Renee Cho

Renee Cho is a staff blogger for the Earth Institute and a freelance environmental writer who has written for, E Magazine and On Earth. Previously, Renee was Communications Coordinator for Riverkeeper, the Hudson River environmental organization. She received the Executive Education Certificate in Conservation and Sustainability from the Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability. Follow me on Twitter: @ReneeCho_

Recent Posts

Photo: Jan Truter

Putting Garbage to Good Use with Waste-to-Energy

Burning garbage to produce electricity is a strategy for sustainable waste management that is finding favor in Europe and China. Why isn’t it practiced more in the U.S.?

by |October 18, 2016
Heat wave over Queens. Photo: Chris Goldberg

NYC’s Heat Waves: A Harbinger of Things to Come?

As global temperatures rise and heat records are broken, many wonder if New York City’s heat waves this summer were a result of climate change, and if we will experience more of them in the future.

by |September 27, 2016
Due to global warming the polar bear's habitat has changed drastically. Photo: Gerard Van der Leun

Climate Week: Why Does It Matter?

Climate Week NYC 2016, Sept. 19 to 35, features over 70 events bringing together business, societal and government leaders to share ideas, technologies, resources and success stories that are helping to curb climate change and transition to a low-carbon society.

by |September 15, 2016
Photo: Richard Rydge

Turning Sunlight into Fuel

The world uses little more than one percent of the sun’s energy for our electricity needs. A major obstacle to tapping into its full potential is that it is intermittent. Solar fuels could one day store, transport and use solar energy to produce electricity and replace fossil fuels in vehicles.

by |August 24, 2016
Photo: Joe Brusky

For Climate Change, Carbon Pricing is No Silver Bullet

Many economists and policy experts believe carbon pricing is the most effective way to deal with global warming. But others argue that carbon pricing is not a silver bullet for dealing with climate change. Here’s why.

by |July 18, 2016
Photo: Takver

Carbon Pricing for the Climate: How It Could Work

Most economists and policy experts agree that the most effective and cheapest way to curb the carbon dioxide emissions that are warming the planet is to “put a price on carbon.” How effective are carbon taxes and cap and trade programs?

by |June 27, 2016

Helping Senegalese Farmers with Smart Solar

An Earth Institute pilot project has brought smart solar power to farmers in Senegal, making agriculture more efficient, economical and sustainable.

by |June 7, 2016

Trump vs. Clinton: What the Election Could Mean for Climate Policy

The outcome of this year’s presidential election could have far-reaching implications for the fate of our planet because the two presumptive candidates, Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump, have very different ideas about climate change. What will they do about the Paris accord and climate change?

by |May 18, 2016
A green facade in Italy Photo: Anna Positano

The How and Why of Green Building

Buildings account for almost a third of global greenhouse gas emissions and the U.N. Environment Programme projects that if we continue with business as usual in the building sector, these emissions will double by 2030. Fortunately, green building is on the rise around the world.

by |May 3, 2016
Fish farming in Marseille, France
Photo: marcovdz

Making Fish Farming More Sustainable

Global per capita fish consumption has almost doubled in the last 50 years. And today, about half of all the seafood we eat is produced through fish farming, aquaculture. Can it be done sustainably?

by |April 13, 2016