Category: Climate

Getting a Whiff of Climate Change

by | 4.9.2014 at 11:24am
forest fire Wharton fire New York City

Monday was the day when millions of people in New York and New Jersey learned what climate change smells like, or at least what one of its aromas is.

Dissolving the Future of Coral Reefs

by | 4.9.2014 at 10:44am
DSCF3623

Coral reefs, some of the planet’s most beautiful and biodiverse ecosystems, face many natural and anthropogenic threats. Tremendous effort has gone into protecting and rehabilitating these reefs worldwide, but the mounting problem of ocean acidification has the potential to obliterate all progress made by marine scientists, conservationists, and policy-makers thus far.

Columbia Students Win Environmental Policy Competition

by | 4.9.2014 at 10:39am
From left: winners Andy Zhang, CC '16, Raymond de Oliveira, CC '16, and Francesca Audia, GS '15. Photo: Columbia Spectator

Three Columbia students recently won the top prize in the Columbia Economics Review’s annual environmental policy competition, which challenged students from eight universities to make policy recommendations addressing climate change.

Scientists Speak Out on Climate: Is Anyone Listening?

by | 4.9.2014 at 9:24am
Photo niOS

In the light of recent varied efforts to focus public attention on the risks of climate change, we asked Earth Institute scientists what they want the public to understand about the issue and how they see their roles.

From Theory to Reality: Closing the Carbon Loop

by | 4.8.2014 at 3:20pm
artificial trees, carbon capture

Carbon capture, storage and reuse has the potential to help us reduce CO2 emissions and combat global warming. The Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy is bringing together experts from an array of fields to assess the state of the technology April 14-16.

Climate Change: a Matter of Public Health

by | 4.7.2014 at 6:19pm
Women, babies, Ekwendeni Mission Hospital, Mzimba District, Malawi

People have tried to cast climate change as an environmental issue, a social justice issue and a development issue. Madeleine Thomson of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society argues climate change can be understood much better if we consider it an issue of global public health.

Student Research Showcase 2014

by | 4.7.2014 at 1:55pm
Students discuss research outcomes after video presentation.

The Earth Institute, Columbia University is proud to support student research in the areas of environment and sustainable development at the annual Student Research Showcase on April 25, 2014. Student interns, research assistants and travel grant recipients, and their Faculty and Research Advisors, will be honored for their research contributions that ranged in topics from biodiversity, urban planning, earth sciences to international development.

IPCC Says Managing Risks of Climate Change is Critical

by | 4.2.2014 at 1:52pm
floodedstreet--lahore-pakistan-fi

Among the key findings of the WGII AR5 Report chapter on human security, a topic highlighted in the Report for the first time, is that societies in conflict are more vulnerable to climate change.

The Isthmus of Panama: Out of the Deep Earth

by | 3.31.2014 at 3:53pm
Geologists are investigating igneous rocks from the deep earth that helped build the land bridge that joins North and South America. These are most visible along the windswept western coast of Panama. CLICK TO SEE A SLIDESHOW OF THE WORK

The creation of the narrow isthmus that joins North and South America changed not just the world map, but the circulation of oceans, the course of biologic evolution, and probably global climate. Scientists try to decipher the story behind its formation.

Photo Essay: Exploring the Rocks That Join the Americas

by | 3.31.2014 at 3:49pm
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The formation of the slender land bridge that joins South America and North America was a pivotal event in earth’s history. At its narrowest along the isthmus of Panama, it changed not just the world map, but the circulation of oceans, the course of biologic evolution, and global climate. Cornelia Class, a geochemist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, and Esteban Gazel, a Lamont adjunct researcher now based at Virginia Tech, are looking into a key factor: the Galápagos Plume.