Earth Institute » Page 2

kate orff at a desk

Columbia Landscape Architect Named MacArthur ‘Genius’

Kate Orff designs urban environments for the future by combining ecology, climate dynamics, and community.

by |October 11, 2017
volcano heat suit and sign about eruptions

Highlights from the 2017 Lamont-Doherty Open House

Through interactive exhibits, games, goo, and a few explosions, people of all ages learned about geology, earth science, and climate change.

by |October 9, 2017
fake volcano eruption

Lamont-Doherty Campus Will Open to the Public on Saturday

The annual Open House promises a day of science-filled fun.

by |October 3, 2017
A shop owner with one of Easy Solar's lanterns. / Photo: Nthabiseng Mosia

Alumni Startup Brings Pay-as-you-Go Solar Energy to Sierra Leone

In Sierra Leone, only 1 percent of rural citizens have access to electricity. Easy Solar, founded by graduates of Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs, hopes to change that.

by |September 25, 2017
hurricane irma seen from space

Hurricane Irma: Resources for Journalists

As Hurricane Irma batters the Caribbean with winds up to 185 miles per hour, Earth Institute experts are standing by to answer questions from the media.

by |September 6, 2017
Hurricane Harvey, as seen from space

Earth Institute Experts Break Down the Causes and Impacts of Hurricane Harvey

As Texas reels in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, our scientists are helping to make sense of how this storm became so destructive, and what’s needed for recovery.

by |August 30, 2017
book and globe

Internships Available at Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment

Turn in your application for a Fall 2017 internship by September 15.

by |August 29, 2017
power lines at sunset

Climate Change Could Spell Trouble for Europe’s Electrical Grid

Peak demand for electricity is expected to shift from winter to summer, and from Northern Europe to the South—changes that could strain the region’s infrastructure.

by |August 28, 2017
A new study projects the spread of the destructive southern pine beetle through much of the northern United States and southern Canada. Darker colors here represent infestations in successively later decades. (Lesk et al., 2017)

Climate May Quickly Drive Forest-Eating Beetles North, Says Study

Over the next few decades, global warming-related rises in winter temperatures could significantly extend the range of the southern pine beetle, one of the world’s most aggressive tree-killing insects, through much of the northern United States and southern Canada, says a new study.

by |August 28, 2017
tropical storm harvey forming in the gulf of mexico

Hurricane Harvey: Resources for Journalists

Earth Institute experts are on-hand to answer media questions about hurricane physics, rapid intensification, emergency response, and more.

by |August 24, 2017