Game—and You Could Win $10,000

Through the Games for Change Climate Challenge, you can be a climate game-changer.

by |March 25, 2016