Author: Renee Cho

Renee Cho is a staff blogger for the Earth Institute and a freelance environmental writer who has written for www.insideclimatenews.com, E Magazine and On Earth. Previously, Renee was Communications Coordinator for Riverkeeper, the Hudson River environmental organization. She received the Executive Education Certificate in Conservation and Sustainability from the Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability.

H. James Simpson; Tracked Pollutants in the Hudson and Far Beyond

by | 5.26.2015 at 2:32pm
Simpson-H-James crop

H. James Simpson, a geochemist who pioneered important studies of water pollutants in the Hudson River and abroad, died May 10. He had been affiliated with Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory for 50 years. The cause was Parkinson’s disease, said his family; he was 72.

Putting Knowledge to Work in the Real World: The Capstone Projects

by | 5.11.2015 at 9:58am
Bo Ra Kim presents her team's project on marine debris.

The study of sustainability management and environmental policy is put to the test when applied to solving real world problems. Students in Columbia University’s Master of Science in Sustainability Management and Master of Public Administration in Environmental Science and Policy programs presented their final capstone projects done for real clients.

Why Happiness Is Important

by | 4.23.2015 at 6:35pm
Happy Tibetan Buddhist monk

The World Happiness Report 2015 measures and ranks the happiness of individuals in 158 countries around the globe. Which countries are the happiest and why?

As a Leading Environmental Organization Closes, Its Leader is Upbeat

by | 4.22.2015 at 8:03am
Lester Brown. Photo: KFEM

Lester Brown, the global environmental leader, turned 81 this year and is closing The Earth Policy Institute, the environmental research organization he founded in 2001. His new book “The Great Transition” asserts that the world is shifting from fossil fuels to solar and wind energy.

Paying to Protect the Environment

by | 3.31.2015 at 4:06pm
MuirWoods

Ecosystems provide humankind with food, fuel and fiber; they help clean the air and water, control flooding and regulate climate. Now, a group of scientists has laid out guidelines to gauge how effective we are at setting a price on such benefits of nature.

As Los Angeles Heats Up, Fog Fades

by | 3.11.2015 at 5:07pm
Photo: Wing-chiPoon

A new study has found that urbanization around coastal Southern California is driving fog away and causing the low clouds, crucial for providing shade and moderating temperatures in summer, to rise. This trend has important implications for ecosystems and cities.

Report Forecasts Worsening Climate Hazards for Region

by | 2.17.2015 at 2:54pm
NPCC's updated flood risk map

A new report gives a worrisome picture of climate-related problems the New York region will likely face this century. Temperatures are projected to rise, extreme precipitation and heat waves will be more frequent, and sea level could rise as much as 6 feet.

Climate Change Poses Challenges to Plants and Animals

by | 2.3.2015 at 6:35pm
The mountain pygmy possum. Photo: Phil Spark

Because of climate change, spring, summer, fall and winter in the temperate zones are all arriving on average 1.7 days earlier than they ever have before. The changing climate with its more extreme weather is affecting many plant and animal species, disturbing their habitat and disrupting ecosystem functioning. How will plants and animals deal with these challenges?

Rebuilding After Hurricane Sandy

by | 1.21.2015 at 7:24pm
Rebuilding in Sea Bright, NJ Photo: FEMA

In June 2013, the Rebuild by Design competition was launched to find innovative solutions to the vulnerabilities of the region that Sandy exposed. The six winning projects were chosen for their excellence in design and resilience, and engagement with local communities. How will they protect their communities?

Toxic Chemicals All Around Us: Is Green Chemistry the Answer?

by | 12.8.2014 at 3:40pm
Photo: Queens University

We live in a world filled with synthetic chemicals, many with known or suspected health hazards. Can green chemistry, the design of chemical products without hazardous substances, provide a solution?