Health

Research summary, March 2017. Photo: Maria Gonzalez Millan

Internet-in-a-Box: Connectivity for the Rest of the World

For the 60% of people without Internet access across the globe, lack of connectivity can affect every facet of their lives – including healthcare. In the Dominican Republic, a team of MPA-DP students examines how Internet-in-a-box technology could help healthcare providers improve outcomes in the developing world.

by |June 13, 2017
Screenshots of Bitebytes beta version. This heat map does not reflect actual mosquito prevalence.

Track Mosquitoes with your Smartphone

Using crowd-sourced data, the Bitebytes app can educate the public on mosquitoes, the diseases they transmit, and mosquito habitat control, while allowing cities to target key areas to help control the potential for the spread of mosquito-borne diseases.

by |June 6, 2017
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A Small Senate Victory Maintains Methane Regulation

While I see little hope of modernizing the environmental regulatory structure under the current regime, last week provided some hope that the U.S. Senate won’t allow our environmental laws to be dismantled.

by |May 15, 2017
The Potomac River in West Virginia in autumn

Can State Environmental Agencies Fill in for a Failing EPA?

There are places where EPA will fail the American people. But while state and local governments cannot perform all the functions that a national environmental agency can, visible local environmental and health impacts will lead mayors and governors to act.

by |April 10, 2017

Sustainable Development Fall 2016 Workshop Briefings

By Chandler Precht On December 9, 2016, students in the Undergraduate Program in Sustainable Development presented practical solutions to sustainability issues and challenges faced by real world clients. Under the guidance of Professor Stuart Gaffin and Professor Radley Horton, the Capstone Workshop offers students a chance to convey the knowledge and theories gained throughout their time in the… read more

by |December 10, 2016
The recent bombing in New York's Chelsea neighborhood brought home again the random nature of the threat from terror attacks.

The New State of Terrorism: How to Prepare

Here are some other things you should know to help cope with a local terror event caused by a “lone wolf” attacker or active shooter situation, from the National Center for Disaster Preparedness.

by |October 4, 2016
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The World Trade Center Disaster And Our Toxic World

In a dangerous world we must be vigilant in the face of evil, but we must also do our best to reduce self-inflicted wounds. We can do a better job of detoxifying our technology, and of helping those who are victims of attacks and disasters. We owe it to our children and the planet they will inherit.

by |September 12, 2016
Scientists test the water at Lake Tear of the Clouds, high in the Adirondacks of New York. Their testing at the source of the mighty Hudson River in August 2016 was part of a full-river health check from its headwaters to the ocean. Photo: Andy Juhl/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

How Safe is the Hudson? Scientists Test the River, Adirondacks to Ocean

A team of scientists conducted an unprecedented health check of the entire Hudson River system, from its source to New York Harbor. This is what they found.

by |August 31, 2016
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Changing Environmental Values and a Changing World

I believe that concern over tap water is part of the growing movement for locally-sourced food, physical fitness, and what has been termed “wellness.” The underlying source of support for environmental protection is a growing understanding of the relationship between a toxic environment and human health.

by |July 18, 2016
Looking across the Ed Koch (Queensborough) Bridge, June 6, 2011. Photo: Chris Goldberg / Creative Commons

Study Warns of Surge in Heat-Related Deaths in New York City

A new study projects that as many as 3,331 people a year could be dying from the heat during New York City summers by 2080 as a result of the warming climate. That compares to 638 heat-related deaths on average between 2000 and 2006.

by |June 29, 2016