Category: Earth Sciences

View From an Iceberg

by | 7.21.2014 at 12:13pm
WeShouldGoHere_sm

The science goal for today is to complete 8 CTD casts. We load into our vessel, a Poca 500GR. We have discussed a 6 to 8 hour window of boat time with Gabriel the captain and Magnus our navigator and stocked up on 40 liters of benzene.

A meeting for the Kullorsuaq Community

by | 7.19.2014 at 8:58pm
Iceberg_sm

It seems that many of the local fishermen have gone to hunt Narwal further north but there are several good prospects for boats that Søren will scout further as several of the fishermen are sleeping as the fishing is better right now at night. With 24 hours of daylight day or night fishing doesn’t really seem to matter.

‘Thumbs Up’ for Travel to Kullorsuaq

by | 7.17.2014 at 5:46pm
Landing at the Kullorsuaq ‘helipad’. The helipad is surrounded by canisters of gasoline used to refuel for the return leg. The local transport of luggage and gear is a front loader that delivers the gear to your door. (Photo M. Turrin)

At the small airport a smiling woman approaches us asking our plans in one word “Kullorsuaq?” We smile and nod and she grins broadly motioning that she and her daughter are going there too – it is their home she manages to convey.

The Son of a Hunter

by | 7.14.2014 at 10:36pm
Greenland seal carving (Photo M. Turrin)

A visit to the Upernavik museum brought us to ‘Edvard’ a young Greenlandic and the local museum curator. Embracing the opportunity to practice his English he enthusiastically spent time sharing the historic art and past of the community and his experiences as a young adult growing up in a Greenland that is shifting from one set of cultural norms to another.

What Geology Has to Say About Global Warming

by | 7.11.2014 at 3:00pm
Cobscook Bay State Park, Maine. Photo: W. Menke

The most important lessons drawn from geology are that the earth’s climate can change radically and that the pace of change can be rapid. The precision of measurement is currently too poor to give an exact answer to a critical question, At what carbon dioxide level are we in danger of melting Antarctica? However, while crude, these estimates suggest that this threshold will be reached in 150-300 years, if carbon dioxide levels continue to rise at the current rate.

Iron Fingerprints

by | 7.11.2014 at 1:20am
Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC (reposted from Nature.com)

  Metals galore in deep Earth, But at the sea surface, a dearth. Iron is key For greening the sea … To planktic cells, gold has less worth.

Glacier Marks on Mount Chirripó

by | 7.9.2014 at 4:39pm
Max 7.2

On his sixth day on Mount Chirripo, Lamont’s Max Cunningham finds clues of the mountain’s origins and evolution.

Back to Mount Chirripó

by | 7.8.2014 at 12:14pm
Max 6.5

On their fifth day of fieldwork on Mount Chirripo, Lamont’s Max Cunningham and Mike Kaplan encounter some deeply weathered boulders.

Our Fiscal Year Ends June 30: Donate Now to Help Us Finish Strong!

by | 6.26.2014 at 4:47pm
Donate Now

The end of our fiscal year is just one week away and we need your support more than ever. This year, the generosity of Earth Institute supporters allowed our award-winning scientists and researchers to pursue groundbreaking initiatives in the fields of earth and environmental sciences, ecology, engineering and architecture, law, medicine and public health, economics, political science, public policy, ethics and management, and more to advance global sustainable development.

A Quick Retreat from ‘Mountain Lion’ Savannah

by | 6.17.2014 at 12:03pm
Max 5.3

On their fourth day on Mount Chirripo, Lamont’s Max Cunningham and Mike Kaplan explore an unusual valley and find the spot where a lion apparently killed someone.