Category: Ecosystems

Studies Find Climate Change to Disrupt Antarctic and Tropical Ecosystems

by | 8.14.2014 at 3:17pm
Krill shortages will impact Adélie penguins’ foraging and reproductive abilities.

A recent study finds that West Antarctica’s ecosystem is highly correlated to its climate. As a result, climate change will have a negative impact on its ecological relationships, from plankton to penguins. Antarctica isn’t alone – climate change will also affect tropical ocean ecosystems by causing mass coral bleaching.

Deep Sea Plough

by | 8.1.2014 at 10:00am
Photo: 2011room5mgk.wikispaces.com

Giant fleets the oceans trawl,
Gasping fish they skywards haul.
Not just critters do they move,
But sediments they push and groove …

Investigating Water Quality and Arsenic in Bangladesh

by | 7.30.2014 at 12:22pm
Joining PVC pipes during well installation

Postcard from the Field: Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory graduate student Rajib Mozumder, who works with Lamont scientists Lex van Geen and Ben Bostick, has spent part of his summer drilling water wells and collecting samples in Bangladesh.

Exploring Ecology and History in Bermuda

by | 7.30.2014 at 10:26am
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I learned about the coral reef ecology course in Bermuda offered through the Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability (EICES) at Columbia University after developing an interest in marine science over the past year. My background is in newspaper journalism, but I’m now a communications professional at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), devoted to promoting the great work of our scientists around the globe, including those in marine conservation. My supervisors and peers encouraged me to seize the opportunity to take the class since continuing education is something that’s valued at WCS.

Our Fiscal Year Ends June 30: Donate Now to Help Us Finish Strong!

by | 6.26.2014 at 4:47pm
Donate Now

The end of our fiscal year is just one week away and we need your support more than ever. This year, the generosity of Earth Institute supporters allowed our award-winning scientists and researchers to pursue groundbreaking initiatives in the fields of earth and environmental sciences, ecology, engineering and architecture, law, medicine and public health, economics, political science, public policy, ethics and management, and more to advance global sustainable development.

Making Progress on Deforestation

by | 6.23.2014 at 8:47pm
The Amazon rainforest. Photo: CIFOR

In 2005, Brazil was losing more forest each year than any other country. Today, Brazil has reduced deforestation in the Amazon by 70 percent. Seventeen countries across four continents have also shown progress in reducing tropical deforestation. But there is still a long way to go.

Fund Pledges $2.5 Million for Disaster Preparedness Center

by | 6.13.2014 at 2:26pm
Moore, Okla., May 29, 2013 -- Moore residents visit their tornado destroyed property as volunteers clean up the debris. The Moore area was struck by a F5 tornado on May 20, 2013. Andrea Booher/FEMA

The National Center for Disaster Preparedness at the Earth Institute maintains a strong working partnership with the Children’s Health Fund, a national organization that supports pediatric care for underserved children. Over the past decade, the center has engaged in a number of projects funded by the fund, which recently announced its renewed support with a $2.5 million pledge.

Some Do Not Like It Hot

by | 5.30.2014 at 2:35pm
early Triassic, Image: Sun et al. 2012, Science

The Great Dying, The Big One — The Permo-Triassic!
(In a time machine, not sure if that’s where I’d aim …)
As extinctions go, this one’s a blockbuster classic,
When most of Earth’s species dropped out of the game.

Climate and the Opal Artisans of the Sea

by | 5.12.2014 at 11:13am
New Picture

Tiny one-celled organisms called radiolaria are ubiquitous in the oceans, but various species prefer distinct habitats. Thus it aroused considerable intrigue in 2012 when protozoa specialist O. Roger Anderson and colleagues published a study showing that radiolaria normally found near the equator were suddenly floating around in arctic waters above Norway. Was this a sign that global climate change was bringing an invasion of warm-weather plankton?

Amid a Fossil Bonanza, Drilling Deep into Pre-Dinosaurian Rocks

by | 4.29.2014 at 1:40pm
1a

On a high ridge in Arizona’s Petrified Forest National Park, paleontologist Paul Olsen sits on the fallen trunk of a 215-million-year-old tree, now turned to stone. The tree once loomed 70 or 80 feet above a riverine landscape teeming with fish, turtles, giant crocodilians and tiny, early species of dinosaurs.