Protecting Intellectual Property While Mitigating Climate Change: Can We Do Both?

The global transfer of clean development technologies, particularly from industrialized to developing countries, is complicated by the intellectual property regime.


Watch: Cities and the Climate Change Challenge

Join us for a symposium on Lessons of Climate Resilience in New York City this Wednesday, Oct. 19, from 6-7:15 p.m. in Low Library on the Columbia University campus.

by |October 18, 2016

Don’t Be Bewitched by Paris Climate Change Deal

“We can and should develop other agreements that ask countries to coordinate their actions rather than to reduce their emissions voluntarily. Countries are good at coordination, and not so good at volunteering to act in their collective interests.”

by |October 17, 2016

No Free Passes: Making Renewable Energy Responsible

As the world rushes to invest in clean energy, the potential impacts of these projects on the rights of local individuals and communities need to be properly addressed.


Leaving Fossil Fuels in the Ground: Who, What and When?

In order to promote a broader conversation on the issue of equity and stranded assets, Oxfam recently released a report discussing whether there is a reasonable case to be made that developing countries should get preferential treatment so that they bear less of the burden when it comes to having their assets stranded.

Antarctica. Courtesy of the Long Term Ecological Research Network

What Happens to Ecosystems When Antarctica’s Ice Melts?

A special section in the October issue of BioScience featuring research by Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory scientists examines the effects of intense melting on two Antarctic ecosystems, tracking impacts all the way from microbial food webs to shifting penguin populations.

by |October 13, 2016

Stranding Equitably in the Current Market and Geopolitical Context

The Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment’s conference of early November will consider, notably, how world production of oil and gas could be significantly reduced in manners protecting the interests of lower-income producing countries, given that staying on carbon budget will require leaving two thirds of our fossil fuel reserves unburnt.


Shareholders Turn Up the Heat on Climate Change

2016 was a hot year for climate change shareholder resolutions hitting the boardrooms of oil and gas companies. Although more familiar climate news headlines have carried calls to “keep it in the ground” and divest investment portfolios from fossil fuels, a patient strategy has been quietly gaining momentum: shareholder engagement on climate change.

Fossilized leaves hold evidence of a sharp increase in carbon dioxide levels as the Antarctic ice sheet began to shrink 23 million years ago, a new study finds. This magnified image of a fossilized Litsea calicarioides leaf clearly shows the stomata, through which leaves take in CO2 and release oxygen. (Tammo Reichgelt/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)

Ancient Leaves Link Loss of Antarctic Ice to a CO2 Spike

Twenty-three million years ago, the Antarctic Ice Sheet began to shrink, going from an expanse larger than today’s to one about half its modern size. Ancient fossilized leaves retrieved from a lake bed in New Zealand now show for the first time that carbon dioxide levels increased dramatically over a relatively short period of time as the ice sheet began to deteriorate.

by |October 12, 2016

Protecting Indigenous Land Rights Makes Good Economic Sense

Indigenous peoples and other communities hold and manage 50 to 65 percent of the world’s land, yet governments recognize only 10 percent as legally belonging to these groups, with another 8 percent designated by governments for communities. That’s bad economic policy.