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Photo: Joe Brusky

For Climate Change, Carbon Pricing is No Silver Bullet

Many economists and policy experts believe carbon pricing is the most effective way to deal with global warming. But others argue that carbon pricing is not a silver bullet for dealing with climate change. Here’s why.

by |July 18, 2016
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Connecting Space to Village in West Africa

A new project, SERVIR-West Africa, will use space-based climate, weather land cover, and other NASA satellite data to address issues such as food security and the availability of fresh water in Ghana, Burkina Faso, Senegal and Niger.

Christopher Lewis 2

Balancing Development and Preservation in an Urban National Park

Nairobi National Park is the only wildlife park in the world within a city’s administrative boundaries. However, the park’s value to its greater ecosystem, as well as its role in promoting conservation throughout Kenya, are under threat due to recent urban and infrastructure developments.

by |July 14, 2016
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Linking Climate Forecasts, Soil Testing for Smarter Farming

A new project combines cutting edge climate science and mobile soil labs for African farmers and service providers.

by |July 12, 2016
Bento Rodrigues, destroyed by a flood of chemical-laced water and sludge after a tailings dam collapsed in Brazil in November 2015.

Shareholder Litigation Puts a Spotlight on Environmental Risk

Lawsuits based on corporate misrepresentations to investors are gaining attention from those who want to see companies held more accountable for environmental damage–including risks associated with climate change.

by |July 11, 2016
This map shows the amount of water stored in underground aquifers in the continental U.S for the year 2014. The baseline is the average water stored between the years 1948-2009. Source: NASA.

Bridging the Gap Between Science and Policy for Water Security

To tackle the challenge of how to effectively educate important stakeholders about ground water in the United States, 11 graduate students from the Earth Institute and School of International and Public Affairs MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program were asked to recommend a strategy to improve scientific literacy among policymakers and investors.

by |July 8, 2016
Professor Park Williams explains the process of studying tree rings to understand how trees are reacting to climate change

MPA ESP Students Tour Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory

Students from Columbia University’s MPA Environmental Science and Policy program recently visited the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory on June 27 to learn about the ground-breaking research being carried out at one of the world’s leading research centers for climate and the environment.

by |July 8, 2016
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Fall 2016 MSSM Curriculum and Grading Assistant Positions

The Sustainability Management program is seeking candidates for curriculum and grading assistant positions for the fall 2016 sessions. Responsibilities include updating information in Canvas, reviewing course material with the instructor, and assisting in the grading of problem sets and examinations.

by |July 7, 2016
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The World’s First Seasonal Lightning Forecast

At about 250 lightning flashes per square kilometer per year, the Lake Maracaibo Basin in northwestern Venezuela has the highest annual lightning rate of any place in the world.

by |July 6, 2016
Illustrations show how (a) pressure gradient-driven flow and (b) density-driven small-scale convection could work in the asthenosphere. At the top is the surface view showing the locations of the NoMelt seismometers. The red arrows indicated the flow direction.  (Lin et al., Nature 2016)

New Study Upends a Theory of How Earth’s Mantle Flows

A new study carried out on the floor of Pacific Ocean provides the most detailed view yet of how the earth’s mantle flows beneath the ocean’s tectonic plates.

by |July 6, 2016