Renee Cho

Renee Cho is a staff blogger for the Earth Institute and a freelance environmental writer who has written for www.insideclimatenews.com, E Magazine and On Earth. Previously, Renee was Communications Coordinator for Riverkeeper, the Hudson River environmental organization. She received the Executive Education Certificate in Conservation and Sustainability from the Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability.

Recent Posts

Photo: NOAA/Stuart Rankin

El Niño and Global Warming—What’s the Connection?

The United Nations has declared 2015 the hottest year since record keeping began. It was also a year marked by the occurrence of a “super” El Niño. Are the warming temperatures and El Niño connected?

by |February 2, 2016
American Samoa  Photo: XLCatlinSeaviewSurvey

#100. Taking a Fresh Look at Five Issues

This is the 100th blog I’ve written for the State of the Planet. It seemed like a good occasion to take a look at my five most popular blogs to see what has changed in the years since they were written. Is the news better or worse for seawater greenhouses, plastic pollution, turning wastewater into drinking water, coral reefs and rare earth metals?

by |January 14, 2016
The climate agreement is adopted.

Understanding the Paris Climate Accord and Its Implications

On Saturday, Dec. 12, 2015, 195 countries reached a history-making agreement to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions in order to avert the direst effects of climate change. Here are some of the best and most reliable resources to help you understand the Paris accord and its implications.

by |December 15, 2015
Sky Vegetables in the Bronx

How Sustainable is Vertical Farming? Students Try to Answer the Question

Vertical farming is touted as a solution to the drawbacks of traditional agriculture, but how sustainable is it really? A team of students attempts to design a certification system to assess the sustainability of vertical farms.

by |December 10, 2015
NASA's supercomputer model created this simulation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
Photo: NASA/GSFC

Six Tough Questions About Climate Change

People often ask certain tough questions about climate change— about the costs of cutting carbon emissions, the feasibility of transitioning to renewable energy, and whether it’s already too late to do anything about climate change. Laura Segafredo, manager of the Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project, answers these questions.

by |November 30, 2015
The difference in average surface temperatures from 1970-79 (bottom) to 2000-09 (top) due to global warming. Photo: NASA

The Paris Climate Change Conference – What You Need to Know

The United Nations Climate Change Conference, meeting in Paris from Nov. 30 to Dec. 11, brings together world leaders to craft a new international agreement to keep the average global temperature rise below 2°C by 2100. Here’s what you need to know about it.

by |November 11, 2015
OvalOffice

The Presidential Candidates on Climate Change

The presidential election of 2016 will determine the United States’ role in confronting the global challenge of climate change, and preparing our nation to manage its impacts for years to come. Where do the presidential candidates stand today on these issues?

by |October 26, 2015

How Much Energy Does NYC Waste?

While the New York metropolitan area has been deemed the most wasteful megacity in the world, New York City is considered one of the world’s greenest. But how much energy does New York City waste and what is it doing about it?

Computer lab in Mayange, Rwanda.

Leave No One Behind: The Sustainable Development Goals

At the end of September, all 193 member countries of the United Nations have agreed to adopt the Sustainable Development Goals towards eradicating poverty, protecting the planet and advancing prosperity by 2030. What do they hope to accomplish and why do they matter?

by |September 14, 2015
The State Capitol in Sacramento, California. Photo: roamandshoot

The Growing Groundwater Crisis

Groundwater is being depleted at alarming rates, not only in drought-stricken California, but around the world. When groundwater is depleted, it can take tens to hundreds of years to for it to reestablish its sustainable level, if at all. What can be done to avert a water crisis?

by |August 3, 2015