Climate

Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. Photo: Hans-Petter Fjeld via Wikimedia Commons.

Climate and Cod

A new study finds that the climatological phenomenon known as the North Atlantic Oscillation contributes to fluctuations in the cod population off the New England coast, and could help fishery managers protect the population from future collapse.

by |July 27, 2016
Intern Addison Bent at work in the Lamont Core Repository. Photo: Rebecca Fowler

A Summer of Hands-on, Minds-On Science

Twelve students from New York and New Jersey are spending July in laboratories at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, working with the scientists. The internship program enables students to spend four weeks exploring what it means to be an earth scientist.

by |July 27, 2016
Photo: Joe Brusky

For Climate Change, Carbon Pricing is No Silver Bullet

Many economists and policy experts believe carbon pricing is the most effective way to deal with global warming. But others argue that carbon pricing is not a silver bullet for dealing with climate change. Here’s why.

by |July 18, 2016
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Connecting Space to Village in West Africa

A new project, SERVIR-West Africa, will use space-based climate, weather land cover, and other NASA satellite data to address issues such as food security and the availability of fresh water in Ghana, Burkina Faso, Senegal and Niger.

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The World’s First Seasonal Lightning Forecast

At about 250 lightning flashes per square kilometer per year, the Lake Maracaibo Basin in northwestern Venezuela has the highest annual lightning rate of any place in the world.

by |July 6, 2016
Photo: Takver

Carbon Pricing for the Climate: How It Could Work

Most economists and policy experts agree that the most effective and cheapest way to curb the carbon dioxide emissions that are warming the planet is to “put a price on carbon.” How effective are carbon taxes and cap and trade programs?

by |June 27, 2016
Farmers break into small groups to collect information about traditional indicators. Photo: Catherine Pomposi

Forecasting Climate, with Help from the Baobab Tree

To improve climate forecasts, scientists study the complex interactions and mechanisms within the climate system. But they also need to hear from potential users of climate information, such as farmers, to get a better understanding of how people may use that information in their decision making.

by |June 21, 2016
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Climate Game Challenge Finalists Announced

The Columbia Climate Center-led PoLAR Partnership, together with Autodesk and Games for Change are proud to announce the four finalists in the Games for Change Climate Challenge.

by |June 17, 2016
Martin Stute, a Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientists who will be giving a live-streamed seminar about the CarbFix Project, talks with Edda Sif Arradotir of Reykjavik Energy in front of the piping system that pumps emissions back underground. Photo: Kevin Krajick

Watch Live: Turning CO2 to Stone, Scientists Discuss a Climate Solution

On June 24, a scientist involved in the CarbFix carbon capture and storage project in Iceland will give a live-streamed presentation about the technology and the project’s success at turning CO2 to stone.

by |June 16, 2016
Asian elephants, like these in Sri Lanka, are sensitive to temperature. A new study explores the impact of warming on populations in the tropics. Photo: Amila Tennakoon, CC-BY-2.0

An Ecological Traffic Jam in the Warming Tropics?

The tropics are already hot, and they’re getting hotter as global temperatures rise. A new study offers a glimpse into how seriously a couple more degrees could disrupt the region’s ecological map.

by |June 9, 2016