Press Release

power lines at sunset

Climate Change Could Spell Trouble for Europe’s Electrical Grid

Peak demand for electricity is expected to shift from winter to summer, and from Northern Europe to the South—changes that could strain the region’s infrastructure.

by |August 28, 2017
A new study projects the spread of the destructive southern pine beetle through much of the northern United States and southern Canada. Darker colors here represent infestations in successively later decades. (Lesk et al., 2017)

Climate May Quickly Drive Forest-Eating Beetles North, Says Study

Over the next few decades, global warming-related rises in winter temperatures could significantly extend the range of the southern pine beetle, one of the world’s most aggressive tree-killing insects, through much of the northern United States and southern Canada, says a new study.

by |August 28, 2017
tropical storm harvey forming in the gulf of mexico

Hurricane Harvey: Resources for Journalists

Earth Institute experts are on-hand to answer media questions about hurricane physics, rapid intensification, emergency response, and more.

by |August 24, 2017
Team members taking a short ice core to study properties of sediment coming from the East Antarctic ice sheet. (Photo: Mike Kaplan)

East Antarctic Ice Sheet Should Remain Stable Even if the West Melts

A new look inside the ice sheet validates predictions that it probably won’t melt as quickly as its neighbor—good news, since East Antarctica contains enough water to raise sea levels by 200 feet.

by |August 18, 2017
A tsunami can occur as ocean crust (brown area) dives under continental crust (orange), causing the ocean floor to suddenly moves. In one region off Alaska, researchers have found a large fault and other evidence indicating that the leading edge of the continental  crust has split off, creating an area that can move more efficiently, and thus may be more tsunami-prone. (Anne Becel)

New Images From Under Alaska Seafloor Suggest High Tsunami Danger

Scientists probing under the seafloor off Alaska have mapped a geologic structure that they say signals potential for a major tsunami in an area that normally would be considered benign.

by |July 31, 2017
Due to warming climate, some aircraft may soon have a hard time getting off the ground in the heat of the day. Here, a jet takes off from the Canary Islands. (Bruno Gelger, via flickr)

Surging Heat May Limit Aircraft Takeoffs Globally

Rising temperatures due to global warming will make it harder for many aircraft around the world to take off in coming decades, says a new study. During the hottest parts of the day, 10 to 30 percent of fully loaded planes may have to remove some fuel, cargo or passengers, or else wait for cooler hours to fly.

by |July 13, 2017
Satellite photo of meltwater from Greenland ice sheet. (NASA)

Fueled by Melting Glaciers, Algae Bloom Off Greenland

Iron particles catching a ride on glacial meltwater washed out to sea are likely fueling a recently discovered summer algal bloom off the southern coast of Greenland, according to a new study. Microalgae, also known as phytoplankton, are plant-like marine microorganisms that form the base of the food web in many parts of the ocean…. read more

by |July 5, 2017
Screen Shot 2017-06-27 at 10.19.12 AM

As Climate Stirs Arctic Sea Ice Faster, Pollution Tags Along

A warming climate is not just melting the Arctic’s sea ice; it is stirring the remaining ice faster, increasing the odds that ice-rafted pollution will foul a neighboring country’s waters, says a new study.

by |June 27, 2017
Highlands in Ethiopia. Photo from Flickr.

Malaria Risk Increases in Ethiopian Highlands as Temperatures Climb

The highlands of Ethiopia are home to the majority of the country’s population, the cooler climate serving as a natural buffer against malaria transmission. New data now show that increasing temperatures over the past 35 years are eroding this buffer, allowing conditions more favorable for malaria to begin climbing into highland areas.

by |June 15, 2017
The Amazon River basin as seen by a NASA satellite, showing the impact of surface moisture and rivers on shallow clouds. (NASA)

Vegetation Can Strongly Alter Climate and Weather, Study Finds

A new analysis of global satellite observations shows that vegetation can powerfully alter atmospheric patterns that influence climate and weather.

by |May 30, 2017