Guest Blogger

GIS

Undergraduates Will Develop Green Geodatabase for University

Giovani Graziosi is a Lecturer in Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology An undergraduate course in the Sustainable Development Program recently received a Course Support grant from the Earth Institute to conduct a special fieldwork project to develop the Columbia University Green Geodatabase (CUGG).   The grant provides support to acquire some of the equipment and a… read more

by |July 24, 2015
A cluster of towering cumulus clouds off the coast of El Salvador. The photograph was taken on May 31, 2002, from the International Space Station. Image courtesy of the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, NASA Johnson Space Center, at http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov [Photo ID ISS004-E-12656]

Spontaneous Clumping of Tropical Clouds

If you take a look at nearly any satellite image of clouds in the tropics, you’ll notice that the clouds tend to be organized into clusters. One specific type of cloud organization called “self-aggregation.” Self-aggregation is the tendency of tropical clouds to spontaneously clump together, solely due to interactions between the clouds and the surrounding environment.

by |July 23, 2015
In Honduras, 46 percent of the population lives in rural areas, and people must often travel long distances to get to the nearest pharmacy. This pharmacist is part of a network of 301 trained volunteers in a community pharmacy program run by FUDEIMFA, a partner of Global Partnerships. This network of women operate home-based pharmacies in their rural communities, providing local access to affordable anti-diarrheal medications, painkillers and other kinds of essential medicines. Photo © Global Partnerships.

Impact Partnerships, with Return on Investment

Philanthropy has evolved dramatically in recent years, changing the way individuals, organizations and foundations support the causes that concern them most. One manifestation of this evolution includes an array of sophisticated methods of investing in social causes while expecting a return, known as impact investing.

by |July 23, 2015
Exhuma, Bahamas, geology

Head for the Hills

While we spent much of our time examining corals and swamps, studying sea level and storms, we became fascinated by a simple question: How did the hills of Exuma form?

by |July 21, 2015
Handbook in Arabic

Conflict Resolution in the Arab World: a Knowledge-Sharing Agenda

In 2005, colleagues working in conflict resolution and peace-building in Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Israel, Palestine and Syria approached Columbia University’s International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution with a request for science-based resources on constructive engagement made available in Arabic.

by |July 17, 2015
6036180764_327b4cf6f1_b

Helping Youth Develop Skills for a Global Economy

Today, on July 15th, we celebrate the first annual World Youth Skills Day, which recognizes that young people need technical and vocational education to excel at both the local and global level.

by |July 15, 2015

Help for Indian Small Farmers in a Changing Climate

While a much-needed insurance reform is a welcome change in the Indian agricultural sector, enabling smallholders to be self-sufficient in the wake of climate change and India’s alarming problem of groundwater depletion would be an added plus.

A Glacier on the Antarctic Peninsula. Photo: Margie Turrin.

Antarctica’s Retreating Ice

While the ice sheets on West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula are usually the ones to make the news in relation to climate change, recent studies have documented transformations that are taking place on the East Antarctic Ice Sheet as well. On the continent as a whole, large areas of ice have already melted and this trend shows no sign of slowing, meaning the implications for global sea level rise in this century could be more dramatic than earlier projections anticipated.

by |June 30, 2015
Students coring in the Bahamas. Photo: Maayan Yehudai

Sediment Cores from Exuma’s Shores

Because we know little about hurricane behavior during periods when Earth was warmer or colder than at present, it’s challenging to construct models to predict future trends in hurricane activity as Earth’s climate changes. To remedy this problem, researchers have been working to reconstruct records of hurricane strikes in the past.

by |June 16, 2015
Mount Everest

Mt. Everest Not Safe from Climate Change

Climate change has many asking if the days of being able to summit the world’s highest peak are numbered.

by |June 12, 2015