Category: Natural Disasters

Photo Essay: Open House at Lamont-Doherty

by | 9.17.2014 at 12:55pm | 1 Comment
globes 960

Bend a rock. Channel your historic ‘birthquake.’ Check out rocks, fossils, sediment cores and more at Lamont’s Open House on Saturday, October 11.

What Everyone Should Know About Climate Change

by | 9.17.2014 at 11:34am
Kroeker_Kristy UC Davis

Climate scientist William D’Andrea of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory asked young scientists attending a symposium last October, “What do you wish everyone knew about climate change?” He turned the responses into this video, which covers the topic pretty well.

Is the Highest Climb Sustainable, and Who Pays the Price?

by | 9.16.2014 at 1:52pm
Khumbu Icefall, Everest, Photo: Mahatma4711

The Khumbu Icefall on Mount Everest is perhaps the most well-known and notoriously dangerous glacial feature on the planet. In a fresh post on the Glacier Hub blog, the Earth Institute’s Ben Orlove, writing with anthropologist Pasang Yangjee Sherpa of Penn State, recounts a recent workshop held in Kathmandu to address the issues raised by the tragic deaths last spring of 16 Nepalese guides who were preparing the trail for this year’s climbing expeditions.

Practicum Introduces Students to Earth Institute Research

by | 8.27.2014 at 3:59pm
Traffic jams like this one in Monrovia, Liberia, are one challenge for sustainable urban development, one of the topics of the Earth Institute Practicum series this fall. Photo: UN/Christopher Herwig

Each fall, the Earth Institute Practicum offers a broad survey of the applications of frontier research to the practice of sustainable development, taught by top faculty and researchers. The practicum meets weekly on Tuesdays.

Beneath an Icelandic Glacier, Another Eruption Brewing

by | 8.19.2014 at 3:14pm
An eruption pierces the glaciers at the Bárðarbunga volcano. Photo: Oddur Sigurdsson, Iceland Geological Survey

The 2,000-meter tall Bárðarbunga volcano in Iceland is at risk of eruption, an event that could send a cloud of ash and steam high into the atmosphere and cause extensive disruptions in air travel, among other effects, according to media reports. Earth Institute scientist Ben Orlove looks into it on the Glacier Hub blog.

Seismic Stomp

by | 8.12.2014 at 9:27am
The Livingstone Mountains and Lake Malawi (Nyasa)

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory graduate student Natalie Accardo recently returned from Tanzania and Malawi, where she installed seismic instruments in both countries alongside Lamont seismologists Donna Shillington and Jim Gaherty. Natalie produced this video, which shows the scientists and their Tanzanian colleagues conducting a “stomp test” at one of their sites in the Tanzanian village of Manda.

Our Fiscal Year Ends June 30: Donate Now to Help Us Finish Strong!

by | 6.26.2014 at 4:47pm
Donate Now

The end of our fiscal year is just one week away and we need your support more than ever. This year, the generosity of Earth Institute supporters allowed our award-winning scientists and researchers to pursue groundbreaking initiatives in the fields of earth and environmental sciences, ecology, engineering and architecture, law, medicine and public health, economics, political science, public policy, ethics and management, and more to advance global sustainable development.

Fund Pledges $2.5 Million for Disaster Preparedness Center

by | 6.13.2014 at 2:26pm
Moore, Okla., May 29, 2013 -- Moore residents visit their tornado destroyed property as volunteers clean up the debris. The Moore area was struck by a F5 tornado on May 20, 2013. Andrea Booher/FEMA

The National Center for Disaster Preparedness at the Earth Institute maintains a strong working partnership with the Children’s Health Fund, a national organization that supports pediatric care for underserved children. Over the past decade, the center has engaged in a number of projects funded by the fund, which recently announced its renewed support with a $2.5 million pledge.

Project Aims to Strengthen Climate Resilience

by | 5.29.2014 at 4:34pm
seasonal precip forecast IRI carib 2014

The Caribbean, Asia’s Indo-Gangetic Plain and West Africa are three regions known to be extremely vulnerable to climate variability and change, particularly to droughts, extreme weather events and stresses on food production, water resources and coastal areas. A new five-year project jointly led by the International Research Institute for Climate and Society and the University of Arizona aims to strengthen climate resilience in these regions using strategies in the sectors of water resources, hazard risk management and coastal planning and management.

IPCC Says Managing Risks of Climate Change is Critical

by | 4.2.2014 at 1:52pm
floodedstreet--lahore-pakistan-fi

Among the key findings of the WGII AR5 Report chapter on human security, a topic highlighted in the Report for the first time, is that societies in conflict are more vulnerable to climate change.