Author: Renee Cho

Renee Cho is a staff blogger for the Earth Institute and a freelance environmental writer who has written for www.insideclimatenews.com, E Magazine and On Earth. Previously, Renee was Communications Coordinator for Riverkeeper, the Hudson River environmental organization. She is currently in the certificate program at Columbia University’s Center for Environmental Research and Conservation.

Revitalizing Africa’s Soils

by | 9.24.2014 at 8:53pm
Farmers in Tanzania. Photo: Gates Foundation

To feed our burgeoning global population, the world has to at least double crop yields by 2050, by improving seeds of high yielding crops and cultivating healthy fertile soils. A new on-the-spot soil testing kit will help meet this challenge.

How Climate Change Is Exacerbating the Spread of Disease

by | 9.4.2014 at 10:38pm
Malaria mosquito taking a blood meal

Contagious diseases are on the rise as a result of climate change and other rapid environmental and social changes. A number of climate-sensitive diseases are expected to worsen with higher temperatures and more extreme weather.

Solving the Mysteries of Carbon Dioxide

by | 7.30.2014 at 8:38pm
OCO-2. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech

About 50 percent of the CO2 produced by human activity remains in the atmosphere, warming the planet. But scientists don’t know where and how oceans and plants have absorbed the rest of the manmade CO2. To try to answer these questions, on July 2, 2014, NASA launched the $468 million Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), its first Earth remote sensing satellite dedicated to studying atmospheric carbon dioxide from space.

Making Progress on Deforestation

by | 6.23.2014 at 8:47pm
The Amazon rainforest. Photo: CIFOR

In 2005, Brazil was losing more forest each year than any other country. Today, Brazil has reduced deforestation in the Amazon by 70 percent. Seventeen countries across four continents have also shown progress in reducing tropical deforestation. But there is still a long way to go.

The Fracking Facts

by | 6.6.2014 at 1:25pm
Aerial view of the Jonah natural gas field in Wyoming. Photo: Peter Aengst

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, the controversial method for extracting natural gas, has become a hot button issue across the U.S. But let’s try to look objectively at its benefits and risks.

Climate Change’s Bottom Line

by | 5.14.2014 at 2:39pm | 1 Comment
Desertcrop2

In the face of climate change, companies cannot continue to do “business as usual.” The risks and challenges of the changing climate threaten the bottom line, but also offer unprecedented opportunities.

Scientists Speak Out on Climate: Is Anyone Listening?

by | 4.9.2014 at 9:24am
Photo niOS

In the light of recent varied efforts to focus public attention on the risks of climate change, we asked Earth Institute scientists what they want the public to understand about the issue and how they see their roles.

The Promise and Peril of Nanotechnology

by | 3.25.2014 at 6:42pm
Computer rendered view inside a carbon nanotube. Photo: Geoff Hutchison

Nanotechnology is one of the fastest growing areas of science, engineering and industry that is used in more and more consumer products each day. It has great potential to transform our world for the better. But what are its implications for human health and the environment?

Joanne Johnson and Lamont-Doherty, Collaborating on Glacial Research

by | 2.28.2014 at 10:50am
Joanne Johnson

New research about West Antarctica’s Pine Island Glacier suggests the glacier’s recent and rapid thinning and melting may continue for decades or centuries to come. British Antarctic Survey’s Joanne Johnson’s research, done in collaboration with scientists at Lamont-Doherty, might not have been possible without Lamont’s effort to promote women scientists.

Terry Plank: Volcano Maven

by | 2.14.2014 at 6:10pm
TPcomputersmile

“It just looked like black rock, but every once in awhile a boulder at the end would fall off and you’d see it was completely red inside. And it made all these cool sounds and you’d feel these little earthquakes… It was totally cool. How could you not like that?”