Earth Sciences

ocean currents near antarctica

‘Pangeo’ Project Will Improve Access to Climate Data

The better climate models become, the harder it is to use them. One team of researchers is working to fix that.

by |September 13, 2017
Team members taking a short ice core to study properties of sediment coming from the East Antarctic ice sheet. (Photo: Mike Kaplan)

East Antarctic Ice Sheet Should Remain Stable Even if the West Melts

A new look inside the ice sheet validates predictions that it probably won’t melt as quickly as its neighbor—good news, since East Antarctica contains enough water to raise sea levels by 200 feet.

by |August 18, 2017
ross ice shelf

Antarctic Ice-Mapping Project Will Fly for the Last Time in October

With its mission complete, the Rosetta-Ice Project will give scientists an unprecedented look at the Ross Ice Shelf and how it’s changing with the climate.

by |August 18, 2017
shelter

How Will Climate Change Impact Shelter?

In this video, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory researchers Robin Bell, Radley Horton, and Adam Sobel explain their research and how it can help improve adaptation practices and make our homes, livelihoods, and the systems we rely on more resilient to extreme weather and sea level rise.

by |August 14, 2017
frozen-nyc-anthony-quintano-cc-by-20-690x454

Analyzing Winter Storm Risk and Resilience in a Changing Climate

A new study analyzing storm intensity and impacts in the New York metro area aims to inform how communities can better prepare for winter storms and enhance resiliency as the effects of climate change exacerbate hazards.

by |August 8, 2017
A tsunami can occur as ocean crust (brown area) dives under continental crust (orange), causing the ocean floor to suddenly moves. In one region off Alaska, researchers have found a large fault and other evidence indicating that the leading edge of the continental  crust has split off, creating an area that can move more efficiently, and thus may be more tsunami-prone. (Anne Becel)

New Images From Under Alaska Seafloor Suggest High Tsunami Danger

Scientists probing under the seafloor off Alaska have mapped a geologic structure that they say signals potential for a major tsunami in an area that normally would be considered benign.

by |July 31, 2017
Energy Video image

Developing Carbon Management Solutions

David Goldberg and Peter Kelemen, scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, are at the forefront of carbon capture and storage research. In this video, they discuss their work and how it will contribute to carbon management solutions and strengthen society’s resilience to climate change.

by |July 19, 2017
Gwenn Hennon demonstrates experiment aboard the RV Kilo Moana

Eavesdropping on the Ocean’s Mighty Microorganisms

Now, nearing the end of our three-week cruise of the North Pacific off Hawaii, we are working to understand how these tiny bacteria connect and communicate with one another.

by |July 13, 2017
Due to warming climate, some aircraft may soon have a hard time getting off the ground in the heat of the day. Here, a jet takes off from the Canary Islands. (Bruno Gelger, via flickr)

Surging Heat May Limit Aircraft Takeoffs Globally

Rising temperatures due to global warming will make it harder for many aircraft around the world to take off in coming decades, says a new study. During the hottest parts of the day, 10 to 30 percent of fully loaded planes may have to remove some fuel, cargo or passengers, or else wait for cooler hours to fly.

by |July 13, 2017
Tara Clemente, Rob Palomares, Time Burrell, Ryan Tabata and Paul Den Uyl pulling samples from the depths of the North Pacific

Deep thoughts from the Deep Blue Sea

The sea is a deep blue, so clear that you might think it was devoid of life. We have seen only a few seabirds circling the ship and playing in the air currents we generate. We haven’t seen any whales or sharks, only an occasional flying fish taking to the air in front of our bow wake. In this apparent desert, microbial life is king.

by |July 6, 2017