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Researchers have found the remains of an ancient lakebed off the edge of Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier, on what is now the seafloor. Such lakes lying today under the ice sheet may speed the flow of glaciers. (M. Turrin/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)

Meltwater Lakes Existed Under Antarctic Ice in Ancient Times

In recent years, scientists have discovered hundreds of lakes lying hidden deep beneath the Antarctic ice sheet. Now a team of researchers has found the remains of at least one sub-ice lake that existed when the ice was far more extensive, in sediments on the Antarctic continental shelf.

by |June 1, 2017
As rain belts shift due to uneven heating across the globe, wet areas will become wetter and dryer areas dryer, a new study affirms. Here, visitors cross a Panama farm field in a winter downpour. (Kevin Krajick/Earth Institute)

In a Warmer World, Expect the Wet to Get Wetter, and the Dry, Drier

As the world warms due to human-induced climate change, many scientists have been projecting that global rainfall patterns will shift. In the latest such study, two leading researchers map out how seasonal shifts may affect water resources across the planet.

by |May 31, 2017
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Building Regenerative Local Food Systems

On April 27, 2017, the Earth Institute, the School of International and Public Affairs, the Agriculture and Food Security Center and the Columbia Water Center presented the third annual Forum on Sustainable Agriculture, on Building Regenerative Food Systems.

by |May 30, 2017
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Climate Change Litigation Growing Rapidly, Says Global Study

A new global study has found that the number of lawsuits involving climate change has tripled since 2014, with the United States leading the way.

by |May 24, 2017
Photo Credit: Leo Douglas

Students Design Communications Plan for Conservation Organization

Students in the MPA Environmental Science and Policy program consulted with the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust to create a strategic communications plan, raising awareness of elephant and rhino conservation efforts.

by |May 23, 2017
The "Ice Pod" instrument array deployed off the side of a military cargo plane over Antarctica. Photo: Winnie Chu/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Lamont Scientists Are Focus of NY Times Multimedia Series

This past winter, reporters from the New York Times went along for the ride with scientists from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory as they flew their mission of discovery over Antarctica.

by |May 22, 2017
A NOAA water level monitoring station with an acoustic sensor on Dauphin Island, Alabama. Such tide gauges along the U.S. coast give scientists a baseline of sea level changes dating at least to the 19th century. Photo: NOAA/courtesy Morgan McHugh

Researchers Model Differences in East Coast Sea Level Rise

For years, scientists have been warning of a so-called “hot spot” of accelerated sea-level rise along the northeastern U.S. coast. But accurately modeling this acceleration as well as variations in sea-level rise from one region to another has proven challenging. Now new research offers the first comprehensive model for understanding differences in sea level rise along North America’s East Coast.

by |May 18, 2017
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Database Tracks Global Climate Law

A new online database is tracking climate change legislation around the world. The tool was launched this week in a joint effort by the Sabin Center for Change Law and the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.

by |May 9, 2017
Irrigation in Salinas, Calif. Depletion of groundwater resources in the United States and other major food exporters could eventually threaten food security around the world, a new study says. Photo: U.S. Department of Agriculture

Study: Overuse of Water Threatens Global Food Supply

In recent years, scientists have revealed that we are depleting our global groundwater reserves at an alarming rate. Now researchers have shown that a significant share of this unsustainable water use fuels the global food trade, which means water exhaustion in supplier nations could ripple outward, causing food crises half way across globe.

by |May 8, 2017
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Rock Samples Indicate Water is Key Ingredient for Crust Formation

By examining the cooling rate of rocks that formed more than 10 miles beneath the Earth’s surface, scientists led by The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences have found that water probably penetrates deep into the crust and upper mantle at mid-ocean spreading zones, the places where new crust is made.

by |May 3, 2017