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The Coming Great Quakes in India and Bangladesh?

A new film takes viewers from the eastern highlands of India to the booming lowland metropolis of Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh–and explores an ever-more detailed picture of catastrophic earthquake threat that scientists are discovering under the region.

by |October 18, 2016

Don’t Be Bewitched by Paris Climate Change Deal

“We can and should develop other agreements that ask countries to coordinate their actions rather than to reduce their emissions voluntarily. Countries are good at coordination, and not so good at volunteering to act in their collective interests.”

by |October 17, 2016
Richard Plunz will talk about the newly revised edition of his "History of Housing in New York City" Wednesday, Oct. 19, at 6:30 p.m. at the Museum of the City of New York. For details and to register, visit the museum’s website.

Housing in New York City: Updating the History

“Beyond doubt the large question facing New York housing production today has to do with a market that can not provide for the half of our households that are low income.”

by |October 17, 2016

No Free Passes: Making Renewable Energy Responsible

As the world rushes to invest in clean energy, the potential impacts of these projects on the rights of local individuals and communities need to be properly addressed.

Grad student Daniel Rasmussen drew a big crowd for the volcano simulations. This one is a concoction of Mentos and Diet Coke.

Getting Hands-On with Science at Lamont: Open House 2016

Thousands of visitors toured the labs and crowded around demonstrations at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory’s Open House on Saturday, often jumping in to help.

by |October 14, 2016

Leaving Fossil Fuels in the Ground: Who, What and When?

In order to promote a broader conversation on the issue of equity and stranded assets, Oxfam recently released a report discussing whether there is a reasonable case to be made that developing countries should get preferential treatment so that they bear less of the burden when it comes to having their assets stranded.

Robin Bell will serve as AGU president-elect for two years, then become AGU president in 2019. Photo: Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Lamont’s Robin Bell Chosen as AGU President-Elect

The American Geophysical Union election results are in, and three Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientists will be taking key leadership roles in the internationally influential Earth and space sciences organization.

by |October 13, 2016
Antarctica. Courtesy of the Long Term Ecological Research Network

What Happens to Ecosystems When Antarctica’s Ice Melts?

A special section in the October issue of BioScience featuring research by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientists examines the effects of intense melting on two Antarctic ecosystems, tracking impacts all the way from microbial food webs to shifting penguin populations.

by |October 13, 2016

Stranding Equitably in the Current Market and Geopolitical Context

The Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment’s conference of early November will consider, notably, how world production of oil and gas could be significantly reduced in manners protecting the interests of lower-income producing countries, given that staying on carbon budget will require leaving two thirds of our fossil fuel reserves unburnt.

Hoover Dam. Photo: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

Dammed Funding for U.S. Dams

Across the nation, large-scale water infrastructure such as dams have provided a multitude of services, from electric power and water reservoirs to flood control and containment of pollution. But federal investments in large water infrastructure projects have largely been curtailed over the past few decades.

by |October 12, 2016