Category: Earth Sciences

Agreement with NY State Protects Black Rock Forest

by | 10.30.2014 at 12:00pm
Black Rock Forest

New York State will acquire a conservation easement for the Black Rock Forest, protecting the 3,800-acre preserve 50 miles north of New York City for both public use and scientific research.

Alma Mater’s Other Secret: a Way Forward on Climate

by | 10.27.2014 at 12:00pm
keleman oman rock closeup KK

Sitting on the iconic front steps of Low Library, Alma Mater opens her arms to all who would learn. The plinth on which she rests sends a different message — clues to one possible method of carbon sequestration, which could prove to be a vital technology for addressing our problem of too much CO2.

Photo Essay: A Day in the Life of the Hudson River

by | 10.23.2014 at 12:37pm
Wading into the Hudson, the students collect, identify and count species of fish. Here, Pearl River High School teacher Tom Mullane holds up a juvenile herring. (Margie Turrin)

Once a year, Piermont Pier becomes a field station, and local students, a team of environmental investigators. On Tuesday, scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory led students through a series of field experiments designed to teach them more about the Hudson River.

Eco-Theater Engages Visitors at Lamont-Doherty’s Open House

by | 10.22.2014 at 3:32pm
Superhero Clubhouse Performs "Salty Folk"
Photo Credit: Jane Rebecca Marchant

Visitors to Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory’s open house on Oct. 11 could tune in to a performance of “Salty Folk” by Superhero Clubhouse, a collective of artists and environmental advocates. Created by Jeremy Pickard and Nate Weida, the play uses music and humor to illustrate the history and importance of New York Harbor through the “eyes” of five oysters: Brook, Manny, Bronxy, Queeny and Stats.

Volcanic Plumbing at Mid-Ocean Ridges Goes Far Deeper than Thought

by | 10.21.2014 at 12:01pm
The images were taken aboard the R/V Langseth on a 2008 expedition to the East Pacific Rise. (Marjanovic)

New pictures in the journal Nature Geoscience may help resolve a debate about how new crust forms at mid-ocean ridges where earth’s tectonic plates are slowly pulling apart.

Watch Your Step: the Alpha Predator of the Ordovician

by | 10.20.2014 at 12:00pm
Squid-like cephalopods ruled the oceans in the Ordovician. Image: University of Michigan Museum of Natural History

Frozen into the stone floor of a stairway landing, several flights up in Columbia’s Lewisohn Hall, sits a stark reminder of how life has evolved in the sea. Part 6 of the Columbia Geology Tour.

Sun-gazing

by | 10.17.2014 at 11:00am
Dopplergrams from the NASA's space telescope IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph) revealing detailed evidence of "twist" between the sun's surface and outer atmosphere. These phenomena may play a role in driving the temperature difference between the sun's surface (~6000 K) and the sun's outer atmosphere (millions of degrees). The reason for this enormous temperature gradient is not fully understood (a puzzle known as the "coronal heating problem"). Image: De Pontieu et al., Science 2014

By Galileo’s careful hand, sunspot details are exquisite,
Through eye of forehead, eye of mind beholds what body can not visit.
If only he could see the sights now rendered from Earth’s outer space,
Ultraviolet sunscapes – Oh, to see his raptured face!

What Do Wildfires Have to Do with Climate Change?

by | 10.13.2014 at 1:11pm
Deerfire_

“Climate change has been making the fire season in the United States longer and on average more intense,” said John Holdren, President Obama’s science advisor. And, wildfires are not only intensified by climate change, they also exacerbate it.

Orogenous Zones: How Rock Flows

by | 10.13.2014 at 11:00am
Zagros mountains folded_mountain CC

The architects of Columbia’s modern Northwest Tower, at the corner of Broadway and 120th Street, made good use of some beautiful stones. In their polished and swirling surfaces, they tell a story of the clash of continents and the processes by which mountains are made.

Chemical silence

by | 10.10.2014 at 9:26am
Photo: Elkhorn coral colony near Akumal, Mexico. John Bruno (Science).

What if you couldn’t smell smoke?
Or detect flirty signs from a bloke?
Imagine the cost
Of faculties lost,
Of signals that deafness would cloak …