Earth Sciences

Alamo dropped, mission complete! An image of the shadow of the LC130 as it flies across the Ross Ice Shelf.   (Photo by Fabio)

The ‘Bird’ Has Flown!

The ‘bird’ has flown! Voices are raised in celebratory cheers from the southernmost continent to across the U.S. Our first ALAMO float is deployed! Now we can begin to answer some of the big questions on this mysterious ice/ocean interface.

by |December 2, 2016
When frozen land thaws, the loss of ice in the soil creates landscapes that can be easily eroded. “This study suggests that similar processes occurred during past warming events with important implications for the land-to-ocean permafrost carbon fluxes,” says lead author Tommaso Tesi. Illustration: Tesi, et al. 2016

When Permafrost Melts, What Happens to All That Stored Carbon?

A new study documents evidence of a massive release of carbon from Siberian permafrost as temperatures rose at the end of the last ice age.

by |December 2, 2016
The first of six ALAMO floats parachutes into the Ross Sea off Antarctica to begin profiling the water. Their mission is to check for areas where warmer than normal water could put the Ross Ice Shelf at risk. Photo: Tej Dhakal/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Antarctica Has a New Explorer in the Water Near a Key Ice Shelf

The first of six ALAMO floats parachuted into the Ross Sea off Antarctica to begin profiling the water in a check for areas where warmer than normal water could put the Ross Ice Shelf at risk.

by |December 2, 2016
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AGU 2016: Key Events From the Earth Institute

Scientists at Columbia University’s Earth Institute will present important findings at this year’s meeting of the American Geophysical Union, the world’s largest gathering of earth and space scientists.

by |November 29, 2016
Bridgit Boulahanis and Mike Perfit prepare for their dive to the seamount. Photo courtesy of Dan Fornari.

My Trip to the Bottom of the Sea

What’s it like to travel to the bottom of the sea? Lamont graduate student Bridgit Boulahanis describes the bioluminescence and colorful sea life as she explores a seamount by mini submarine in the Pacific Ocean.

by |November 26, 2016
The Liona seamount.

A Front Row Seat on the Ocean Floor

Ocean scientists are, in their hearts, explorers. Our group aboard the R/V Atlantis may be more infected with the exploration bug than most. The first goal of our expedition makes that clear: We aim to map regions of the seafloor never before seen by human eyes.

by |November 15, 2016
open house snip 2016

Lamont Opens Doors to Earth Sciences at Open House

Nearly 3,000 people showed up to explore the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory’s campus and laboratories at the open house on Oct. 8. Watch the video and find out what it was all about.

by |October 19, 2016
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The Coming Great Quakes in India and Bangladesh?

A new film takes viewers from the eastern highlands of India to the booming lowland metropolis of Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh–and explores an ever-more detailed picture of catastrophic earthquake threat that scientists are discovering under the region.

by |October 18, 2016
Grad student Daniel Rasmussen drew a big crowd for the volcano simulations. This one is a concoction of Mentos and Diet Coke.

Getting Hands-On with Science at Lamont: Open House 2016

Thousands of visitors toured the labs and crowded around demonstrations at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory’s Open House on Saturday, often jumping in to help.

by |October 14, 2016
Robin Bell will serve as AGU president-elect for two years, then become AGU president in 2019. Photo: Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Lamont’s Robin Bell Chosen as AGU President-Elect

The American Geophysical Union election results are in, and three Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientists will be taking key leadership roles in the internationally influential Earth and space sciences organization.

by |October 13, 2016