Renee Cho

Renee Cho is a staff blogger for the Earth Institute. She has written over 125 blogs for State of the Planet on a broad range of topics. She was previously published by www.insideclimatenews.com, E Magazine and On Earth Magazine. Renee was Communications Coordinator for Riverkeeper, the Hudson River environmental organization. She received the Executive Education Certificate in Conservation and Sustainability from the Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability. Follow me on Twitter: @ReneeCho_

Recent Posts

Google is part owner of Ivanpah in Nipton,CA, the world's largest solar power plant. Photo: Dennis Schroeder/NREL

How the U.S. Might Fulfill Its Paris Pledge Without the White House

States, cities, and businesses are trying to pick up the federal government’s slack to fight climate change. How big of a difference can they make?

by |October 17, 2017
U.S. Army personnel drive through flood waters in Fort Ransom, ND. Photo: US Army

What the U.S. Military is Doing About Climate Change

The White House may deny that climate change is happening, but the Department of Defense has been taking action for years to avoid and adapt to climate-related disasters.

by |September 20, 2017
Handshake_Flazingo

6 Climate Change Solutions We Can All Agree On

These ideas hold merit no matter where you fall on the political spectrum

by |September 11, 2017
Photo: Sharon Mollerus

What Changes Minds About Climate Change?

More Americans are coming to agree with the vast majority of climate scientists who say human-induced climate change is really happening. Here’s what works, and what doesn’t, when communicating with skeptics.

by |August 9, 2017
JAS17_World_pcp copy

What’s in the Forecast and How Do We Know?

The Earth Institute’s International Research Institute for Climate and Society makes probabilistic forecasts for rainfall and temperature for the next six months. How does it do this?

by |July 12, 2017
Photo: Richard Unten

How Drones are Advancing Scientific Research

Where once scientists could only observe earth from above by using manned aircraft or satellites, today they are expanding, developing and refining their research in a variety of ways thanks to drones.

by |June 16, 2017
The Gulf Stream

Could Climate Change Shut Down the Gulf Stream?

In the 2004 disaster movie “The Day After Tomorrow,”, global warming accelerated the melting of polar ice, disrupting circulation in the North Atlantic Ocean and triggering violent changes in the weather. Could climate change shut down the Gulf Stream?

by |June 6, 2017
The Waggonwaybreen glacier in Svalbard. Photo: Andreas Weith

The Glaciers Are Going

Glaciers around the world have retreated at unprecedented rates and some have disappeared altogether. The melting of glaciers will affect drinking water supplies, water needed to grow food and supply energy, as well as global sea levels.

by |May 5, 2017
Brooklyn Microgrid
Photo: LO3 Energy

Microgrids: Taking Steps Toward the 21st Century Smart Grid

Microgrids, networks of linked energy sources that are connected to the main grid, but are able to operate independently if power is lost, are the building blocks of the 21st century smart grid. Why aren’t there more of them?

by |April 18, 2017
Scientists studying glaciers in Glacier National Park. Photo: GlacierNPS

How We Know Today’s Climate Change Is Not Natural

Despite the many climate “skeptics” in key positions of power today, 97 percent of climate scientists agree that the warming of Earth’s climate over the last 100 years is mainly due to human activity. Why are they so sure?

by |April 4, 2017