Natural Disasters » Page 2

hurricane irma seen from space

Hurricane Irma: Resources for Journalists

As Hurricane Irma batters the Caribbean with winds up to 185 miles per hour, Earth Institute experts are standing by to answer questions from the media.

by |September 6, 2017
harvey

Disaster Recovery and Reconstruction is a National Security Issue

National security is about protecting the safety and way of life of the American people. It is the single most important responsibility of government. We need to get past dysfunction and treat natural and human made disaster response and recovery as a national security issue.

by |September 5, 2017
heat map of globe

How Will Scientists Find Out Whether Climate Change Made Hurricane Harvey Worse? [Video]

It’s too soon to say there’s a connection, but searching for the fingerprints of climate change shouldn’t take too long.

by |September 1, 2017
Hurricane Harvey, as seen from space

Earth Institute Experts Break Down the Causes and Impacts of Hurricane Harvey

As Texas reels in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, our scientists are helping to make sense of how this storm became so destructive, and what’s needed for recovery.

by |August 30, 2017
soldiers move through flooded street

Recovery from Hurricane Harvey Could Take 15 Years

The director of Columbia’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness weighs in on the heartbreaking devastation in Texas.

by |August 29, 2017
heat map of hurricane harvey

How did Hurricane Harvey Become so Powerful, so Quickly?

Over the past day and a half, Hurricane Harvey’s winds have quickened from about 35 to 109 miles per hour. What’s driving this massive power-up?

by |August 25, 2017
tropical storm harvey forming in the gulf of mexico

Hurricane Harvey: Resources for Journalists

Earth Institute experts are on-hand to answer media questions about hurricane physics, rapid intensification, emergency response, and more.

by |August 24, 2017
shelter

How Will Climate Change Impact Shelter?

In this video, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory researchers Robin Bell, Radley Horton, and Adam Sobel explain their research and how it can help improve adaptation practices and make our homes, livelihoods, and the systems we rely on more resilient to extreme weather and sea level rise.

by |August 14, 2017
Dhaka, Bangladesh / Photo: Flickr mariusz kluzniak.

Defining and Predicting Heat Waves in Bangladesh

New research shows that in Bangladesh, heat wave predictability exists from a few days to several weeks in advance, which could save thousands of lives.

by |August 7, 2017
A tsunami can occur as ocean crust (brown area) dives under continental crust (orange), causing the ocean floor to suddenly moves. In one region off Alaska, researchers have found a large fault and other evidence indicating that the leading edge of the continental  crust has split off, creating an area that can move more efficiently, and thus may be more tsunami-prone. (Anne Becel)

New Images From Under Alaska Seafloor Suggest High Tsunami Danger

Scientists probing under the seafloor off Alaska have mapped a geologic structure that they say signals potential for a major tsunami in an area that normally would be considered benign.

by |July 31, 2017