Category: Natural Disasters

NYC, Gulf Coast Teens Talk About Life After Disaster

by | 10.31.2014 at 12:28pm
Hurricane Katrina

At the two-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy, high school students in New York City posed questions about life during and after a catastrophe to a very particular group of experts – high school students in the Gulf Coast who had experienced the BP oil spill and had lived through as many as six hurricanes in the past decade, including Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Their video project, “The Katrina/Sandy Youth Dialogue, Part 1,” is a product of the SHOREline network.

Eye on the Storm

by | 10.14.2014 at 10:47am
adam sobel ocean breeze

Atmospheric scientist Adam Sobel is author of the new book “Storm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future.” Sobel was one of the first researchers to explain to media and the public what might be brewing, before the storm hit. In the aftermath, he looked closely at the factors driving the storm’s unusual ferocity, and how these played against human weaknesses. The book offers a primer on what drives storm systems, and what we know (and don’t) about their relation to warming climate. Sobel also looks into future weather, urban infrastructure and the politics of global climate change. He recently discussed some of his insights.

What Do Wildfires Have to Do with Climate Change?

by | 10.13.2014 at 1:11pm
Deerfire_

“Climate change has been making the fire season in the United States longer and on average more intense,” said John Holdren, President Obama’s science advisor. And, wildfires are not only intensified by climate change, they also exacerbate it.

The Art and Science of Climate Change

by | 9.30.2014 at 3:34pm
Sebastião Salgado, Iceberg between Paulet Island and the South Shetland Islands on the Antarctic Channel. At sea level, earlier flotation levels are clearly visible where the ice has been polished by the ocean’s constant movement. High above, a shape resembling a castle tower has been carved by wind erosion and detached pieces of ice. The Antarctic Peninsula, 2005. © Sebastião Salgado/Amazonas images—Contact Press Images.

This fall, the photographs of Sebastião Salgado provide the springboard for an ambitious program of panel discussions, lectures and film screenings addressing the urgent issue of climate change, at the International Center of Photography in New York City.

Photo Essay: Open House at Lamont-Doherty

by | 9.17.2014 at 12:55pm | 1 Comment
globes 960

Bend a rock. Channel your historic ‘birthquake.’ Check out rocks, fossils, sediment cores and more at Lamont’s Open House on Saturday, October 11.

What Everyone Should Know About Climate Change

by | 9.17.2014 at 11:34am
Kroeker_Kristy UC Davis

Climate scientist William D’Andrea of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory asked young scientists attending a symposium last October, “What do you wish everyone knew about climate change?” He turned the responses into this video, which covers the topic pretty well.

Is the Highest Climb Sustainable, and Who Pays the Price?

by | 9.16.2014 at 1:52pm
Khumbu Icefall, Everest, Photo: Mahatma4711

The Khumbu Icefall on Mount Everest is perhaps the most well-known and notoriously dangerous glacial feature on the planet. In a fresh post on the Glacier Hub blog, the Earth Institute’s Ben Orlove, writing with anthropologist Pasang Yangjee Sherpa of Penn State, recounts a recent workshop held in Kathmandu to address the issues raised by the tragic deaths last spring of 16 Nepalese guides who were preparing the trail for this year’s climbing expeditions.

Practicum Introduces Students to Earth Institute Research

by | 8.27.2014 at 3:59pm
Traffic jams like this one in Monrovia, Liberia, are one challenge for sustainable urban development, one of the topics of the Earth Institute Practicum series this fall. Photo: UN/Christopher Herwig

Each fall, the Earth Institute Practicum offers a broad survey of the applications of frontier research to the practice of sustainable development, taught by top faculty and researchers. The practicum meets weekly on Tuesdays.

Beneath an Icelandic Glacier, Another Eruption Brewing

by | 8.19.2014 at 3:14pm
An eruption pierces the glaciers at the Bárðarbunga volcano. Photo: Oddur Sigurdsson, Iceland Geological Survey

The 2,000-meter tall Bárðarbunga volcano in Iceland is at risk of eruption, an event that could send a cloud of ash and steam high into the atmosphere and cause extensive disruptions in air travel, among other effects, according to media reports. Earth Institute scientist Ben Orlove looks into it on the Glacier Hub blog.

Seismic Stomp

by | 8.12.2014 at 9:27am
The Livingstone Mountains and Lake Malawi (Nyasa)

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory graduate student Natalie Accardo recently returned from Tanzania and Malawi, where she installed seismic instruments in both countries alongside Lamont seismologists Donna Shillington and Jim Gaherty. Natalie produced this video, which shows the scientists and their Tanzanian colleagues conducting a “stomp test” at one of their sites in the Tanzanian village of Manda.