Author: Renee Cho

Renee Cho is a staff blogger for the Earth Institute and a freelance environmental writer who has written for www.insideclimatenews.com, E Magazine and On Earth. Previously, Renee was Communications Coordinator for Riverkeeper, the Hudson River environmental organization. She received the Executive Education Certificate in Conservation and Sustainability from the Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability.

Report Forecasts Worsening Climate Hazards for Region

by | 2.17.2015 at 2:54pm
NPCC's updated flood risk map

A new report gives a worrisome picture of climate-related problems the New York region will likely face this century. Temperatures are projected to rise, extreme precipitation and heat waves will be more frequent, and sea level could rise as much as 6 feet.

Climate Change Poses Challenges to Plants and Animals

by | 2.3.2015 at 6:35pm
The mountain pygmy possum. Photo: Phil Spark

Because of climate change, spring, summer, fall and winter in the temperate zones are all arriving on average 1.7 days earlier than they ever have before. The changing climate with its more extreme weather is affecting many plant and animal species, disturbing their habitat and disrupting ecosystem functioning. How will plants and animals deal with these challenges?

Rebuilding After Hurricane Sandy

by | 1.21.2015 at 7:24pm
Rebuilding in Sea Bright, NJ Photo: FEMA

In June 2013, the Rebuild by Design competition was launched to find innovative solutions to the vulnerabilities of the region that Sandy exposed. The six winning projects were chosen for their excellence in design and resilience, and engagement with local communities. How will they protect their communities?

Toxic Chemicals All Around Us: Is Green Chemistry the Answer?

by | 12.8.2014 at 3:40pm
Photo: Queens University

We live in a world filled with synthetic chemicals, many with known or suspected health hazards. Can green chemistry, the design of chemical products without hazardous substances, provide a solution?

The Greening of China

by | 11.8.2014 at 12:41am | 1 Comment
Photo: Asian Development Bank

China became the world’s largest carbon polluter in 2006, surpassing the U.S. But it is also rapidly going green through cutting coal use, investing heavily in renewable energy and launching the world’s largest carbon trading system.

What Do Wildfires Have to Do with Climate Change?

by | 10.13.2014 at 1:11pm
Deerfire_

“Climate change has been making the fire season in the United States longer and on average more intense,” said John Holdren, President Obama’s science advisor. And, wildfires are not only intensified by climate change, they also exacerbate it.

Revitalizing Africa’s Soils

by | 9.24.2014 at 8:53pm
Farmers in Tanzania. Photo: Gates Foundation

To feed our burgeoning global population, the world has to at least double crop yields by 2050, by improving seeds of high yielding crops and cultivating healthy fertile soils. A new on-the-spot soil testing kit will help meet this challenge.

How Climate Change Is Exacerbating the Spread of Disease

by | 9.4.2014 at 10:38pm
Malaria mosquito taking a blood meal

Contagious diseases are on the rise as a result of climate change and other rapid environmental and social changes. A number of climate-sensitive diseases are expected to worsen with higher temperatures and more extreme weather.

Solving the Mysteries of Carbon Dioxide

by | 7.30.2014 at 8:38pm
OCO-2. Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech

About 50 percent of the CO2 produced by human activity remains in the atmosphere, warming the planet. But scientists don’t know where and how oceans and plants have absorbed the rest of the manmade CO2. To try to answer these questions, on July 2, 2014, NASA launched the $468 million Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), its first Earth remote sensing satellite dedicated to studying atmospheric carbon dioxide from space.

Making Progress on Deforestation

by | 6.23.2014 at 8:47pm
The Amazon rainforest. Photo: CIFOR

In 2005, Brazil was losing more forest each year than any other country. Today, Brazil has reduced deforestation in the Amazon by 70 percent. Seventeen countries across four continents have also shown progress in reducing tropical deforestation. But there is still a long way to go.