Earth Institute, Author at State of the Planet - Page 2 of 22

Alex Halliday

Pioneering Oxford Geoscientist Alex Halliday to Head Columbia University’s Earth Institute

Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger today announced his appointment of Alexander N. Halliday, a geochemistry professor at University of Oxford and vice president of the UK’s Royal Society, as the new Director of Columbia’s Earth Institute.

by |December 14, 2017
Mike Tuckfelt

Environmental Science and Policy Program Strengthens Its Commitment to Student Veterans

Student veterans may now receive up to $20,000 in a grant or tuition waiver, which is matched by the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs.

by |December 7, 2017
tree ducks flooding

Why Do Floods Sometimes Happen on Sunny Days?

Some towns and cities can get soaked even when the skies are dry—and these so-called sunny day floods are on the rise thanks to climate change.

by |November 29, 2017

Sustainability Yes, But How?

So you want to make things “sustainable” at home or at work, and you can conceive of the changes that are needed. But do you know what it really takes to make the changes you want?

by |November 15, 2017

Students Practice What They Learn in Unique Sustainability Curriculum

A workshop in the Environmental Science and Policy MPA program challenges students to integrate their knowledge and apply it as if they were working in the field.

by |November 15, 2017
A nuclear power plant concept based on a new reactor design

Could New Nuclear Reactors Power America’s Low-Carbon Future?

A documentary featuring Earth Institute scientists suggests next-generation reactors could be a safe and clean way to replace fossil fuels.

by |November 9, 2017

NASA Finds New Way to Track Ozone By Satellite

Ozone pollution near Earth’s surface is one of the main ingredients of summertime smog. But it not directly measurable from space, due to the abundance of ozone higher in the atmosphere, which masks the surface. Now, researchers have devised a way to use satellite measurements of the precursor gases that contribute to ozone formation to predict when and where ozone will form.

by |November 6, 2017

Swapping Where Crops are Grown Could Feed an Extra 825 Million People

It could also reduce water stress, according to a new study that includes 14 major food crops from around the world.

by |November 6, 2017

Giant Boulders on Bahamas Coast Are Evidence of Ancient Storms and Sea Level, Says Study

A new study says that storms of intensities seen today, combined with a few meters increase in sea level, were enough to transport coastal boulders weighing hundreds of tons more than 100,000 year ago.

by |November 1, 2017

New Columbia Program to Help Define Women’s Roles in Peace and Security

Women on all different levels, from households to the highest ranks of government, are striving to gain a seat at the table when it comes peace and security. A new program launched today at Columbia University will help define what those roles might be

by |October 27, 2017