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Stephanie Bush of Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (left) and Chiara Borelli of the University of Rochester emerge from the research submarine Alvin after the first dive. Photo: Bridgit Boulahanis

The Magic of Exploring Under the Sea

It’s midnight on the ship, and the labs are filled with scientists busy examining samples. Two of them just got back from a trip to the seafloor, and the excitement is palpable.

by |July 31, 2016
Aboard research cruises, the teams work around the clock, using every precious second of sea time. Scientists launched Sentry in the evening and monitored its progress through the night. Photo: Bridgit Boulahanis

Life Aboard a Research Cruise: 24-Hour Workdays, Amazing Discoveries

When scientists say “research cruise,” they aren’t talking about sunny afternoons of shuffleboard and margaritas on deck. Life aboard a research vessel means tight spaces, few amenities, and long workdays.

by |July 30, 2016
The AUV Sentry discovered an area of seafloor where methane is bubbling up, similar to the earlier photo. The data will be used to plan the team's next dive with scientists inside a submersible. Photo: NOAA

Roving the Abyss: It Takes a Team

Bridgit’s first mission with the autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) Sentry was a rousing success, including locating a patch of seafloor where methane is bubbling up.

by |July 29, 2016
Lamont's Bridgit Boulahanis, Sentry Coordinator for the research training cruise, gives a presentation to the ship's science party and telepresence group. Sentry is a UAV that the team is using to explore the sea floor. Photo courtesy of Bridgit Boulahanis

When Doing Science at Sea, Prepare to Adapt

Bridgit’s research training cruise started with a fundamental lesson of ocean science: Science at sea requires constant adaptation. Morning fog meant rewriting dive plans and reconsidering priorities.

by |July 29, 2016
Scientists can experience the sea floor up close in the human-operated vehicle Alvin. Photo: Bridgit Boulahanis

Going Deep for Science

Bridgit Boulahanis, a marine geophysics graduate student at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, prepares to head out on her first research cruise exploring the seafloor with underwater vehicles.

by |July 28, 2016
Bento Rodrigues, destroyed by a flood of chemical-laced water and sludge after a tailings dam collapsed in Brazil in November 2015.

Shareholder Litigation Puts a Spotlight on Environmental Risk

Lawsuits based on corporate misrepresentations to investors are gaining attention from those who want to see companies held more accountable for environmental damage–including risks associated with climate change.

by |July 11, 2016
Worn-out pipes and other infrastructure can add to the risks for water contamination. Photo: @picJim / Flickr / Creative Commons

Presidential Politics: Water Supply and Contamination

The federal government needs to develop and implement a plan to solve problems with our water infrastructure, pollution and growing scarcity. How will the next president act?

by |June 29, 2016
peace bird painting crop2

Environmental Peace-Building in the Middle East

The next part of our tour provided an excellent example of the challenges people working toward environmental peace-building in Israel, Jordan and Palestine face: a site that we were unable to visit.

by |June 24, 2016
Sinkhole, Dead Sea, Israel. Photo: Lena Gregorian

Dead Pool: the Depletion of a Shared Natural Resource

The Dead Sea could soon enough become a dead “pool” of sea. But perhaps there’s another alternative.

by |June 23, 2016
In East Jerusalem, neighborhoods like this are largely unplanned. Both road construction and housing construction is unpermitted and thus not eligible to receive municipal services.  Photo: Alejandra Pérez-Plá

Land and Conflict in East Jerusalem: the Role of Urban Planning

Without an urban civil culture, it is impossible to promote political and economic participation, and a non-unified Jerusalem will remain.

by |June 22, 2016