Climate

Falling sulfur dioxide emissions in the United States are expected to substantially increase rainfall in Africa’s semi-arid Sahel, while bringing slightly more rain to much of the U.S., according to a new study. (Francesco Fiondella/International Research Institute for Climate and Society

Reduced U.S. Air Pollution Will Boost Rainfall in Africa’s Sahel, Says Study

If U.S. sulfur dioxide emissions are cut to zero by 2100, as some researchers have projected they will be, rainfall over Africa’s Sahel region could increase up to 10 percent from 2000 levels, computer simulations suggest.

by |May 22, 2017
The "Ice Pod" instrument array deployed off the side of a military cargo plane over Antarctica. Photo: Winnie Chu/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Lamont Scientists Are Focus of NY Times Multimedia Series

This past winter, reporters from the New York Times went along for the ride with scientists from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory as they flew their mission of discovery over Antarctica.

by |May 22, 2017
Vikings were here, but thousands of years earlier Stone Age people were, too. D'Andrea's team hikes down to core a small pond next to the remnants of these people's sea-side dwellings.

Coring Arctic Lakes to Study Vikings

Billy D’Andrea, a Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory paleoclimatologist and Center for Climate and Life Fellow, is investigating the relationship between environmental change and characteristics of early settlements in Norway’s Lofoten Islands.

by |May 22, 2017
A NOAA water level monitoring station with an acoustic sensor on Dauphin Island, Alabama. Such tide gauges along the U.S. coast give scientists a baseline of sea level changes dating at least to the 19th century. Photo: NOAA/courtesy Morgan McHugh

Researchers Model Differences in East Coast Sea Level Rise

For years, scientists have been warning of a so-called “hot spot” of accelerated sea-level rise along the northeastern U.S. coast. But accurately modeling this acceleration as well as variations in sea-level rise from one region to another has proven challenging. Now new research offers the first comprehensive model for understanding differences in sea level rise along North America’s East Coast.

by |May 18, 2017
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A Small Senate Victory Maintains Methane Regulation

While I see little hope of modernizing the environmental regulatory structure under the current regime, last week provided some hope that the U.S. Senate won’t allow our environmental laws to be dismantled.

by |May 15, 2017
Sheean T Haley speaking

Why I Decided to Stand Up for Climate Science

A young researcher explains why she is taking to advocacy for science.

by |May 10, 2017
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Database Tracks Global Climate Law

A new online database is tracking climate change legislation around the world. The tool was launched this week in a joint effort by the Sabin Center for Change Law and the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.

by |May 9, 2017
The Waggonwaybreen glacier in Svalbard. Photo: Andreas Weith

The Glaciers Are Going

Glaciers around the world have retreated at unprecedented rates and some have disappeared altogether. The melting of glaciers will affect drinking water supplies, water needed to grow food and supply energy, as well as global sea levels.

by |May 5, 2017
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Sabin Center Launches Database of State Environmental Actions

The Sabin Center for Climate Change Law has partnered with StateAG.org to launch a new database to track environmental actions undertaken by state attorneys general.

by |May 3, 2017
Heavy smoke blanketed Sumatra and Borneo in September and October 2015, as observed by NASA’s Terra satellite. (NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response.)

Rising Temperatures Lead to Increased Fire Risk in Indonesia

A new paper shows that rising temperatures have increased the risk of fires even during non-drought years in Indonesia, possibly making mild fire seasons in the country a thing of the past.

by |May 1, 2017