Health

The Potomac River in West Virginia in autumn

Can State Environmental Agencies Fill in for a Failing EPA?

There are places where EPA will fail the American people. But while state and local governments cannot perform all the functions that a national environmental agency can, visible local environmental and health impacts will lead mayors and governors to act.

by |April 10, 2017

Sustainable Development Fall 2016 Workshop Briefings

By Chandler Precht On December 9, 2016, students in the Undergraduate Program in Sustainable Development presented practical solutions to sustainability issues and challenges faced by real world clients. Under the guidance of Professor Stuart Gaffin and Professor Radley Horton, the Capstone Workshop offers students a chance to convey the knowledge and theories gained throughout their time in the… read more

by |December 10, 2016
The recent bombing in New York's Chelsea neighborhood brought home again the random nature of the threat from terror attacks.

The New State of Terrorism: How to Prepare

Here are some other things you should know to help cope with a local terror event caused by a “lone wolf” attacker or active shooter situation, from the National Center for Disaster Preparedness.

by |October 4, 2016
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The World Trade Center Disaster And Our Toxic World

In a dangerous world we must be vigilant in the face of evil, but we must also do our best to reduce self-inflicted wounds. We can do a better job of detoxifying our technology, and of helping those who are victims of attacks and disasters. We owe it to our children and the planet they will inherit.

by |September 12, 2016
Scientists test the water at Lake Tear of the Clouds, high in the Adirondacks of New York. Their testing at the source of the mighty Hudson River in August 2016 was part of a full-river health check from its headwaters to the ocean. Photo: Andy Juhl/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

How Safe is the Hudson? Scientists Test the River, Adirondacks to Ocean

A team of scientists conducted an unprecedented health check of the entire Hudson River system, from its source to New York Harbor. This is what they found.

by |August 31, 2016
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Changing Environmental Values and a Changing World

I believe that concern over tap water is part of the growing movement for locally-sourced food, physical fitness, and what has been termed “wellness.” The underlying source of support for environmental protection is a growing understanding of the relationship between a toxic environment and human health.

by |July 18, 2016
Looking across the Ed Koch (Queensborough) Bridge, June 6, 2011. Photo: Chris Goldberg / Creative Commons

Study Warns of Surge in Heat-Related Deaths in New York City

A new study projects that as many as 3,331 people a year could be dying from the heat during New York City summers by 2080 as a result of the warming climate. That compares to 638 heat-related deaths on average between 2000 and 2006.

by |June 29, 2016
arsenic video snip

Get the Facts: Arsenic in New Jersey Well Water

A new initiative aims to help homeowners in New Jersey cope with arsenic contamination in private wells—a problem that has only come to light in recent years, and about which many homeowners are still unaware.

by |June 16, 2016

By the Numbers: Air Quality and Pollution in New York City

New York City is known for many things, but having clean air isn’t one of them. Explore some of the issues and challenges the Big Apple faces in clearing NYC’s air through interactive maps and data.

Dog ticks (left) and black legged or deer ticks (right). The latter spread Lyme disease in the eastern United States. Climate variability can influence the spread of Lyme and other vector-borne diseases. Photo: Jim Occi

The Connection Between Climate and Public Health

International Research Institute for Climate and Society and the Mailman School of Public Health will hold a two-day meeting to talk about how climate influences issues of public health, from heat waves to infectious diseases. The event will be livestreamed, and you also can follow it on Twitter at #healthclimate2016.

by |June 1, 2016