Category: General Earth Institute

Copy Cat!: Fighting the Global Water Scarcity Issue

by | 10.29.2014 at 1:50pm
A_child_drinks_water

According to the World Water Management Institute, over one-third of the human population is affected by water scarcity. Advances in physical understanding, its applications, and the study of our environment and bio-mimicry help us develop more effective ways to fight freshwater scarcity around the world.

Faculty Profile: Sara Tjossem

by | 10.27.2014 at 1:43pm
tjossem

For Sara Tjossem, a Senior Lecturer at the School of International and Public Affairs, the MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program is an exciting opportunity for her to engage with tomorrow’s environmental leaders. Tjossem says one of her favorite parts of the program is watching students form professional and personal connections they may not have otherwise made.

Alma Mater’s Other Secret: a Way Forward on Climate

by | 10.27.2014 at 12:00pm
keleman oman rock closeup KK

Sitting on the iconic front steps of Low Library, Alma Mater opens her arms to all who would learn. The plinth on which she rests sends a different message — clues to one possible method of carbon sequestration, which could prove to be a vital technology for addressing our problem of too much CO2.

An Evening with the Writers of the Clean Air Act: Insight into the ‘Golden Age’ of Environmental Law

by | 10.24.2014 at 9:44am
Leon Billings, Edmund Muskie, and Thomas Jorling circa 1970.

At a panel discussion this week, Leon Billings and Thomas Jorling, two senior staff members who helped craft the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and other major environmental legislation in the 1970s, spoke about the bipartisan effort to pass that legislation, and the partisan divide that stymies Congress today.

The Ebola Crisis: What It Means for West Africa and the World

by | 10.23.2014 at 12:40pm
A patient attempts to rehydrate himself under the watchful eye of a nurse. Photo: Sylvain Cherkaoui/Cosmos for Médecins Sans Frontières

“The Ebola epidemic … should be viewed akin to a world war whose outcome matters crucially for all of us,” said Dr. Ranu Dhillon; he and other health experts will speak at a forum on Ebola at Columbia University Monday.

Photo Essay: A Day in the Life of the Hudson River

by | 10.23.2014 at 12:37pm
Wading into the Hudson, the students collect, identify and count species of fish. Here, Pearl River High School teacher Tom Mullane holds up a juvenile herring. (Margie Turrin)

Once a year, Piermont Pier becomes a field station, and local students, a team of environmental investigators. On Tuesday, scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory led students through a series of field experiments designed to teach them more about the Hudson River.

MS Student Advocates for Sustainable Fashion

by | 10.23.2014 at 10:20am
MS in Sustainability Management student Ruth Penniston

After working in the University of Arizona’s Laboratory of Tree Ring Research, current Master of Science in Sustainability Management student Ruth Penniston joined the program with the intention of helping to bridge the gap between scientists and the rest of the world. Recently, Ruth began an internship at a sustainable fashion company, Modavanti, where she communicates her passion for the environment through advocating for sustainable fashion choices to the consumers. She strongly believes individuals should be given options for a more sustainable lifestyle and be educated about the benefits these options entail.

Eco-Theater Engages Visitors at Lamont-Doherty’s Open House

by | 10.22.2014 at 3:32pm
Superhero Clubhouse Performs "Salty Folk"
Photo Credit: Jane Rebecca Marchant

Visitors to Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory’s open house on Oct. 11 could tune in to a performance of “Salty Folk” by Superhero Clubhouse, a collective of artists and environmental advocates. Created by Jeremy Pickard and Nate Weida, the play uses music and humor to illustrate the history and importance of New York Harbor through the “eyes” of five oysters: Brook, Manny, Bronxy, Queeny and Stats.

Administrative Internship in the Executive Director’s Office

by | 10.22.2014 at 10:21am
Butler

The Office of the Executive Director at the Earth Institute is seeking an intern to provide administrative support during the work week. Intern tasks include administrative work such as correspondence, scheduling, phone and desk coverage, photocopying, mailings, and errands. The intern may also be asked to provide research support to the team, including compiling and editing reports and presentations, as well as support in planning and executing Executive Director’s events, meetings, conferences, and seminars.

Volcanic Plumbing at Mid-Ocean Ridges Goes Far Deeper than Thought

by | 10.21.2014 at 12:01pm
The images were taken aboard the R/V Langseth on a 2008 expedition to the East Pacific Rise. (Marjanovic)

New pictures in the journal Nature Geoscience may help resolve a debate about how new crust forms at mid-ocean ridges where earth’s tectonic plates are slowly pulling apart.