Category: Earth Sciences

Practicum Introduces Students to Earth Institute Research

by | 8.27.2014 at 3:59pm
hurricane

Each fall the Earth Institute offers a broad survey of the applications of frontier research to the practice of sustainable development through contributions from Earth Institute researchers and directors in the Earth Institute Practicum. The practicum provides an opportunity to learn about salient issues in sustainable development, sustainability management and environmental science from world-class faculty and researchers in these areas.

Faint Young Sun

by | 8.22.2014 at 10:31am
Image credit: Science online, J.F. Kasting

Through an ancient looking-glass,
Perhaps you’d see more H2 gas,
And if with denser gas collided,
Greater greenhouse warmth provided.

Reflections of a Changing North

by | 8.22.2014 at 8:48am
The Kullorsuaq waterfront. (Photo M. Turrin)

No one ever leaves the field the same way they entered it. Yes there is a new layer of mud on equipment, the expected wear and tear on your personal gear and your physical being, but that is not what I am referring to. I am acknowledging the intangible shift in perspective from a deepened understanding and a broadened vision that has been provided by the experience, and beyond that the questions that drive the next field campaign.

Beneath an Icelandic Glacier, Another Eruption Brewing

by | 8.19.2014 at 3:14pm
An eruption pierces the glaciers at the Bárðarbunga volcano. Photo: Oddur Sigurdsson, Iceland Geological Survey

The 2,000-meter tall Bárðarbunga volcano in Iceland is at risk of eruption, an event that could send a cloud of ash and steam high into the atmosphere and cause extensive disruptions in air travel, among other effects, according to media reports. Earth Institute scientist Ben Orlove looks into it on the Glacier Hub blog.

Bottom Feeders

by | 8.15.2014 at 10:28am
Microscopic images: Yuki Morono

Graduate students, microbe goo …
What is it that links the two?
It seems that both life forms are found
Where electron donors (food) abound!

Seismic Stomp

by | 8.12.2014 at 9:27am
The Livingstone Mountains and Lake Malawi (Nyasa)

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory graduate student Natalie Accardo recently returned from Tanzania and Malawi, where she installed seismic instruments in both countries alongside Lamont seismologists Donna Shillington and Jim Gaherty. Natalie produced this video, which shows the scientists and their Tanzanian colleagues conducting a “stomp test” at one of their sites in the Tanzanian village of Manda.

The Long Life of Death Valley

by | 8.11.2014 at 11:14am
While Death Valley’s  Mesquite Flat Dunes are popular with tourists, Christie-Blick prefers to take his students to a set of smaller, less-traveled dunes nearby. Here, Meara Hayden (right), Tina Liu and Xin Xu examine variations in sand grain size associated with wind ripples.

Geologist Nicholas Christie-Blick has studied the Death Valley region for more than four decades. Each spring, he leads a group of Columbia University undergraduates there on a fieldtrip. Check out highlights from this year’s trip.

Deep Sea Plough

by | 8.1.2014 at 10:00am
Photo: 2011room5mgk.wikispaces.com

Giant fleets the oceans trawl,
Gasping fish they skywards haul.
Not just critters do they move,
But sediments they push and groove …

Solving the Mysteries of Carbon Dioxide

by | 7.30.2014 at 8:38pm
OCO-2. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech

About 50 percent of the CO2 produced by human activity remains in the atmosphere, warming the planet. But scientists don’t know where and how oceans and plants have absorbed the rest of the manmade CO2. To try to answer these questions, on July 2, 2014, NASA launched the $468 million Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), its first Earth remote sensing satellite dedicated to studying atmospheric carbon dioxide from space.

Investigating Water Quality and Arsenic in Bangladesh

by | 7.30.2014 at 12:22pm
Joining PVC pipes during well installation

Postcard from the Field: Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory graduate student Rajib Mozumder, who works with Lamont scientists Lex van Geen and Ben Bostick, has spent part of his summer drilling water wells and collecting samples in Bangladesh.