Category: Climate

Faint Young Sun

by | 8.22.2014 at 10:31am
Image credit: Science online, J.F. Kasting

Through an ancient looking-glass,
Perhaps you’d see more H2 gas,
And if with denser gas collided,
Greater greenhouse warmth provided.

Reflections of a Changing North

by | 8.22.2014 at 8:48am
The Kullorsuaq waterfront. (Photo M. Turrin)

No one ever leaves the field the same way they entered it. Yes there is a new layer of mud on equipment, the expected wear and tear on your personal gear and your physical being, but that is not what I am referring to. I am acknowledging the intangible shift in perspective from a deepened understanding and a broadened vision that has been provided by the experience, and beyond that the questions that drive the next field campaign.

Webinar Sept. 8 on Proposed Sustainable Development Goals

by | 8.21.2014 at 5:03pm
UN OWG SDG image18_1913

Researcher Magdalena A K Muir will present a live webinar, “The UN Sustainable Development Goals: Setting an Agenda for Sustainability,” as part of the Association for Environmental Studies and Educators Webinar Series.

Major Gift Will Expand Center for Climate Change Law

by | 8.18.2014 at 9:40am
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Columbia Law School’s Center for Climate Change Law will be newly expanded with a major gift from the Andrew Sabin Family Foundation. The center, an affiliate of the Earth Institute, has been renamed the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law.

Studies Find Climate Change to Disrupt Antarctic and Tropical Ecosystems

by | 8.14.2014 at 3:17pm
Krill shortages will impact Adélie penguins’ foraging and reproductive abilities.

A recent study finds that West Antarctica’s ecosystem is highly correlated to its climate. As a result, climate change will have a negative impact on its ecological relationships, from plankton to penguins. Antarctica isn’t alone – climate change will also affect tropical ocean ecosystems by causing mass coral bleaching.

Ocean Sediments Tell a Surprising Climate Story

by | 8.13.2014 at 11:04am
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Geochemists Alexander van Geen and Jacob Mey helped coauthor a recent paper in the leading journal Science showing that warming climate in the future may not degrade oxygen supplies in some parts of the oceans as previously thought.

A Summit for Young Climate Leaders

by | 8.8.2014 at 11:52am
Participants discuss the launch of a research project on Clean Development Mechanisms at the first CliMates International Summit, Paris, October 2012.

We created CliMates in 2011. Our dream was to find new ways for youth worldwide to work together on climate change. In less than a year, CliMates grew into a network of several hundred students and young professionals across all continents and from different academic backgrounds. This year, the 2nd CliMates International Summit will take place in New York City from Aug. 25-29. This event will experiment with new ways to educate and train participants, introducing them to new approaches to dealing with climate issues.

Climate Change or Public Health: Which Matters More?

by | 8.1.2014 at 11:23am
climate change, public health

A new study by Earth Institute researchers suggests that talking about the human health impacts of air pollution related to burning fossil fuels might make a more convincing argument for action among conservatives, who are generally more skeptical of the scientific evidence for climate change.

A ‘Bumper-Car’ Ride in the Ice Mélange

by | 7.29.2014 at 10:28am
Glacier in front of Alison Iceberg (Photo M. Turrin)

Today’s plan is to extend the sampling to include a wider region of the water exchange between Alison (Nanatakavsaup), the surrounding ocean and the connection to Hayes glacier. At the Village Meeting we had queried the local fisherman about the iceberg exit pathways for both Alison and Hayes to confirm or correct information we have gleaned from satellite imagery.

World Trade Center Ship Traced to Colonial-Era Philadelphia

by | 7.28.2014 at 8:57am
The ship was identified as a Hudson River Sloop, designed by New York’s first European settlers, the Dutch, to carry passengers and cargo in shallow, rocky waters.  In the 1970s, folk singer and activist Pete Seeger built a Hudson River Sloop replica named Clearwater, and used it as a platform to lobby for the removal of toxic PCBs and other pollutants from the Hudson. (Anthony Pepitone)

Four years ago this month, archeologists monitoring the excavation of the former World Trade Center site uncovered a ghostly surprise: the bones of an ancient sailing ship. In a new study, scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory say that an old growth forest in the Philadelphia area supplied the white oak used in the ship’s frame, and that the trees were probably cut in 1773 or so—a few years before the bloody war that established America’s independence from Britain.