‘Thumbs Up’ for Travel to Kullorsuaq

by | 7.17.2014 at 5:46pm
Landing at the Kullorsuaq ‘helipad’. The helipad is surrounded by canisters of gasoline used to refuel for the return leg. The local transport of luggage and gear is a front loader that delivers the gear to your door. (Photo M. Turrin)

At the small airport a smiling woman approaches us asking our plans in one word “Kullorsuaq?” We smile and nod and she grins broadly motioning that she and her daughter are going there too – it is their home she manages to convey.

The Son of a Hunter

by | 7.14.2014 at 10:36pm | 4 Comments
Greenland seal carving (Photo M. Turrin)

A visit to the Upernavik museum brought us to ‘Edvard’ a young Greenlandic and the local museum curator. Embracing the opportunity to practice his English he enthusiastically spent time sharing the historic art and past of the community and his experiences as a young adult growing up in a Greenland that is shifting from one set of cultural norms to another.

The Changing Upernavik Waterfront

by | 7.14.2014 at 8:01am
Fishing in upernavik (Photo M. Turrin)

Project Background: Changing conditions in Greenland’s northwest glaciers over the last decade have led to a range of questions about water temperature and circulation patterns in the fjords where ocean water meets the glacial fronts.

What Geology Has to Say About Global Warming

by | 7.11.2014 at 3:00pm
Cobscook Bay State Park, Maine. Photo: W. Menke

The most important lessons drawn from geology are that the earth’s climate can change radically and that the pace of change can be rapid. The precision of measurement is currently too poor to give an exact answer to a critical question, At what carbon dioxide level are we in danger of melting Antarctica? However, while crude, these estimates suggest that this threshold will be reached in 150-300 years, if carbon dioxide levels continue to rise at the current rate.

Iron Fingerprints

by | 7.11.2014 at 1:20am
Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC (reposted from Nature.com)

  Metals galore in deep Earth, But at the sea surface, a dearth. Iron is key For greening the sea … To planktic cells, gold has less worth.

MPA Students Discover the Gowanus Canal and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

by | 7.10.2014 at 4:45pm
lamont rock

The students in the newest MPA in Environmental Science and Policy cohort have spent the summer semester focusing on climatology, environmental chemistry, and ecology while supplementing classroom learning with field trips around New York. The field trips allow the 60 students to look at classroom topics in a real-world context.

Glacier Marks on Mount Chirripó

by | 7.9.2014 at 4:39pm
Max 7.2

On his sixth day on Mount Chirripo, Lamont’s Max Cunningham finds clues of the mountain’s origins and evolution.