Press Release

Researchers have discovered a region of highly compacted sediments that could increase earthquake and tsunami danger off Washington and northern Oregon. (Courtesy University of Texas Institute for Geophysics

Ocean Sediments Off Pacific Coast May Feed Tsunami Danger

Tightly packed sediments help the Cascadia Subduction Zone generate large earthquakes, and could boost its ability to trigger a large tsunami.

by |November 20, 2017
Replacing production of rice with other, less water-intensive crops is one of the factors that could feed more people using farmland that already exists. Photo: Amol Hatwar via Flickr

Swapping Where Crops are Grown Could Feed an Extra 825 Million People

It could also reduce water stress, according to a new study that includes 14 major food crops from around the world.

by |November 6, 2017
core repository at lamont-doherty

Ancient Humans Left Africa to Escape Drying Climate, Says Study

Ancient humans migrated out of Africa to escape a drying climate, says a new study—a finding that contradicts previous suggestions that ancient people were able to leave because a then-wet climate allowed them to cross the generally arid Horn of Africa and Middle East.

by |October 5, 2017
A researcher climbs a deposit left by massive volcanism in what is now Siberia 252 million years ago. The eruptions may have led to catastrophic environmental changes, says a new study. (Courtesy Linda Elkins-Tanton)

Study Bolsters Volcanic Theory of Ancient Extinction

A team of scientists has found new evidence to bolster the idea that the Permian Extinction, which occurred 252 million years ago, was caused by massive volcanic eruptions in what is now Siberia.

by |October 4, 2017
The sprayer, Caroline Obinju Ocholla, is 33 yrs old, married with 4 children - 5,8,10, and 12 years old. She currently volunteers as a CHV. She is doing this work to help the community but also to save money to help her family. She is motivated by the wages being paid for the work, the respect she recieves from the community (they trust her), her daughters and her spouse who is happy she is bringing in income and supports her. She also says community members prefer female sprayers. Some call her and specifically ask for her to spray their houses. In the future she hopes to be a hairdresser. 
Photo by Jessica Scranton/AIRS

Seasonal Changes in Climate May Muddle Results of Malaria Interventions in Africa

A new climate study shows that some countries in sub-Saharan Africa may be underestimating the impact of their malaria control activities, while others may be underestimating their success.

by |September 27, 2017
power lines at sunset

Climate Change Could Spell Trouble for Europe’s Electrical Grid

Peak demand for electricity is expected to shift from winter to summer, and from Northern Europe to the South—changes that could strain the region’s infrastructure.

by |August 28, 2017
A new study projects the spread of the destructive southern pine beetle through much of the northern United States and southern Canada. Darker colors here represent infestations in successively later decades. (Lesk et al., 2017)

Climate May Quickly Drive Forest-Eating Beetles North, Says Study

Over the next few decades, global warming-related rises in winter temperatures could significantly extend the range of the southern pine beetle, one of the world’s most aggressive tree-killing insects, through much of the northern United States and southern Canada, says a new study.

by |August 28, 2017
tropical storm harvey forming in the gulf of mexico

Hurricane Harvey: Resources for Journalists

Earth Institute experts are on-hand to answer media questions about hurricane physics, rapid intensification, emergency response, and more.

by |August 24, 2017
Team members taking a short ice core to study properties of sediment coming from the East Antarctic ice sheet. (Photo: Mike Kaplan)

East Antarctic Ice Sheet Should Remain Stable Even if the West Melts

A new look inside the ice sheet validates predictions that it probably won’t melt as quickly as its neighbor—good news, since East Antarctica contains enough water to raise sea levels by 200 feet.

by |August 18, 2017
A tsunami can occur as ocean crust (brown area) dives under continental crust (orange), causing the ocean floor to suddenly moves. In one region off Alaska, researchers have found a large fault and other evidence indicating that the leading edge of the continental  crust has split off, creating an area that can move more efficiently, and thus may be more tsunami-prone. (Anne Becel)

New Images From Under Alaska Seafloor Suggest High Tsunami Danger

Scientists probing under the seafloor off Alaska have mapped a geologic structure that they say signals potential for a major tsunami in an area that normally would be considered benign.

by |July 31, 2017