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The Beatles and the Dawn of Global Culture

The Beatles demonstrated that something foreign could be exciting and worth exploring. We don’t need to make America great again or only think of America first. The Beatles came into being at the dawn of our global culture and I strongly believe we are nowhere near its dusk.

by |April 24, 2017
Students in the “Challenges of Sustainable Development” course presented their solutions for the problem of air pollution and haze in Singapore at Bard College’s Third Annual Asia and the Environment Research Conference. From left: instructor Jason Wong, Annie Block, Chelsea Jean-Michel, Marchelle Lundquist, Elsie Platzer, Francesca Merrick and Bennett Smith.

With a Little Software Magic, Students Create Pollution Solutions

Undergraduate sustainability students explored innovative software and 3D printing to create a set of possible solutions to help Singapore cope with a big problem: haze and air pollution drifting over the city state from burning forests in neighboring Indonesia.

by |April 20, 2017
Leymah Gbowee

How Women Tackle Challenges of Peace and Security

A workshop Thursday will bring together women activists from many communities to talk about how women have been able to successfully influence sustainable peace through everyday activism. The event is being held by the new Women, Peace and Security Program, which is directed by Nobel Peace Laureate Leymah Gbowee.

by |April 19, 2017
Scientists have discovered that seasonally flowing streams fringe much of Antarctica’s ice. Each red ‘X’ represents a separate drainage. Up to now, such features were thought to exist mainly on the far northerly Antarctic Peninsula (upper left). Their widespread presence signals that the ice may be more vulnerable to melting than previously thought. (Adapted from Kingslake et al., Nature 2017)

Water Is Streaming Across Antarctica

In the first such continent-wide survey, scientists have found extensive drainages of meltwater flowing over parts of Antarctica’s ice during the brief summer. Many of the newly mapped drainages are not new, but the fact they exist at all is significant; they appear to proliferate with small upswings in temperature, so warming projected for this century could quickly magnify their influence on sea level.

by |April 19, 2017
Brooklyn Microgrid
Photo: LO3 Energy

Microgrids: Taking Steps Toward the 21st Century Smart Grid

Microgrids, networks of linked energy sources that are connected to the main grid, but are able to operate independently if power is lost, are the building blocks of the 21st century smart grid. Why aren’t there more of them?

by |April 18, 2017
Sus Mgmt conf 2017 DSC09430 feature crop

Transforming Organizations with Sustainability Management

“Trends are always nonlinear. Adoption accelerates because of policy and sometimes in spite of policy. Even if Washington has a different view, businesses and capital markets care about sustainability, and the movement will continue in spite of them.”

by |April 18, 2017
Vetlesen_medal-3

Webcast Today: Rich and Poor, and the Essence of El Niño

How does El Niño work, and how does it affect our climate, food supplies and water availability? The two men whose scientific work has been key to solving these puzzles will be honored Wednesday with the Vetlesen Prize, marking a major achievement in Earth sciences. And this afternoon, they’ll have something to say about it in a webcast lecture.

by |April 18, 2017
sat image water vapor NOAA 20

Our Economy Depends on Earth Observation and Scientific Research

If we are to continue to grow our economy without destroying the planet’s basic systems that sustain human life, we need to learn a great deal more about our planet and the impact of human activities on natural systems.

by |April 17, 2017
Polissar snip

Pratigya Polissar Sees Landscapes Changing Through a Microscope

The word fossils typically conjures images of T-Rexes and trilobites. Pratigya Polissar thinks micro: A paleoclimatologist, he digs into old sediments and studies molecular fossils—the microscopic remains of plants and animals that can tell us a lot about what was living in a particular time period.

by |April 17, 2017
teaching assistant snip

Fall 2017 Teaching Assistant Positions Open

The Undergraduate Program in Sustainable Development is currently accepting applications for fall semester 2017 teaching assistant positions. Applicants must be current full-time Columbia University students enrolled in a degree granting program. Applications will only be accepted by graduate students and undergraduate juniors or seniors.

by |April 12, 2017