Category: Climate

Floods, Companies and Supply Chain Risk

by | 11.17.2014 at 9:15am
Thailand_floods_Nov_2011_small

Global companies with long supply chains could do a much better job of managing climate disaster risk, according to a recently published study from Masahikio Haraguchi and Upmanu Lall, researchers at the Columbia Water Center. According to the study, published in the International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, even as the impact of natural hazards [...]

Study: NASA Sites Vulnerable to Climate Change

by | 11.3.2014 at 6:49pm
Kennedy Space Center. Photo: NASA

NASA has been at the forefront of climate science, launching satellites that take the pulse of Earth’s land, oceans and atmospheric systems. But the agency is increasingly vulnerable itself to the effects of a changing climate.

Alma Mater’s Other Secret: a Way Forward on Climate

by | 10.27.2014 at 12:00pm
keleman oman rock closeup KK

Sitting on the iconic front steps of Low Library, Alma Mater rests on a plinth that offers a clue to a possible method of carbon sequestration, a vital technology for addressing our problem of too much CO2.

An Evening with the Writers of the Clean Air Act: Insight into the ‘Golden Age’ of Environmental Law

by | 10.24.2014 at 9:44am
Leon Billings, Edmund Muskie, and Thomas Jorling circa 1970.

At a panel discussion this week, Leon Billings and Thomas Jorling, two senior staff members who helped craft the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and other major environmental legislation in the 1970s, spoke about the bipartisan effort to pass that legislation, and the partisan divide that stymies Congress today.

Photo Essay: A Day in the Life of the Hudson River

by | 10.23.2014 at 12:37pm
Wading into the Hudson, the students collect, identify and count species of fish. Here, Pearl River High School teacher Tom Mullane holds up a juvenile herring. (Margie Turrin)

Once a year, Piermont Pier becomes a field station, and local students, a team of environmental investigators. On Tuesday, scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory led students through a series of field experiments designed to teach them more about the Hudson River.

Eco-Theater Engages Visitors at Lamont-Doherty’s Open House

by | 10.22.2014 at 3:32pm
Superhero Clubhouse Performs "Salty Folk"
Photo Credit: Jane Rebecca Marchant

Visitors to Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory’s open house on Oct. 11 could tune in to a performance of “Salty Folk” by Superhero Clubhouse, a collective of artists and environmental advocates. Created by Jeremy Pickard and Nate Weida, the play uses music and humor to illustrate the history and importance of New York Harbor through the “eyes” of five oysters: Brook, Manny, Bronxy, Queeny and Stats.

Eye on the Storm

by | 10.14.2014 at 10:47am
adam sobel ocean breeze

Atmospheric scientist Adam Sobel is author of the new book “Storm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future.” Sobel was one of the first researchers to explain to media and the public what might be brewing, before the storm hit. In the aftermath, he looked closely at the factors driving the storm’s unusual ferocity, and how these played against human weaknesses. The book offers a primer on what drives storm systems, and what we know (and don’t) about their relation to warming climate. Sobel also looks into future weather, urban infrastructure and the politics of global climate change. He recently discussed some of his insights.

What Do Wildfires Have to Do with Climate Change?

by | 10.13.2014 at 1:11pm
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“Climate change has been making the fire season in the United States longer and on average more intense,” said John Holdren, President Obama’s science advisor. And, wildfires are not only intensified by climate change, they also exacerbate it.

Seeing Red: The Great Oxygenation Event

by | 10.6.2014 at 11:00am
David Walker leads students and colleagues on a geology tour of Columbia University.

In Part 4 of the Columbia Geology Tour, David Walker of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory explores the source of the red sandstone of Russell Hall at the Columbia Teachers College on 120th Street.

The Art and Science of Climate Change

by | 9.30.2014 at 3:34pm
Sebastião Salgado, Iceberg between Paulet Island and the South Shetland Islands on the Antarctic Channel. At sea level, earlier flotation levels are clearly visible where the ice has been polished by the ocean’s constant movement. High above, a shape resembling a castle tower has been carved by wind erosion and detached pieces of ice. The Antarctic Peninsula, 2005. © Sebastião Salgado/Amazonas images—Contact Press Images.

This fall, the photographs of Sebastião Salgado provide the springboard for an ambitious program of panel discussions, lectures and film screenings addressing the urgent issue of climate change, at the International Center of Photography in New York City.